Archaeology Is Hindered by Evolutionary Assumptions

first_imgWhy was a complex village uncovered in Uruguay called “unexpected”?  Peter W. Stahl (anthropology, Binghamtom U.) asks the question in the Dec. 2 issue of Nature:1Evidence of unexpected complexity in an ancient community in Uruguay is a further blow to the conventional view of prehistoric development in marginal areas of lowland South America.    Archaeological research often reveals unexpected results.  This is common in South America, especially when archaeologists venture off the beaten track to explore unfamiliar areas.  However, our surprise is also a product of our preconceptions.  Recent work in the lowlands of tropical South America clearly bears this out, with discoveries of prehistoric complexity in unforeseen places and/or times.  On page 614 of this issue, Iriarte et al. present another example of precocious development in a hitherto little-explored and under-appreciated area.  The authors refer humbly to their results as unexpected; but given the profusion of surprises elsewhere, why would they be unexpected in the first place?The answer is that for over 60 years, archaeologists have been taught to think certain ways about marginal areas and primitive peoples.  They have been taught an “now-outmoded belief in cultural evolution, culture areas and trait diffusion; environmental determinism; a sketchy archaeological record; and an underestimation of the effects of European conquest on native populations,” Stahl claims.  Authorities like Julian Steward inculcated notions of slow urban development gradually creeping to outlying areas, and ‘traditional Indians’ living out their simple lives, surviving “relatively unchanged since deep time.”  Stahl takes issue with this, noting the number of contradictions with the evidence.  “Although few would buy into these ideas today,” he says, “Steward’s culture history has had an enormous impact on archaeological interpretation, both academic and popular.”    It’s hard to dislodge old myths.  Stahl is not surprised by the complexity of outlying villages, like the one by Iriarte et al. that showed:a large formal village plan, consisting of mound and plaza features, at a time (more than 4,000 years ago) and in a place where conventional wisdom would not have expected them to exist.  Moreover, subsequent occupation, intentional remodelling, settlement planning and village size indicate both a permanence and a density of population previously unthought of for this area.  Innovative analyses of plant microfossils and starch grains extracted from stone tools yield evidence for the early exploitation of maize, squash, beans and root crops in an area that was long considered non-agricultural, at least for prehistoric populations.It appears these people were doing what humans have always done: applying their brains and intentions to organize their lives with intelligence and skill.  This example “not only rejects much of the interpretational baggage carried by generations of archaeologists, but also exposes the potential for prehistoric culture in grasslands and wetlands, which were historically viewed as marginal areas,” he says.  In conclusion, he preaches, “Marginality and atrophied development are part of a flawed historic perspective.  Our expectations for indigenous achievements should be greater.”1Peter W. Stahl, “Archaeology: Greater expectations,” Nature 432, 561 – 562 (02 December 2004); doi:10.1038/432561a.Who gave the scientific world an image of primitive man evolving in marginal areas, living hand to mouth with very slow cultural evolution?  Who portrayed the relatively recent cities as the places where the lights of humanity first went on, and progress slowly spread into the outlying areas?  Was it not the Darwinists in Victorian Britain, who tended to view themselves as the intellectually superior race?  The history of Darwinian racism and treatment of indigenous peoples is a shameful lesson that has no justification today, as Stahl points out.    In contrast, Biblical creationists would see man as always fully man, endowed from the beginning with free will, language, culture and intelligence.  People groups spread rapidly over the globe after the flood, carrying a good deal of cultural memory with them.  Just because they didn’t always make pottery does not mean they weren’t good farmers or knew how to build complex villages.  Creationists would see a gradual degradation of ability because of sin, with occasional collective rises and falls of civilizations; there is also the counteracting tendency for technological knowledge to increase and accumulate over time.  Overall, creationists have greater expectations about indigenous achievements, and therefore are not surprised to find complexity in human cultures from the earliest times.  And that is exactly what archaeology shows: man is always fully man, capable of remarkable achievements, but needing salvation and escape from the “flawed historical perspective” of false teachers.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Timbuktu manuscripts get new home

