Steph Curry dances and dazzles in Manila return

first_imgKevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday PLAY LIST 03:12Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Curry capped the first day of his visit with some hoops and some jukes as he danced and played alongside current PBA players.Heads up MMDA, Steph (@StephenCurry30) does the In My Feelings challenge! #WiredDifferent #SC30AsiaTour pic.twitter.com/FPyT95r3TQ— INQUIRER Sports (@INQUIRERSports) September 7, 2018Amateur players from the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand played in a couple of 3×3 games divided into girls and boys’ divisions.ADVERTISEMENT Not yet done: Curry determined to lead Warriors to more titles View comments MOST READ It was a long wait but NBA superstar Stephen Curry delivered on his promise to return to the Philippines and enthrall thousands of his supporters.ADVERTISEMENT Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title There was also skills course featuring PBA players Poy Erram, Troy Rosario, Mark Barroca, and PJ Simon, who won the exhibition, and shootout contest starring Marc Pingris, Christian Luanzon, Harvey Carey, Willie Miller, and their sons.Miller and his son topped the preliminaries which was also participated by Stanley Pringle, Von Pessumal, and Fiba 3×3 3-point shootout champion Janine Pontejos.Steph and Dell winning the father and son shootout contest. #WiredDifferent #SC30AsiaTour | @BLozadaINQ pic.twitter.com/GZzRR2HKRW— INQUIRER Sports (@INQUIRERSports) September 7, 2018Curry joined the action to the delight of the fans, but lost to Simon in their skills course.But teaming up with his father Dell, Curry showcased his sweet shooting stroke and defeated Miller in the culmination of the shootout contest.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Curry last visited Manila in 2015 right after Golden State won the Larry O’Brien trophy and this year’s trip also followed another championship for the Warriors, who have gained a big fan base here in this basketball-crazy country.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’“It feels great, so much support here in the Philippines in what I do in the basketball court,” said Curry Friday during a showcase at Mall of Arena Arena as part of the Philippine stop for his Under Armour Asia Tour.“I told everyone at MOA Arena that I will be back and it took a long time to get back.” LATEST STORIES Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anewlast_img read more

Megachurch phenomenon spreading

first_imgSAN ANTONIO – The noise of chatting parishioners saturates the foyer after the five weekend Masses at St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church. Busy parents sympathize with one another. Kids find new playmates. And singles meet other singles. The foyer helps the 5,000 worshippers each weekend preserve their sense of community. The fast-growing congregation decided five years ago to expand into a 1,500-seat sanctuary instead of splitting into two separate congregations and search for an available priest among a shrinking pool. Catholic churches are joining their Protestant counterparts across the country in creating megachurches – where thousands, sometimes tens of thousands, of parishioners worship together. But unlike the Protestant churches that use high-profile, evangelistic campaigns to grow, dioceses say it is too few priests and too many worshippers that drives their expansion. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals While the number of worshippers per parish nationwide has grown by nearly 35 percent in almost three decades, the number of priests dropped 26 percent, said Mary Gautier with the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University, which tracks U.S. Catholic Church growth patterns. “That’s the reality in the Catholic Church today: You don’t want to build something that will be OK for now, when you know this large population is going to get bigger,” Gautier said. Dioceses in the South and West – the hot spots for new jobs and suburban sprawl – are primarily the ones building larger parishes that are increasingly filled with Hispanic Catholics, many of whom are immigrants, Gautier said. The Midwest and Northeast are generally consolidating, Gautier said, due largely to population shifts to other regions of the country. Gautier said several dioceses, including the Archdiocese of San Antonio, seek at least 1,000 seats in design plans for new or expanded sanctuaries. Most sanctuaries used to be built with about 500 seats, she said. In the San Antonio archdiocese, at least 15 sanctuaries have doubled or tripled to at least 1,000 seats in the past eight years. “We didn’t want to put two parishes in the same town because we just didn’t have the priests to do it,” said Monsignor Larry Stuebben, vicar general of the archdiocese. Making a church bigger also drives down the average cost per church member, according to the Georgetown University research group. The research group estimates that it costs $444 per household nationwide for memberships in churches with fewer than 800 members compared to $337 for those with more than 1,000. The savings helps pay for more paid lay staff, who are increasingly picking up administrative duties to free priests for pastoral and sacramental duties, said the Rev. Larry Christian, rector of Assumption Seminary in San Antonio. “You have to have a large enough economic base to make that happen,” he said. The 65 million-member U.S. Catholic Church has generally tried to avoid the “megachurch” model, like Joel Osteen’s Lakewood Church in Houston that took over the former arena for the Houston Rockets NBA team and fills it each week with more than 30,000 congregants. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops advises parishes to avoid “any semblance of a theater or an arena” in worship settings. While new Catholic churches are designed with a larger seating capacity, the pews are curved around the altar so people don’t lose a sense of intimacy during worship, said Jim Moroney, head of liturgy for the Catholic bishops conference. “The challenges are indeed significant,” Moroney said. “But we want to create sight lines to see the whites in someone’s eyes when we’re preaching to them.” And large parishes are offering more programming, especially Bible study and social action groups, so members meet one another and create a community within a community, Moroney said. That programming makes them more like Protestant megachurches, said Scott Thumma, who specializes in megachurch research at Connecticut’s Hartford Seminary. The nation’s 1,200 Protestant megachurches, defined as having at least 2,000 weekly attendees, make small group participation the crux of their organizational structure, he said. “Anything that goes beyond just a large gathering – such as using small groups to create a congregational life with their members – that’s a significant shift in the organization of a Catholic congregation,” Thumma said. St. Mark advertises its 40-plus ministries and small groups on a large sign over the main entrance to the sanctuary, including a first-ever Bible study that breaks members into groups of eight to 10. The church considered splitting into two congregations in the early 1990s because regularly 200 people would have to stand in aisles in its 750-seat sanctuary during its weekend Masses, longtime member Marybeth Green said. “It was competition to get a seat and parking spot, and that’s not the Christian spirit,” she said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Why Ian Holloway would be perfect for the Swansea job

