Tilltson Fund grants $71,590 to Lyndon State College

first_imgSource: LSC. 9.16.2009 Lyndon State College is the recipient of a $71, 590 grant from the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, Northern Region. The money will be used for paid student internships in Essex County in Vermont and Coos County in New Hampshire. These two areas fall in one of the nation’s most economically depressed regions, and this support will help businesses develop sustainable business models.The grant creates a promising win-win situation for businesses and Lyndon students. Not only will the businesses have access to the latest in planning and development, but students will no longer have to choose between an unpaid internship and a job.Making these types of internship opportunities available is important to both preparing the region’s future workforce as well as helping these students play an active role in building the capacity of businesses and organizations that could become their future employers. The struggling economies of the Northeast Kingdom and Coos County provide an excellent laboratory for Lyndon State College students. By working under the close supervision of experienced faculty who are coordinating with engaged employers they will have the opportunity to put theory into practice while helping to keep and create jobs in the target area.This summer, for example, Lyndon State College senior Ashley Beard and two interns from Mt. Abraham Union High School worked under a Tillotson grant to map parts of the Northern Forest. This information will make the land more accessible to businesses who have questions about types and locations of specific kinds of timber on the land. Other Tillotson money has been used by the College for work with the Northwoods Stewardship Center and the Appalachian Mountain Club.The focus of this internship program will be to help put into practice the recommendations outlined in the SEI’s (Sustainable Economy Initiative) A Strategy for Regional Economic Resurgence while developing regional capacity along with that of participating businesses and organizations. Small and emerging companies, as well as nonprofits, are often unable to pay interns, which limits the pool from which the businesses can choose. Making these types of internship opportunities available is important to both preparing the region’s future workforce as well as helping these students play an active role in building the capacity of businesses and organizations that could become their future employers. The struggling economies of the Northeast Kingdom and Coos County provide an excellent laboratory for Lyndon State College students.The New Hampshire Charitable Foundation has been improving the quality of life in our communities since 1962. It builds and manages a collection of charitable funds totaling nearly $490 million, created by individuals, families and corporations. The Foundation has awarded more than $125 million in the past five years. Based in Concord, N.H., the Foundation roots itself in communities across the state through seven regions including Lakes, Manchester, Monadnock, Nashua, North Country, Piscataqua and the Upper Valley.last_img read more

USAID, EHELD Project Ends with “Impressive” Results

first_imgUSAID, EHELD, UL officials and engineering students at the closing ceremony on the UL Fendall campusBy Edwin M. Fayia IIIA formal closing ceremony of the USAID-funded five year Excellence in Higher Education for Liberian Development (EHELD) was held on Friday at the UL Fendall campus.The education partnership and development initiatives were implemented by the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) and the Engineering College of the University of Liberia.At a well-attended closing ceremony, outgoing UL president Dr. Emmett A. Dennis expressed delight with the impressive achievements of the EHELD program at the University of Liberia.Dr. Dennis also lauded the efforts of the faculty and staff of the Engineering College for their commitment and dedication that have led to putting out quality students.“If anyone is to be happy about the USAID, RTI and EHELD education program at the UL, I should be considered foremost the happiest person,” Dr. Dennis added.He extended appreciation to the USAID mission in Liberia and their backup supporters in Washington D.C. for the timely support to the Engineering College.The current UL president, Dr. Ophelia I. Weeks, said efforts should be exerted to maintain and sustain the program.Dr. Weeks pledged to improve the quality of faculty, teachers and students of the UL Engineering College in the years to come.She also recounted that it was during the administration of Dr. Dennis that the EHELD-RTI-USAID program was initiated at the UL and the great transformation that has taken place at Engineering College.Dr. Weeks also extended gratitude to the multiple support partners including but not limited to the Universities of Michigan, North Carolina and Rutgers, RTI, USAID and many others.“We now have the responsibility to maintain and sustain the programs initiated by Dr. Dennis and UL administration on the USAID, EHELD and RTI project in the country,” Dr. Weeks said.She further underscored the need for the support of the faculty and instructors to produce quality students and the general improvement of the UL Engineering College.For her part, RTI senior economic development specialist and EHELD project manager Dr. Cheryl Doty said she exerted efforts at the EHELD program to upgrade the UL Engineering College.Dr. Doty added that she is also delighted that she was able to work with the project’s managers and lauded their splendid accomplishments.The RTI’s economic and development specialist said the Engineering College has the potential to bring greater developments to the UL and Liberia.In her statement, USAID acting deputy mission director Madam Karen Nelson said such an initiative builds a bridge between the peoples of Liberia and the United States.Madam Nelson thanked the UL, the Ministry of Education, the Commission on Higher Education and the RTI for their commitment to the USAID, EHELD and RTI project in Liberia.Madam Nelson stressed the need for the Engineering College to encourage high school students to consider enrolling and study engineering there.“Now I know that you have the required tools to work with at the Engineering College and I want to encourage you all to work harder in order to maintain and sustain the quality standards already established,” Madam Nelson added.Encouraging women to study engineering is a difficult task to accomplish, she admitted, and stressed the need for additional efforts to motivate them.“I am really encouraged by the management structure and would urge the USAID’s investment in vital sectors of education in Liberia,” Madam Nelson concluded.In separate statements, heads, chairs of departments and other stakeholders thanked USAID and the American government for the financial and professional support over the five-year period.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more