first_imgSouth Africa handed over the brand new library for the Timbuktu Manuscripts to the Malian government in May. South Africa was instrumental in the building of the facility and the training of archival staff.Abdel Kader Haidara is a leading manuscript expert in Timbuktu. His collection includes an ancient Koran previously owned by several Moroccan kings. (Image: Mental Floss, Most Resource.org)Janine ErasmusOn 29 May 2010 South Africa officially handed over the brand new library for the Timbuktu Manuscripts to the Malian government. South Africa was instrumental in the building of the climate-controlled facility and the training of archival staff.The facility will be known as the Ahmed Baba Institute of Higher Learning and Islamic Research. It can house between 200 000 and 300 000 documents, and has space for exhibitions too.South Africa, represented by Minister in the Presidency Collins Chabane, transferred the building to the Malian minister of higher education and scientific research, Siby Ginette Bellegarde.The construction of the library was instigated by former president Thabo Mbeki, who visited Timbuktu in 2001.Mbeki later said he had been “moved” to see the dedicated staff at the Ahmed Baba Centre struggling to preserve the priceless documents with very little resources or funding. At that time there were about 18 000 manuscripts in the building. The centre is Timbuktu’s only public library.Without properly sealed rooms and climate control, the manuscripts were in danger of being irreversibly damaged by insects, the dry air and the abrasive Sahara sand.After seeing this Mbeki resolved to do something to intervene, and he declared the library’s construction an official Presidential project.On Africa Day in 2003 the project was initiated under the auspices of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development. Fittingly, Africa Day in 2010 was celebrated on 25 May, just four days before the handover ceremony.The entire project was managed through a trust fund, which helped to raise funds through various activities, such as public exhibitions in South Africa of some of the manuscripts in 2006 and 2008.The project had a threefold aim: to build the new library to cutting-edge specifications; to train Malian staff in the proper techniques of preservation and restoration; and to raise public awareness of the need to preserve this valuable part of Africa’s heritage.The South African National Archives was closely involved in the training process, both in South Africa and Mali.The existing Ahmed Baba Centre also underwent an extensive upgrade.Ancient hub of learningThe historic city of Timbuktu, which lies about 15km north of the Niger River in Mali, was founded around 1100 by Tuareg nomads, but it was only in the 11th century that a permanent settlement was established.Timbuktu was inscribed on Unesco’s World Heritage list in 1988. In its heyday, in the 15th and 16th centuries, the city was renowned as a centre for learning and Islamic studies. Scholars came from all over Africa to study at the many prestigious institutions which flourished there.Although many of its people are now impoverished, modern Timbuktu still evokes a sense of the golden days, not only in the historical buildings scattered all around, but in the many private libraries that still exist. These family-run libraries sprang up all over Timbuktu as more and more Muslim scholars passed through the city, leaving behind them a written legacy in subjects ranging from astronomy, mathematics and geography to religion and legal matters.Although nobody knows exactly how many manuscripts still exist, it is estimated that between 300 000 and 700 000 of the priceless tomes are preserved, most of them in private homes.Three imposing, ancient mosques – Djingareyber, Sankoré and Sidi Yahia – stand in the city as a reminder that the University of Sankoré once housed the largest collection of books since the one found in the ancient Library of Alexandria. The university still functions today, and accommodates about 15 000 scholars.While Africa is most often associated with an oral tradition of passing down learning and culture, the Tumbuktu manuscripts are proof that it also has a substantial written heritage – that was much greater than that found in Europe during the same era.The legendary Ahmed Baba was a scholar at Sankoré – he is honoured in the name of the current facility, built in the 1970s by the Malian government with the assistance of Unesco, which has tried to preserve, restore and digitise the documents.Sources: Unesco’s World Heritage Convention, AfricaDay.info and New Partnership for Africa’s Development.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa materiallast_img read more

Jawan among three killed in Pak. shelling

first_imgThree people, including a jawan, were killed and six injured in firing by Pakistani troops along the International Border (IB) and the Line of Control (LoC) in the Jammu division for the third day on Saturday, the police said.Nine persons had been killed in ceasefire violations in three days, police officials said.The jawan was killed after being hit by a bullet during the cross-border firing in the Krishna Ghati sector of Poonch district, the officials said.A Defence spokesman identified the soldier as sepoy Mandeep Singh, 23, a resident of Alampur village of Sangroor in Punjab.He said the Pakistani Army had launched unprovoked and indiscriminate firing of small arms and automatic guns in the sector.The Army retaliated strongly and effectively, the spokesman said.The officials said two civilians — Gaura Ram, 17, of Kapur R.S. Pura, and Gour Singh, 45, of Abdullian — were killed and five injured in firing by the Pakistani Rangers along the IB in Jammu district.A BSF spokesman said heavy cross-border firing was under way in the area from Octroi to Chenab (Akhnoor) in the Suchetgarh sector of R.S. Pura from Saturday morning, leaving a jawan injured in the Pargwal sector.The BSF retaliated and the exchange of fire was under way till the last reports were received.A jawan of the Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) was injured in cross-border shelling in Jammu, officials said. The condition of constable Lallu Ram was said to be stable.The jawan, who belongs to the 14th Battalion, was deployed for law and order duties along with the Jammu and Kashmir police at the Kanachak police station, when he was hit by splinters of a mortar shell that landed in the area.The heavy firing had forced thousands of border residents to flee their homes, and the authorities announced closure of educational institutions for three days along the LoC and the IB.Between 8,000 and 9,000 people living along the IB had shifted to safer places, and most of them were living with relatives, officials said.Over 1,000 people had been housed in camps in the R.S. Pura, Samba and Kathua areas, they said.last_img read more