first_imgThere’s no doubt in my mind that Ian Holloway would be the right man to take over from Brendan Rodgers at Swansea.The likes of Dennis Bergkamp and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer have been linked with the job and while they are big names who achieved a lot as players, I think Ollie has the edge in terms of experience. He’s also an excellent man-manager.Most importantly, he would continue the brand of football Rodgers and Roberto Martinez introduced at Swansea.I certainly wouldn’t have been able to say that about him a few years ago and I know he’d be the first to admit that.But the great thing about Ollie is that he’s developed so much as a manager and has embraced new ideas.During his time out of the game after he left Leicester, I went to see him at his house in Bristol and we spoke for ages about how his ideas had changed.OLLIE’S MANAGERIAL PATH1996-2001: Bristol Rovers2001-2006: QPR2006-2007: Plymouth2007-2008: LeicesterSince 2009: BlackpoolWhen I played under him at QPR he had a certain way of doing things, but since his experience at Leicester he’s taken stock.He’s studied the game and looked at new ways of doing things, and that’s been highlighted by what he’s done at Blackpool.When I visited him he said that he’d be a much better manager when he got back into the game. He realised what he’d been doing wrong and spoke passionately about the need to play a more open, expansive game.He wanted to get away from the old way of doing things, with 4-4-2 and balls into the channels. He’d studied forward-thinking coaches and talked about the 4-3-3 system he now favoured – a similar style to the one Rodgers has since used at Swansea.He was saying to me ‘Imagine how good you’d be in a system like that’ – this from the man who’d previously wanted Dan Shittu to bang the ball forward as early as possible and favoured the kind of anti-football a lot of managers focus on these days.When he got the job at Blackpool, I spent pre-season training with them and saw at first hand the immediate impact he had there.It was a surprise to many people how well they did in his first season, but I’d seen straightaway that he really meant business and had come back a much more complete manager.One of his great strengths is his excellent man-management skills– and that’s really important. He’s down-to-earth and deals with players in the right way.Yes, someone like Bergkamp, who was brought up on total football at Ajax, would have a lot of gravitas. But would he be able to man-manage at a club where there are no obvious stars?Ollie definitely would be able to get the best out of that group of players. He’d be ideal in that respect.I also know from my time as a Cardiff player that there’s an intensity in Wales that any manager of Swansea will need to understand.Again, I think Ollie is well equipped. He has the personality to manage in that environment and also has experience from his years in Bristol, where there’s something similar with City and Rovers.Ollie’s done a brilliant job at Blackpool with the resources he’s had there and definitely deserves another crack at the Premier League.I also think having someone continue the Rodgers-Martinez way is really important – not only for Swansea, but for football in this country.We need more managers who play football the way it should be played.Modern-day managers seem to be moving in the opposite direction, but the modern-day Ian Holloway is a refreshing alternative.He’d be great for Swansea and Swansea would be great for him. It’s the perfect fit. Follow Richard Langley on Twitterlast_img read more

