Close family of Khuram Butt insisted they had no idea he was

Ms Rehman claimed she did not find her husband’s regular visits to the Ummah Fitness Centre – where he met his accomplices – suspicious, as she was too busy raising their two children. Her husband left the family home for the final time on June 3 without kissing either his son or baby daughter, she claimed. Through tears, she described his actions as “disgusting” and said she still struggled to look at the pictures of the people he killed.Mr Lucraft, however, took a dim view of the accounts provided by Butt’s three close relatives, who were all shielded from view as they spoke to the court. On Friday, he said of Butt: “He lived in a very small flat with his wife and all of the family knew something of his extreme views.”He added: “I have to say, I didn’t find any of them convincing witnesses. Each has accepted that they should now have done more at the time.” “There was a lot of things he didn’t tell me,” she said.In early 2015, she became aware that Butt was planning to take them to Turkey for a holiday, but believed this to be a “cover story” to sneak across the border to Syria.She alerted her father, who confiscated their passports and tore up the plane tickets.Another flash point of tension came when Butt appeared in a Channel 4 documentary called The Jihadis Next Door in January 2016, to the surprise of his family. However, the inquests heard that Ms Rehman had only walked out on her husband once – when he suggested he would like to have a second wife. Jonathan Hough QC, counsel to the inquests, asked her: “It might be suggested that you should have been provoked to that reaction, leaving , by what he had been doing in the previous year – his expressions of extremist views, associating with extremist figures. What would you say to that?”She replied that Butt was “still being a good husband and a good father and living a normal day-to-day life”.Similarly, when he hosted extremists including Anjem Choudary, the radical preacher, for dinner, she claimed she was segregated to a different part of their east London flat and excluded from conversation. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Zahrah Rehman, the widow of the London Bridge ringleader, was tearful as she insisted she knew nothing of his deadly intent.The mother of Khuram Butt’s two children described how friends had shunned her because they suspected she was complicit in his plot, telling a court: “You have to believe me, I didn’t know.”She was one of three close relatives who appeared at the inquests into his victims’ deaths to explain why they never raised the alarm about his deepening extremism.Each claimed they never considered that the 27-year-old, whose virulent Islamist outlook had brought him to the attention of MI5, was capable of murder.Ms Rehman told the Old Bailey she suspected her husband may one day travel to Syria, but never in her “wildest dreams” imagined he would bring carnage to London.Saad Butt, his older brother, claimed he felt “capable of monitoring him” thanks to his previous work in anti-extremism, for which he had received Government money.Butt’s darkening mindset – which had developed rapidly from around 2013 – likewise caught the attention of his sister and she expressed regret for failing to report him to authorities.The Chief Coroner of England and Wales, Mark Lucraft, took the unusual step of highlighting their failure to intervene as he delivered a narrative conclusion about each victim’s death.  He suggested Saad Butt “did very little, if anything” to effectively monitor his brother, but accepted the death of his daughter at around this time had plunged his life into turmoil.In his conclusions, the coroner added: “Multiple warning signs about the extremist views and conduct of one attacker were known to a number of his close family members in the months and years before the attack.“In the main these were not reported to the authorities.”Usman Darr, then husband of Butt’s sister Haleema, was the only member of his family to contact police, when he phoned an anti-terror hotline in September 2015. He had an explosive argument with Butt after he had sought to defend a video showing ISIL executioners burning a Jordanian pilot to death in Syria. Butt, by then a married father-of-one, had also been bombarding Mr Darr and other relatives with anti-Western messages on WhatsApp, alongside links to websites glorifying jihad. “I don’t like my religion being hijacked by extremists,” Mr Darr told the inquests as he explained his motivation.Ms Rehman claimed she had repeatedly clashed with her husband about his radical views in the years leading up to the attack, but insisted her husband would ignore her. 

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