London Olympics: Satisfied with my effort, says Mary Kom

first_imgThe atmosphere at the Excel arena was incredible as Indian icon Mary Kom and local favourite Nicola Adams slugged it out for a berth in the 51kg final in front of an appreciative audience. Match photosAt the end of four rounds, each lasting two minutes, the Briton had sealed her spot in the London Olympics final but Mary Kom walked out smiling having won millions of hearts at home and in the United Kingdom.As Mary Kom wore the bronze medal around her neck and remembered her twin sons, she became emotional. “I am sorry I could not win gold but at least I am taking back a bronze medal home,” said the 29-year-old supermom who has made millions of sacrifices for this day.Having won five world championship titles in the 48kg category and moved to the 51kg category for the Olympics, Mary Kom was at a disadvantage.But the way the diminutive Indian boxer threw in effort, though it did not translate into points on the computers, Mary Kom was superb.The Indian’s 6-11 loss to Nicola may sound bad, but Mary Kom made everyone forget it as she had a medal to show.Nicola did take control of the proceedings from the opening bell. Fast on her feet and landing punches with panache, Nicola was smart.With British prime minister David Cameroon also watching the bout, Nicola got that extra zing into play as she adopted a smart strategy of coming in and scoring points and then moving back. It was a pattern which the Indian had not bargained for.advertisementOnce into the second round, Nicola landed two thudding upper cuts while continuing to punch beautifully off the back foot. At the end of the third round the score was 8-4.Mary Kom knew she had to show aggression in the decider as there was no other go against an opponent whose footwork was slick. The sad part for Mary Kom was despite throwing all the weight she could, the points were not being scored.As the raucous audience lapped up every minute of the action, it was clear when Nicola was declared winner, there was a huge roar.However, Mary However was not disturbed as hundreds of media personnel waited for her to speak in English and then Hindi.”I have been living this Olympic dream for years and I know what it means to me and my country. All the sacrifices I have made in this life have been rewarded through this medal,” said Mary Kom.Asked about the scoring system, Mary Kom shot back: “I am scoring but they are not pressing the button and scoring!”However, Brig Muralidharan Raja, secretary of the Indian boxing federation said there was nothing to complain about. “It was a fair contest and we cannot complain about anything,” said Raja.Mary Kom’s medal means so much for women in Indian sport. It also puts her state Manipur prominently on the India map as they have faced a clutch of problems in day to day life.As the brand ambassador for women’s boxing, Mary Kom has left an indelible mark. This is the first time two Indian women have won medals in one Olympics and Mary Kom deserves all the praise and rewards for her efforts.She has spent invaluable time away from her family. “I cannot explain my feelings and emotions and I know I had millions praying for my medal,” said Mary Kom.To be sure, unlike men’s boxing, women’s boxing is not a glamorous sport at home. The total number of women boxers who compete in India is just in hundreds and not even a thousand.So for Mary Kom to come out tops with women’s boxing making its debut at the Olympics is a big deal.”We do expect that this medal will be an inspiration for women boxers in India,” said Raja.The magnitude of Mary Kom’s achievement will only be underlined when she returns to India. After all, it is her medal which has enhanced India’s medal tally to an all-time high of four in one Olympics.last_img read more