More Early Man Troubles (Again)

first_imgBones have a way of whacking the stories made up about them.Several problems have come up in the news about human evolution.Homo naledi: John Hawks is frustrated that nobody has settled on a date for this South African cave dweller. The latest guess is 912,000 years, but that’s too young for many, given its supposedly primitive state. If it really lived that late, according to Charles Q. Choi on Live Science, paleoanthropologists will have to change their picture of human evolution. It would mean early Africa was a melting pot of species that lived around the same time, not one species evolving to replace another on the advance to modernity. This is not an exact science, mind you:Collard said he expected this new age estimate would draw a lot of skepticism from other scientists. “Their skepticism will be entirely understandable,” he said. “Even now, I remain a bit skeptical about it. I think it’s well-enough supported to put it out there, but I’m not about to bet my house on it. That said, I think it’s worth the field pondering the implications for our understanding of human evolution if the age estimate is about right and H. naledi is around a million years old.”Homo floresiensis: Evidence that modern humans were using fire on the same island as the famous “hobbit” humans only 41,000 years ago tosses new confusion into the picture in Indonesia. The “rather unexpected” finding, according to PhysOrg, might help explain why the hobbits disappeared, assuming the moderns drove them to extinction. But why modern, physically and mentally capable people would limit themselves to a life of building campfires from 41,000 years ago to 24,000 years ago without making cities and farms remains a conundrum (see 6/10/16). 17,000 years of that kind of simple life is longer than all recorded human history from villages to the space age.Homo sapiens in Borneo: A specimen found in a Borneo cave is “full of surprises,” PhysOrg writes. Why? “A new study of the 37,000-year old remains of the ‘Deep Skull’ – the oldest modern human discovered in island South-East Asia – has revealed this ancient person was not related to Indigenous Australians, as had been originally thought,” the article says. That’s surprise one. “The Deep Skull was also likely to have been an older woman, rather than a teenage boy.” That’s surprise two. In fact, the bones look like the people of Borneo today. So other than getting the gender, age, and relations wrong, is everything else hunky-dory? “Our analysis overturns long-held views about the early history of this region.”On The Conversation, Robert Foley from Cambridge asserts that “we have been looking at human evolution the wrong way.” Who’s we, paleface? you might be asking, looking at the photo of a museum ape-man at the beginning of his piece.Understanding exactly how and why humans evolved is clearly one of the most important goals in science. But despite a significant amount of research to date, these questions have remained a bit of a mystery. Of course, there is no shortage of theories – it has even been suggested that humans are just visiting aliens. However, most of the credible models tend to take something that is unique to humans – such as language – and show how all the other bits of being human derive from that.So does Foley have a better theory to offer? Not really; his ideas are a hodgepodge of gradualism, mosaicism and cooperation. He thinks most of our ancestors were small folk. “We may picture our ancestors as rugged versions of ourselves, tall and strong, but they were not,” he claims. “We need to start thinking of them as creatures that were as unique as ourselves, but in different ways.” If we need to “start thinking” of them differently, it implies we (that is, anthropologists) “have been thinking” of them incorrectly. His conclusion: more research is needed.Why do we listen to these guys? They keep changing their stories. They don’t know what they are talking about. The long ages are concocted to keep Charlie’s story going, facts or not.Collard wants us to be skeptical, so be skeptical. Take a look at the record book. It makes perfect sense. People don’t sit around in caves for hundreds of thousands of years. They spread out and achieve great things. It’s what we do today; it’s what humans have always done. (Visited 58 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Dark Matter Hunt Comes Up Empty Again

