Maple syrup production season gives way to maple syrup eating season

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Shelly Detwiler, berry farmer and dieticianWhat’s up with all the buckets on the trees? It’s maple syrup time! According to the Ohio Maple Producers Association, maple syrup contributes $5 million to our state’s economy. Only 13 states produce maple syrup and Ohio ranks in the upper half, producing almost 100,000 gallons. The demand for maple syrup is bigger than is currently produced.The history behind maple syrup boils down to the Indians finding the sap oozing from broken branches. The story goes that the Indians hollowed out logs, filled it with the sap and then threw in hot coals to reduce the syrup.The Johnson Family in Cable has been making syrup since 1934. Eric Johnson said 2019 has been a good year for maple syrup for the operation. Their family produces, on average, 300 gallons of syrup a year that they market right on site as well as local farmers markets. Yo-yoing winter temperatures actually improve syrup production. Based largely on the temperature fluctuations, syrup season starts around Feb. 15 and goes until the buds and honeybees come (around April 1). It takes 45 to 50 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. Eric uses wood fires to cook down his sweet syrup, which takes longer than other producers who use reverse osmosis.Pure maple syrup must be grade A and labeled as such to be sold in a retail establishment. All maple syrup is produced with reduction. The syrup recently took on a new grading system based on color.There are three grades of maple syrup. Grade A Golden Delicate Grade A Amber RichGrade A Dark RobustGolden maple syrup has a delicate taste. It is the most popular. Amber maple syrup has a slightly darker color and a richer taste. Consumers like this for its fuller bodied and medium taste. Dark maple syrup has a robust taste than amber and golden syrup. Very dark maple syrup has a very strong taste and is usually used for sugar.The difference in the colors? It sounds like a mystery to me, but Eric says that color can be affected by: the part of the season the sap is harvested, length of cooking and/or rainfall. Most of Eric’s 2019 syrup has been graded as amber rich. He said the industry encourages the golden delicate grade but customers seem to request darker syrup, whether this is due to comparison to commercial syrups on the market or some other reason is unknown.Nutritionally speaking maple syrup has a similar carbohydrate content as white/brown sugar with 13 grams of carbohydrates per tablespoon. Maple syrup has a few more minerals and antioxidants than other sugars such as manganese and zinc, however it’s still packs plenty of sugar and calories. Don’t get caught up in the latest food trends, enjoy maple syrup in moderation because of taste, flavor and likeability. Maple syrup is a great way to sweeten your waffles, salad dressings, or even cook a hot dog in (which I enjoyed at Johnsons!) Eat well and Healthy,Shelly Spaghetti Squash with Maple Syrup and Shallots pioneerwoman.com2 whole Medium Spaghetti Squash3 Tablespoons Butter2 whole Shallots, Finely Minced1/4 cup Maple SyrupDash of SaltDash of Nutmeg Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Pierce spaghetti squash a few times with a sharp knife. Place on a cookie sheet and bake for 1 hour. Cut squash in half. Scoop out and discard seeds and slimy pulp. Scrap out the rest of the squash with a fork. Place in a bowl. Keep warm. In a large skillet, melt butter. Cook shallots over medium heat for 2 minutes or until soft. Reduce heat and add maple syrup. Cook for a minute, then remove from heat. Stir in salt. Pour mixture over squash. Sprinkle on nutmeg and mix together gently. Sever