Champagne to announce ombudsman for corporate social responsibility

first_imgOTTAWA – The Liberal government is planning to make good on a campaign promise to create an ombudsman with teeth to oversee the conduct of Canadian companies operating abroad.International Trade Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne is expected to announce the creation of a new position on Wednesday.Government sources say the new position will be a substantive upgrade to the “corporate responsibility counsellor,” which has been widely criticized as a toothless entity for dealing with misconduct complaints against Canadian companies, mainly in the mining industry.One source, speaking on condition of anonymity in order to discuss a matter not yet made public, said the new ombudsman would have jurisdiction over more than just the mining sector, but provided no further details.The source said the position would be “the first in the world with real independence with real powers, and more than just mining.”It is not clear how much power the newly created position will be given, such as whether it will be able to compel specific behaviour from companies.The Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability, an organization pushing for changes, says it is encouraged by the pending announcement but needs more details on whether the new office will have real powers and independence before endorsing it.“Will the ombudsperson be relying on ministerial discretion to exercise investigator powers? Will the ombudsperson operate autonomously from Global Affairs Canada?” asked Stephanie Gervais, the group’s spokeswoman.The organization also wants Champagne to confirm whether the ombudsman can look at old cases retroactively or just new ones, she said.Hundreds of mining companies operating in Latin America, Africa and Asia make Canada a leading player in the sector. But the sector is periodically the subject of human rights complaints and legal action, often by Indigenous groups.The head of one of the largest investment firms that has consulted closely with the Trudeau government on its economic agenda distributed a letter this week telling big companies they need to step up their corporate responsibility efforts if they want to benefit from their financial largesse.“To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society,” writes Laurence Fink, the chief executive of BlackRock, in a letter that was first obtained by the New York Times this week.If companies don’t engage better with local communities, Fink writes, they will “ultimately lose the license to operate from key stakeholders.”In November 2016, BlackRock was among the of the world’s most powerful institutional investors to take part in a summit hosted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.According to a draft agenda, Fink and Trudeau were to deliver the opening remarks at the gathering, which used the opportunity to promote Canada as an attractive place to invest. BlackRock was asked to invite its clients to the event.In the lead-up to the summit, BlackRock reportedly participated in biweekly conference calls with Infrastructure Canada and the Privy Council Office to create a presentation Infrastructure Minister Amarjeet Sohi was to deliver to the investors.Trudeau will meet more business leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, next week in an attempt to continue selling Canada as a prime investment destination.“We must have the full and equal participation of all to have economies that work for everyone and a future that is fairer, more inclusive, and more compassionate,” Trudeau said in a statement.— With files from Andy Blatchford in Ottawalast_img read more

Natural Resources Minister fires back against critics after federal funding announcement

first_imgCALGARY (660 NEWS) – Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi has responded to some of the critics of Tuesday’s massive funding announcement for the oil and gas sector in Alberta.He actually agreed with some of his critics, specifically the idea that this funding is not a long-term solution.Just spoke with the Natural Resources Minister @SohiAmarjeet. He agreed with some critics of yesterday’s announcement that this isn’t the long-term solution to Alberta’s energy woes. He says pipelines are still the answer, but something had to be done in the meantime @660NEWS— Kenny Mason (@krmason7) December 19, 2018Sohi argues that while the regulatory processes for building pipeline projects like Trans Mountain move forward, something needed to be done in the meantime.“What we’re focused on is that as we move toward building pipelines, how (can we) support industry now,” he said.He added this funding will allow companies the breathing room they need to survive in these tough times, similar to programs which were announced with the Business Development Bank of Canada and Export and Development Canada. Sohi said close to $1.5-billion was allocated in 2016, and the vast majority of that was used by businesses because they needed that support at that time. Now, he believes companies could use that support again.READ MORE: Experts weigh in on the federal investment into Alberta oil and gas “So what we announced (Tuesday) $1.6-billion will provide loans to get those businesses through these difficult times so they can make their payroll commitments,” he said. “This support is very meaningful for those businesses who need this support.”While there was no promise to get Trans Mountain started again in 2019 he says the work is being done to get it approved and built.“I am very confident that through our consultations with Indigenous peoples that we will be able to move forward on this project,” he said.Sohi retorted against some of the criticisms of the much maligned Bill C-69 saying it will actually help projects get built.“The current system is not working, you know, you can talk all about what’s wrong with Bill C-69, but I think what we need to do is fix what’s not working now,” he said.Some industry analysts asserted this bill, as it stands, would mean no pipeline project would ever be built in Canada. He does say he is open for changes to that bill.“Are there amendments to make Bill C-69 better? Absolutely we will look at those amendments, if they’re appropriate and allow us to actually achieve what we want to do, which is create certainty for businesses, and create certainty for, you know, Canadians that we will have a process in place that allows us to grow our economy, build pipelines, at the same time protect our environment, and allow Canadians to participate in the process.”last_img read more