first_imgPhysicists face a philosophical quandary. Something they deeply wish to believe in does not appear to exist.What happens when your theory requires something but you can’t find it? That’s the situation with dark matter. Scientists around the world have built ultra-sensitive detectors deep in mines to look for “weakly interacting massive particles” (WIMPs) that would theoretically explain why galaxies and galaxy clusters move the way they do. Dark matter is also an essential ingredient for the leading big bang theory. But the most sensitive test ever cannot find it.Photograph of dark matter. Frame and white background provided for contrast.Experimental results from the XENON1T dark matter detector limit the effective size of dark matter particles to 4.1 x 10-47 square centimeters — one-trillionth of one-trillionth of a centimeter squared — the most stringent limit yet determined for dark matter as established by the world’s most sensitive detector.The results, presented Monday in a seminar in Italy at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS), were produced using an active target volume of 1,300 kilograms of Xenon, the first search for dark matter that has monitored the equivalent of one ton of xenon for an entire year.“We now have the tightest limit for what is known as ‘the WIMP-nucleon cross section,’ which is a measure of the effective size of dark matter, or how strongly it interacts with normal matter,” said Ethan Brown, a member of the XENON Collaboration, and assistant professor of physics, applied physics, and astronomy at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “With these results, we have now tested many new theoretical models of dark matter and placed the strongest constraints on these models to date.“Physicists don’t like to say that dark matter is not there. They prefer saying they have placed tighter limits on where it could be hiding. Space.com makes the same dodge. Nature is more blunt: “Dark matter detector draws a blank.”The world’s largest experiment intended to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) has come up empty-handed after collecting data for nearly a year. XENON1T is located 1.4 kilometres underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in central Italy. The experiment looks out for the tiny flashes of light that should be given off when WIMPs — a popular candidate for dark matter, which is thought to make up 85% of the Universe’s matter — collide with atoms in 1,300 kilograms of cold liquid xenon. On 28 May, researchers from the XENON1T collaboration reported at seminars held simultaneously at Gran Sasso and at CERN, Europe’s particle-physics laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, that no such flashes were detected. The data suggest that WIMPs — if they exist — interact even more weakly with ordinary matter than previously thought.This is like saying that ‘ghosts, if they exist, are faster at escaping from our glances than previously thought.’ The hunt is in a vicious cycle:Dark matter must exist.Build a more sensitive detector.No dark matter found.Return to Step One.Any particle as small as 4.1 x 10-47 square centimeters is, for all practical purposes, non-existent. That’s almost a trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a square centimeter! An electron (10-16 cm) is inconceivably gigantic by comparison. This doesn’t mean that the proposed particle is that small, but its “effective size” or ability to interact with normal matter makes it that small, practically speaking. WIMPs were thought to be quite large, actually (massive), but the “collisional cross section” (size of the interaction target) has now been so narrowed by this latest search that a successful collision would be like hitting a bull’s-eye on earth much smaller than an electron with a dart thrown from another galaxy. And yet these same theoretical particles are proposed to exert so much gravity that they hold galaxy clusters together and keep the big bang from disrupting the fabric of spacetime.Will physicists and cosmologists ever quit their so-far vain attempt to find the mysterious unknown stuff? Quitting would be a huge blow to modern physics. It would mean admitting that the Standard Model is incomplete or, at worst, wrong. A scientific revolution may be in the making.Update 6/02/18: Two physicists at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, one of them astronomer Avi Loeb, are assigning properties to dark matter. According to Space.com, they are speculating whether dark matter particles carry an electric charge. Perhaps they should discover the particles first. “The thought that dark matter could somehow be electrically charged seems too bizarre to be anything but science fiction,” reporter Chelsea Gohd admits. The two astronomers base their speculation on one possible interpretation from an instrument called EDGES that measured a particular absorption spectrum in the cosmic background radiation. Still, they confess, “The nature of dark matter is one of the biggest mysteries in science, and we need to use any related new data to tackle it.”We’ve been watching this hunt for years, curious to see how it turns out (e.g., 20 Jan, 2002, 23 July 2007, 9 Jan 2017; search on “dark matter” for more). We’ve used the case of the Mysterious Unknown Stuff (MUST) that must be there as a test of empiricism vs theory. So far, empiricism is winning. Don’t even ask about dark energy. That stuff is even more mysterious, and physicists don’t even have a theory of what it could possibly be. It’s like watching serious scientists in our own time trying to defend belief in ghosts (30 Aug 2016).The search recalls physicists’ vain attempts to look for phlogiston as the cause of combustion, or caloric as the carrier of heat. Those two historical non-detections of the 18th century led to scientific revolutions of their own (the oxygen theory, and the mechanical theory of heat). Some of the champions of those occult substances went to their deaths without admitting they were wrong. Are we seeing another case of it now?We cannot rule out a successful detection. Physicists did find the Higgs boson, didn’t they? Well, at these levels of constraint, any seemingly empirical results become so theory-laden, it’s difficult to ascertain whether they found a real particle or another version of the theory that they can keep believing in. Does that recall a situation in biology? Darwinism, perhaps? (Visited 627 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa to host WEF Africa 2013