warm. Serves 8.Maple-Bourbon Banana Pudding Cake foodandwine.com6 Tbsp. unsalted butter½ c sugar1 overripe banana, mashed1 large egg, room temp1 cup milk, room temp1 cup flour,1 Tbsp. baking powderPinch of salt¾ c pure maple syrup½ c light brown sugar2 Tbsp. bourbon¼ c finely chopped pecansVanilla ice cream Preheat the oven to 375°. In a deep, 2-quart baking or soufflé dish, melt the butter in the microwave. Whisk in the superfine sugar and banana, mashing until thoroughly combined. Whisk in the egg and milk.In a bowl, whisk the flour, baking powder and salt; whisk into the baking dish until combined (the batter will be pretty loose).In a microwave-safe cup, heat the maple syrup, light brown sugar and 1/2 cup of hot water at high power until hot, 1 minute. Add the bourbon. Drizzle the syrup mixture over the batter; it will seep to the bottom. Do not stir. Scatter the pecans on top.Set the dish on a rimmed baking sheet and bake for 40 minutes, until the cake is golden. Let cool for 5 minutes, then scoop into bowls and serve with ice cream. Serves 6  Smokey Maple-Mustard Salmon eatingwell.com 3 Tbsp. whole-grain or Dijon mustard1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup¼ teaspoon smoked paprika or ground chipotle pepper (see Notes)¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper⅛ teaspoon salt4 4-ounce skinless salmon fillets Preheat oven to 450°F. Line a baking sheet with foil and coat with cooking spray.Combine mustard, maple syrup, paprika (or chipotle), pepper and salt in a small bowl. Place salmon fillets on the prepared baking sheet. Spread the mustard mixture evenly on the salmon. Roast until just cooked through, 8 to 12 minutes.Notes: Smoked paprika is made from smoke-dried red peppers and adds earthy, smoky flavor. Chipotle peppers are dried, smoked jalapeño peppers. Look for different types of paprika and ground chipotle chile pepper in the spice aisle at some large supermarkets or at tienda.com or penzeys.com. Serves 4.   Roasted Root Vegetables With Balsamic-Maple Glaze cookinglight.com Cooking spray8 oz. red onions, each cut into 8 wedges with root intact8 oz. purple sweet potatoes, cut into 3/4-inch cubes8 oz. small multicolored carrots, (including purple), cut on an angle into 2-inch-long pieces, divided2 Tbsp. cup olive oil, divided8 oz. turnips, each cut into 8 wedges8 oz. parsnips, cut on an angle into 2-inch-long piecesdash salt1/2 teaspoon black pepper3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup1 ½ tsp.chopped fresh thyme leavesPreheat oven to 450°F. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper, and lightly coat with cooking spray.Combine onions, purple sweet potatoes, purple carrots, and 1 tablespoons olive oil in a large bowl; toss to coat, and arrange in a single layer on a prepared baking sheet. In the same bowl, combine turnips, parsnips, remaining carrots, and remaining 1 tablespoons olive oil, and toss to coat; arrange in a single layer on the other prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle both baking sheets of vegetables evenly with salt and pepper. Bake purple vegetable mixture at 450°F, without stirring, until tender, about 25 minutes. Bake turnip mixture at 450°F, without stirring, until tender and lightly caramelized, 30 to 35 minutes.While vegetables bake, combine vinegar and syrup in a small saucepan over medium-high. Bring to a boil, without stirring, and cook until mixture is thickened, 6 to 8 minutes. (You should have about 1/2 cup of liquid.) Remove from heat, and cool to room temperature; sauce will thicken to syrupy consistency upon cooling.Arrange roasted vegetables on a platter, and drizzle with balsamic syrup. Sprinkle with fresh thyme, and serve immediately. Serves 5 (serving size: 1 1/4 c)last_img read more