Should we Reject Democracy to Be Able to Drink Whiskey

first_imgRabat- With a matchless spontaneity and an even more commendable honesty, the Algerian singer Khaled said that he supports the candidacy of Abdelaziz Bouteflika for a fourth term, despite all the demonstrations and protests that the country is facing.“At least, with Bouteflika, you can now go out with friends and go in palaces in Algeria,” Khaled said. “You can order a glass of whiskey and drink it. I must say it in the clearest and the most sincerely way of the world.” Khaled doesn’t support the sick candidate for a fourth term because he has a convincing political, economic and social program… No. He supports him because thanks to Bouteflika, he can drink alcohol in public places. This makes Bouteflika a popular candidate because he defends a particular lifestyle based on individual freedom and an open society. The people in Algeria fear these freedoms will evaporate if the president is not reelected.What Khaled said, spontaneously and frankly, is an opinion shared by the Maghreb and Arab elites who avoid declaring this support openly themselves. These people are afraid to see the fundamentalists coming: the great opponents of whiskey in front of (and on behalf of) the Lord– the great enemies of a liberal life.These elites are fighting against any democratic changes in our societies. They fear to see the bearded take positions of power with the hopes to remove certain benefits and freedoms. They hide behind slogans, ideas and attitudes that don’t accurately reflect their fears for their personal freedom, provided by despotic regimes led by secular elites (socialist, liberal or nationalist). So, the secular in our country are struggling against democracy because it could bring in the Islamists. But the latter, unfortunately, represent the majority in these conservative societies.Groups aim to be dictatorial because their despotism is political. The Islamists despotism affects the societal norm, impacting daily routines and personal choices. As between two evils, namely two dictatorships, you need to choose the lesser. Then go with the seculars… So how can we move away from this system that only offers autocratic government or an opposition that is just as much autocratic?There is, of course, a solution, that can be valid only if we consider as a mistake to have to choose between these two camps. What secular and Islamists have retained from democracy is the power of the ballot box, that allows the majority, the day after the elections, to dominate a minority. And this is a serious mistake.Democracy is a package of principles, rules and practices including: protection of individual freedoms, separation and balance of powers, freedom of the press, and rights for minorities…. The system that defends the right of minorities is always democracy, not absolutism.An elected government has no right to ban someone from drinking alcohol, a woman from  going to the beach or a girl from wearing jeans. This comes, indeed, under the individual freedoms. People who know their freedoms and the meaning of democracy can’t accept the guardianship or autocracy, even if it’s religious. This is true that in Afghanistan, Sudan or Iran, a particular way of life is imposed by the political powers by force. But they arrived at the head of their country by violence, coup, revolution, and armed conflict. Not in a democratic way.A large part of the political, cultural and media elites fears or feared the Arab Spring, and  didn’t support the enthusiasm of young people in their respective countries for democracy. These elites feared for their lifestyles and finally chose autocracy and despotism instead of freedom and liberalism.Translated by Nahla Landoulsi. Edited by Saba Naseemlast_img read more

And The Oscar Goes To No Place

David Stern wants action, not acting.“Flopping” in the NBA is when a player goes through exaggerated motions to give the impression he was hit harder than he was to dupe the referee into calling a foul on the opposition. This bad acting is more than norm now than the exception, and commissioner David Stern wants to see it controlled.“I think it’s time to look at (flopping) in a more serious way,” Stern told ESPN, “because it’s only designed to fool the referee. It’s not a legitimate play in my judgment. I recognize if there’s contact (you) move a little bit, but some of this is acting. We should give out Oscars rather than MVP trophies.In Game 1 on the Miami Heat vs. New York Knicks first-round series, Tyson Chandler was assessed a flagrant foul 1 on league MVP LeBron James after James ran into a well-timed screen by Chandler. There was contact, yes. But the 6-foot-8, 260-pound James acted as he were blindsided by an NFL linebacker. He went stumbling to his side, his arms flailing. His stunt to the court, where he rolled around, grabbing his neck and grimacing as if he had been shot him in the back. Fake.James is not aone, as several other stars have become prone to “flopping.” Take the Los Angeles Clippers, as an example. They have come under fire as a team for excessive flopping. Memphis Grizzlies forward Zach Randolph claims Chris Paul is to blame, telling ESPN Radio, “It all starts with Chris, because Blake (Griffin) didn’t really used to flop like that.”Boston’s Paul Pierce is another who goes into a stunt fall or over-the-top stumble most every time there is contact. The game has been cleaned up from the 1990s to where there is no hand-checking and hard fouls are not flagrant fouls. If the floppers have their way, a “foul” will be called on most every play. Expect Stern and the league to come up with something to penalize “floppers.” And rightfully so. read more