first_img12 April 2013 South Africa is to host the 23rd World Economic Forum on Africa in May, having last hosted the meeting of regional and global business, political and civil society leaders focusing on the continent in 2009. The meeting will be held at the Cape Town International Convention Centre from 8 to 10 May under the theme “delivering on Africa’s promise”. According to the WEF, the three-day event will provide an important platform for delegates “to deepen the continent’s integration agenda and renew commitment to a sustainable path of growth and development”. “With an expected annual growth of 5% in 2012-2013, sub-Saharan Africa continues its transformative journey from a developing continent to a hub of global growth,” the WEF says on its website. “According to the World Bank, almost half of Africa’s countries have attained middle-income status. At the same time, the continent’s positive outlook is threatened by fluctuating commodity prices, rising inequality and youth unemployment. “To build on its achievements, Africa’s leaders need to strengthen the continent’s competitiveness, foster inclusive growth and build resilience in a volatile global environment. Accelerating economic diversification, boosting strategic infrastructure and unlocking talent are critical success factors in this new leadership context.” South Africa’s Presidency said on Thursday that forum participants would engage with issues such as strengthening the continent’s competitiveness, creating inclusive and sustainable growth, and accelerating infrastructure development and economic diversification. “The above themes consolidate the previous ones discussed during the 22nd World Economic Forum on Africa in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, which focused on leadership, innovation and shared opportunities as well as increasing investment in frontier markets,” the Presidency said in a statement. “The government of South Africa expresses its full support and commitment to the event, and encourages all relevant participating sectors to take part in making this event a resounding success.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

4 Tough Conversations You Must Have to Succeed in Sales

first_imgWe like selling when it’s collaborative, when we get to help our clients through their process. We don’t like it so much when we have to deal with the inherent conflict that is part of sales and selling. If you are going to succeed in sales, you are going to have to be comfortable and confident having some tough conversations. Here are four of them.Time: The very first conversation you have with your dream client is tough conversation. You have to ask them for the commitment of time so you can explore working with them. They have to deny your request because they are too busy, they’ve said no to everyone else, it wouldn’t be fair, and they’re certain you aren’t going to make it worth their while. You want to be collaborative, but the very first conversation begins with your client telling you “no” and you refusing their very first request. If you want in, you have to have this conversation.Access: Once your past that first tough conversation, you have to ask for access. You need access to information, and if you are really good, information no one else has asked for. You also need access to additional stakeholders. Your new contact struggles to give you information. What do you need it for? What are you going to do with it? No one else has asked for it? She struggles to give you access to other stakeholders. Why do we need them? What if they take control of this project? What if I lose the relationship? If you want access, you have to have this conversation.What’s Right: Your dream client thinks he knows what he wants. But he’s wrong. What he wants isn’t going to solve his problem, and it isn’t going to deliver the result he believes it will. But he believes it nonetheless. You have to tell him he can’t have what he wants, it won’t work, and why you don’t want to give it to him. If you want to really serve your client as a consultative salesperson and trusted advisor, you have to engage here.Price: Your price is higher than your competitors. It’s higher than what the client is paying now. But it is the right investment to produce the right result. But still, your client pushes back. He wants a lower price. He wants to compare you to your competitors, none of who can deliver what you deliver. If you are going to win at the price that delivers results, you have to talk about the right investment.last_img read more

Google dedicates doodle to 2012 London Olympics

first_imgThe latest Google doodle celebrates the world’s biggest sporting extravaganza, the Olympics.The Olympics open in London on Friday.The doodle highlights football, swimming, athletics, javelin throw, fencing and basketball.The 2012 Summer Olympics will see 81 Indian athletes taking part in 13 disciplines in the Games that will be held from July 27 to Aug 12.last_img