A Mother and Son Geocaching Bond

first_imgHow did you discover geocaching?I discovered it when a couple of my Facebook friends posted about going geocaching last summer. I Googled it instead of asking! I originally didn’t even think to include Brian (CoolGuy84’s real name—and BTW he made up his own geo-name), my younger son and his gf had heard of it before and had been wanting to try it, so the 3 of us set out one evening and only found 2 of the 5 we looked for, but were hooked none the less.What attracted you to geocaching as a mother and son activity?We live in a small Missouri town (suburb of KC) and were surprised to find so many geocaches in Raytown—Brian eventually joined us for a few adventures as the others of us got the hang of caching. My other son and his girlfriend lost the fever somewhat between work and life, but Brian was hooked. Its kind of a long story, but in the previous year and a half my family had quite a few losses. We had evolved into sad depressed lumps. Once we discovered geocaching suddenly we were out almost everyday. We went hiking on the trails; we ran up and down hills; climbed rocks and got fresh air and sunshine! I know it sounds sappy but it was kind of a miracle in our lives.What’s your advice about geocaching to others with family members who have Down Syndrome?Brian searching for a geocacheThe only advice I have is to not hesitate to include them! Depending on their age there are a variety of ways they can participate. Younger kids can just enjoy the family time and the exercise and fresh air (and eventually become experts). Kids with Down Syndrome tend to be very sedate in nature and would be happy sitting; but then tend to be overweight also. There’s all kinds of therapeutic benefits too—it’s a gross motor activity, fine motor activity (getting to the containers; opening containers; digging through the swag and picking out what you want), it’s a cognitive activity—putting the pieces of the puzzle together to locate the cache. And it also has all the same benefits for them as with typical kids—learning about nature (we saw 2 deer in the woods closeup last weekend and Brian was in awe); traveling, learning geography, history (we’ve done several mystery caches that have taught both of us some interesting history facts). With older kids/adults like Brian it gives them quite a sense of accomplishment, pride and self-confidence.  He is SO excited about all of them whether they are quick Park and Grab geocaches (P&Gs) (which he does love and doesn’t usually need my help at all) or if we’re hiking through the woods. Most of all its just plain fun for everyone and can help build a close family bond and hobby.You describe “CoolGuy84” as a freak for geocaching. What excites him so much about the activity? He just gets excited when he figures out where the caches are; he actually does better than me at actually finding the containers. I can read the maps/GPS like a champ and I can drive us there, but I find that he doesn’t have preconceived ideas about what a container should look like or where it should be hidden so he just looks everywhere! Even if I say “ehhh no its probably not there, I don’t know how they could hide one there” then BAM he has it found. He’s always so proud of himself and takes ALL the credit for finding it. Here is our caching chant: ME: “I drive the car, I read the map, you find the cache!! What do we call that?” BRIAN: “ TEAMWORK!!!” ————————A special thanks to Peggy for sharing the story from all of us at Geocaching HQ. Leave a comment for Peggy and Brian below.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedGeocaching Employee Spotlight: Tom, Veep of Marketing & MerchApril 10, 2016In “Community”The Seanachai: Keeper of the Old Lore, Reviewer of the New CachesMay 6, 2015In “Community”Geocaching Employee Spotlight: Product Owner & Avid Geocacher, Ben HewittMarch 13, 2016In “Community”center_img Brian and Peggy on a geocache runThe post on the Geocaching Facebook page started with “My 28 yr old son (who has Down Syndrome) is my best geo-buddy!” The post from Peggy Caton, PeGC56, instantly struck the heart of geocaching buddies sharing an adventure. They search for ‘hidden-treasure’ only find the real treasure right next to them the whole way.Peggy answers a few questions about geocaching, and about her best bud and son Brian who goes by the geocaching name CoolGuy84.last_img read more

4 Tough Conversations You Must Have to Succeed in Sales

first_imgWe like selling when it’s collaborative, when we get to help our clients through their process. We don’t like it so much when we have to deal with the inherent conflict that is part of sales and selling. If you are going to succeed in sales, you are going to have to be comfortable and confident having some tough conversations. Here are four of them.Time: The very first conversation you have with your dream client is tough conversation. You have to ask them for the commitment of time so you can explore working with them. They have to deny your request because they are too busy, they’ve said no to everyone else, it wouldn’t be fair, and they’re certain you aren’t going to make it worth their while. You want to be collaborative, but the very first conversation begins with your client telling you “no” and you refusing their very first request. If you want in, you have to have this conversation.Access: Once your past that first tough conversation, you have to ask for access. You need access to information, and if you are really good, information no one else has asked for. You also need access to additional stakeholders. Your new contact struggles to give you information. What do you need it for? What are you going to do with it? No one else has asked for it? She struggles to give you access to other stakeholders. Why do we need them? What if they take control of this project? What if I lose the relationship? If you want access, you have to have this conversation.What’s Right: Your dream client thinks he knows what he wants. But he’s wrong. What he wants isn’t going to solve his problem, and it isn’t going to deliver the result he believes it will. But he believes it nonetheless. You have to tell him he can’t have what he wants, it won’t work, and why you don’t want to give it to him. If you want to really serve your client as a consultative salesperson and trusted advisor, you have to engage here.Price: Your price is higher than your competitors. It’s higher than what the client is paying now. But it is the right investment to produce the right result. But still, your client pushes back. He wants a lower price. He wants to compare you to your competitors, none of who can deliver what you deliver. If you are going to win at the price that delivers results, you have to talk about the right investment.last_img read more