Ohio State mens soccer trounces Rutgers 41

The field at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium awaits a match between OSU and Rutgers on Oct. 25. OSU won, 4-1. Credit: Ed Momot / For The LanternIn its final homestand of the regular season, things got off to a quick start for the Ohio State men’s soccer team.OSU (7-5-3, 4-2-0) won its third straight with a blowout of Rutgers (5-9-1, 1-5-1), 4-1, in the first-ever matchup between the two schools.Sophomore forward Danny Jensen scored his second goal of the season with a header just 36 seconds into the game. He took a high pass sent from the corner by senior midfielder Max Moller and put it high into the net.Then, in the second half, Jensen wasted even less time before adding his second goal of the night – that one coming 29 seconds in. Senior midfielder Yianni Sarris left the ball behind him in front of the box for Jensen, who swooped in and put it into the near corner of the net to put OSU up, 3-1.“Probably the most important thing that the team talks about is the first five minutes of every half is going to be what sets the tone, so we give everything for that,” Jensen said.Jensen’s two-goal effort was the first multi-goal performance of the season for the Buckeyes.“My teammates put me in the right position to score, and I finally put a few in the back of the net,” Jensen said. “It’s a huge monkey off my back. Especially coming toward the end of the season, winning games like this feels really good.”After Jensen’s first goal opened up the scoring, the Scarlet Knights knotted the score in the 22nd minute. Freshman forward Jason Wright deflected a free kick from sophomore midfielder Erik Sa. OSU redshirt-senior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov was playing the free kick toward the middle of the net, so he didn’t have a chance to stop the deflection into the far corner.The goal — which was his eighth of the season — brought Wright within one of the Big Ten lead.“He’s a quality player,” OSU coach John Bluem said. “He’s scored a lot of goals this year and he holds the ball well up top. He’s dangerous.”In the 36th minute, defender Liam Doyle gave OSU the lead back when he scored his second goal in as many games. The junior twisted a free kick from just outside the box into the upper-left corner of the net.The score was Doyle’s fifth of the season, putting him into a tie with Sarris for the team lead.The British defender has taken advantage of his chances when Bluem has called his name this season — three of his goals have come from penalty kicks, while the other pair came on free kicks.“We do have a lot of confidence in (Doyle) to be successful with those penalty kicks and free kicks,” Bluem said. “I’m glad to see him get a free kick tonight, it was a beauty.”The teams went into the half with neither Ivanov nor his Rutgers counterpart, sophomore David Greczek, making a save. Overall, OSU held the lead in first-half shots, 6-3.Junior defender Kyle Culbertson put the exclamation point on the match late in the 65th minute with his third goal of the season. Culbertson received a feed directly in front of the net from senior midfielder Ryan Ivancic and simply poked his foot out to direct it in. Sophomore forward Christian Soldat was also credited with an assist on the score.The win marked the first three-game winning streak of the season for the Buckeyes, as well as the second win decided by more than two goals – the first came in their previous game, a 3-0 victory against Bowling Green on Wednesday.“It feels amazing, but you can’t relax,” Soldat said. “It’s the Big Ten, one of the top conferences in the country, so you can’t relax, but it feels great to be clicking.”Jensen agreed that the team is playing at a higher level late in the season.“We’re starting to understand each other a lot more and hitting our stride at the perfect time,” Jensen said. “It’s awesome.”For the game, OSU outshot Rutgers, 11-6.Ivanov was pulled from the game with about 17 minutes to go for redshirt-senior goalkeeper Andrian McAdams. That marked the first time OSU has played without Ivanov on the field since Sept. 20, 2013, against Dayton, when Ivanov had to sit out because of a previous red card – a game that McAdams started.“Andrian is a soldier,” Bluem said. “We wouldn’t be where we are without Andrian McAdams. It’s very difficult to be a backup, especially when you’ve got a quality first-team goalkeeper like Alex Ivanov. But he is, without getting to play very much, one of the most important guys on the team, because if something happens to Ivanov, he’s coming in.”OSU is set to conclude its regular season home schedule on Tuesday against Kentucky. That game is set to kick off at 7 p.m. at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more