Tilltson Fund grants $71,590 to Lyndon State College

first_imgSource: LSC. 9.16.2009 Lyndon State College is the recipient of a $71, 590 grant from the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, Northern Region. The money will be used for paid student internships in Essex County in Vermont and Coos County in New Hampshire. These two areas fall in one of the nation’s most economically depressed regions, and this support will help businesses develop sustainable business models.The grant creates a promising win-win situation for businesses and Lyndon students. Not only will the businesses have access to the latest in planning and development, but students will no longer have to choose between an unpaid internship and a job.Making these types of internship opportunities available is important to both preparing the region’s future workforce as well as helping these students play an active role in building the capacity of businesses and organizations that could become their future employers. The struggling economies of the Northeast Kingdom and Coos County provide an excellent laboratory for Lyndon State College students. By working under the close supervision of experienced faculty who are coordinating with engaged employers they will have the opportunity to put theory into practice while helping to keep and create jobs in the target area.This summer, for example, Lyndon State College senior Ashley Beard and two interns from Mt. Abraham Union High School worked under a Tillotson grant to map parts of the Northern Forest. This information will make the land more accessible to businesses who have questions about types and locations of specific kinds of timber on the land. Other Tillotson money has been used by the College for work with the Northwoods Stewardship Center and the Appalachian Mountain Club.The focus of this internship program will be to help put into practice the recommendations outlined in the SEI’s (Sustainable Economy Initiative) A Strategy for Regional Economic Resurgence while developing regional capacity along with that of participating businesses and organizations. Small and emerging companies, as well as nonprofits, are often unable to pay interns, which limits the pool from which the businesses can choose. Making these types of internship opportunities available is important to both preparing the region’s future workforce as well as helping these students play an active role in building the capacity of businesses and organizations that could become their future employers. The struggling economies of the Northeast Kingdom and Coos County provide an excellent laboratory for Lyndon State College students.The New Hampshire Charitable Foundation has been improving the quality of life in our communities since 1962. It builds and manages a collection of charitable funds totaling nearly $490 million, created by individuals, families and corporations. The Foundation has awarded more than $125 million in the past five years. Based in Concord, N.H., the Foundation roots itself in communities across the state through seven regions including Lakes, Manchester, Monadnock, Nashua, North Country, Piscataqua and the Upper Valley.last_img read more

Kennard moves to linebacker

first_imgAfter earning his first start last week against Arizona State, freshman defensive end Devon Kennard was given a surprising reward — a position change.Kennard has only been playing strongside linebacker since Monday but could start for the Trojans if linebacker Michael Morgan is unable to play. Morgan sprained his right wrist and is wearing a cast. His backup, Jarvis Jones, has been ruled out of the game with a neck injury.Repositioned · Freshman defensive end Devon Kennard has shifted to linebacker and may start in place of injured Michael Morgan. – Mike Lee | Daily TrojanUSC coach Pete Carroll said even if Morgan starts, Kennard will see plenty of playing time.“He’s played on the edge a lot for us, but he’s shown that he’s paying attention in the meetings,” Carroll said. “He’s a hammer out there.”At 6-foot-3, 255 pounds, Kennard would be USC’s biggest linebacker. The position switch has forced the freshman to embrace his new responsibilities.“I don’t feel like there’s too much difference from the position I was playing before, just a little bit more dropping [into coverage],” Kennard said. “There’s a little more thinking as well, so there’s a learning curve. But I’ve gotten better and more comfortable every day.”Kennard said he did not know whether the position switch would be temporary or permanent, but he was happy to have the chance to play more often. Junior Everson Griffen is slated to return this week at defensive end, which would relegate Kennard to a backup role.The adjustment has gone well so far, Carroll said.“It’s a lot to learn in a short amount of time, but he’s very well-equipped at that spot,” he said.Morgan is still limited by his cast, Carroll said, but still hopes to play against Stanford.“We’re trying to find out how comfortable he is playing with the cast,” Carroll said. “He practiced most of the time today, so I think he’s in good shape.”uQuarterbacks coach and offensive playcaller Jeremy Bates said Thursday that the USC offense would have to get back to basics if the unit wanted to get past its struggles.The Trojans’ offense could only muster one touchdown last week against Arizona State and converted just two of 13 third-down attempts. The team has spent twice as much as normal this week on fixing its third-down woes, Carroll said.Bates said he believed the offense had to establish a rhythm to avoid facing too many daunting situations.“We need to get some simple completions and keep driving the ball,” Bates said. “We kept stopping ourselves and never were in sync.”Carroll echoed those sentiments.“You hope to go with the things you can really count on in critical situations,” he said.Fourth-year wide receiver Damian Williams did not practice again Thursday. Carroll said the decision would “go all the way to the end of the week.”last_img read more