Zaheer leads India comeback after Watson’s slow ton

first_imgAustralia’s strong start gave way to an Indian comeback on Day 1 of the Mohali Test. Opener Shane Watson’s fortuitous, sedate hundred was followed by Zaheer Khan’s fine old-ball spell.Scores – India vs AustraliaBrief Scores: Australia 224-5Dropped on zero by Virender Sehwag at gully off the day’s second ball off Zaheer, Watson was let off again on 37 by MS Dhoni off Pragyan Ojha.After the fall of Ricky Ponting (71) and the end of their 141-run stand, Australia slowed down as Watson crawled to his second Test hundred off 258 balls. The dull finish to the day was spiced up only by Ponting’s spat with Zaheer.Ponting, having elected to bat, had some luck himself. He was caught down the leg-side off a no-ball from Ishant Sharma, who was wayward, bowled plenty of no-balls and then left the field in the noon session after a knee problem.Ponting’s run-out, thanks to a direct hit from Suresh Raina, turned things around. Australia’s scoring rate slipped dramatically, from a little under five runs in the morning, to under two in the evening.After Ponting’s fall, at 154-2 in 41.4 overs, Australia made 90 runs today at 1.86 runs in 48.2 overs. Watson too slowed down near his hundred, partly since he’s been out three times in the 90s.Zaheer had earlier in the day trapped Simon Katich in front with the in-swinging ball. The delivery would be used again with the old ball to remove Mike Hussey and Marcus North, all left-handers.Hussey played inside the in-coming ball and was hit in front, while North left a similar delivery which gently dislodged the off-bail on its way.advertisementThis is Watson’s third hundred in a week, having made two in Australia’s warm-up game against Board President’s XI at the start of this tour.While Pragyan Ojha continued to be economical, Harbhajan Singh, like Ishant, was off-colour but made up with the wicket of Michael Clarke in the evening session. World No. 1 India had had the better of Australia when the two had last met in a Test series, in India in 2008.The hosts had won 2-1 the series in which Anil Kumble and Sourav Ganguly retired from Test cricket.The Mohali wicket, normally known for pace and bounce, is expected to get slower and lower as the game progresses.India have left out Murali Vijay, Amit Mishra, Sreesanth for this game. Cheteshwar Pujara too would have to wait longer for his Test debut.Raina and Ojha have been retained, while Gautam Gambhir returns to the team after a break.Australia are playing by their strengths, going in with three pacers and Nathan Hauritz as the lone spinner.  Teams:Australia (Playing XI): Simon Katich, Shane Watson, Ricky Ponting (c), Michael Clarke, Michael Hussey, Marcus North, Tim Paine (w), Mitchell Johnson, Nathan Hauritz, Ben Hilfenhaus, Doug Bollinger.India (Playing XI): Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Rahul Dravid, Sachin Tendulkar, VVS Laxman, MS Dhoni (w/c), Suresh Raina, Harbhajan Singh, Zaheer Khan, Pragyan Ojha, Ishant Sharma.last_img read more

Ind vs Eng: Sunny, Holding slam Dhoni and Co

first_imgFormer captain Sunil Gavaskar has blamed poor technique of Indian batsmen for the team’s dismal show in the Test series in England, saying the tourists have looked like a “school boys’ team”.Team India was found wanting in all three departments of batting, bowling and fielding as they were outplayed by the English side.Down 2-nil in the series, Team India’s two losses in the series have exposed a lot of chinks in their armour and experts worry that if India does not improve immediately M.S. Dhoni’s team stand to lose their top Test ranking.Scathing in his criticism of the world number one side, Gavaskar states that the Indians have been “totally outplayed by England in the second Test so much so that it looked like a contest between a professional team and a school boys’ team”.Gavaskar elaborates, “The batting has failed to get to 300 in four innings and the bowling in both Tests has faded away after a bright beginning”.Talking specifically about the batsmen, the master criticises the batting technique of both the seniors and the youngsters in the side: Getting onto the front foot and they suddenly find that when it comes to overseas pitches and the quicker bowlers, “they just don’t know how to play off the back foot”.India just does not care about international commitments: HoldingThe poor show by Dhoni and company in England is drawing flak world wide.Legendary West Indian fast bowler Michael Holding has slammed Indian cricketers for below average performance so far, even claiming that it was the money that was on offer in the IPL that had ensured that the Indians just did not care about their international commitments.  The former pacer questioned why none of the players pull out of IPL with injuries, suggesting that the money on offer ensured that international commitments take a back seat.  Holding went on to accuse Team India of neither playing like world champions nor putting in extra effort.advertisementlast_img read more