Tilltson Fund grants $71,590 to Lyndon State College

first_imgSource: LSC. 9.16.2009 Lyndon State College is the recipient of a $71, 590 grant from the Neil and Louise Tillotson Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, Northern Region. The money will be used for paid student internships in Essex County in Vermont and Coos County in New Hampshire. These two areas fall in one of the nation’s most economically depressed regions, and this support will help businesses develop sustainable business models.The grant creates a promising win-win situation for businesses and Lyndon students. Not only will the businesses have access to the latest in planning and development, but students will no longer have to choose between an unpaid internship and a job.Making these types of internship opportunities available is important to both preparing the region’s future workforce as well as helping these students play an active role in building the capacity of businesses and organizations that could become their future employers. The struggling economies of the Northeast Kingdom and Coos County provide an excellent laboratory for Lyndon State College students. By working under the close supervision of experienced faculty who are coordinating with engaged employers they will have the opportunity to put theory into practice while helping to keep and create jobs in the target area.This summer, for example, Lyndon State College senior Ashley Beard and two interns from Mt. Abraham Union High School worked under a Tillotson grant to map parts of the Northern Forest. This information will make the land more accessible to businesses who have questions about types and locations of specific kinds of timber on the land. Other Tillotson money has been used by the College for work with the Northwoods Stewardship Center and the Appalachian Mountain Club.The focus of this internship program will be to help put into practice the recommendations outlined in the SEI’s (Sustainable Economy Initiative) A Strategy for Regional Economic Resurgence while developing regional capacity along with that of participating businesses and organizations. Small and emerging companies, as well as nonprofits, are often unable to pay interns, which limits the pool from which the businesses can choose. Making these types of internship opportunities available is important to both preparing the region’s future workforce as well as helping these students play an active role in building the capacity of businesses and organizations that could become their future employers. The struggling economies of the Northeast Kingdom and Coos County provide an excellent laboratory for Lyndon State College students.The New Hampshire Charitable Foundation has been improving the quality of life in our communities since 1962. It builds and manages a collection of charitable funds totaling nearly $490 million, created by individuals, families and corporations. The Foundation has awarded more than $125 million in the past five years. Based in Concord, N.H., the Foundation roots itself in communities across the state through seven regions including Lakes, Manchester, Monadnock, Nashua, North Country, Piscataqua and the Upper Valley.last_img read more

​Nordic roundup: Velliv, Storebrand, European infrastructure

first_imgAs it was now fully-owned by its customers, and as an integrated part of Danish business, Velliv said, the company would increase its focus on social responsibility factors including responsible investment and sustainability, which it said was a natural thing to do as one of Denmark’s largest institutional investors.The association has been stepping up its ownership of the former Nordea subsidiary in stages over the past three years, targeting full ownership by buying shares from the bank.Scandinavian investors invest €215m in European infra fundScandinavian pensions and insurance firms have invested around €215m in a European equity infrastructure fund managed by Allianz Capital Partners, Allianz Global Investors (AllianzGI) announced.The Allianz European Infrastructure Fund (AEIF) reached its final close after raising €860m and being heavily oversubscribed, AllianzGI said, with Scandinavian pensions and insurance firms accounting for more than a quarter of these commitments.Investments made by the fund are to be funded by both the AEIF and Allianz insurance companies, with the latter contributing at least 50% of invested capital, said AllianzGI, adding that the focus would be on energy, transportation and communication infrastructure providing essential services for the public.Erik Rosensvard, Allianz GI’s head of business development Nordics, said: “Our institutional clients show a strong appetite to invest equity into infrastructure projects together with Allianz.“In this respect, it is an advantage that the seed investment will be undertaken in a Scandinavian country,” he added.AEIF has already made its first investment in Finland’s second largest electricity distribution company Elenia, according to AllianzGI.Storebrand triples fossil-free assetsNorwegian pension provider Storebrand has now almost tripled its fossil-free assets following a divestment decision by its Swedish subsidiary SPP.The move means a third of group assets under management, €26bn, will exclude fossil fuel companies once the SPP move is complete, the firm announced at the COP 25 climate conference in Madrid.Odd Arild Grefstad, Storebrand Group chief executive officer, said: “We believe that companies with a strategy in line with the UN global goals and Paris Agreement will create better returns in the long run.“Along with all other sectors, the financial sector must recognise its important role in channeling investments into low carbon solutions,” he added.Staffan Hansén, CEO of SPP Pension & Insurance, said the pension industry had a natural and important role to play in tackling climate change.“Half of the money on the world’s stock exchanges is pensions money, and capital flows from fossil fuels are likely to accelerate faster than you think,” he said.SPP also cited financial reasons for the divestment, such as the likelihood of increased carbon dioxide tax for companies in the future.Storebrand said it had joined the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance, along with 15 other asset owners, who pledge to achieve net-zero carbon investment portfolios by 2050. Danish pension provider Velliv has announced it is now 100% owned by its customers, after its holding company bought the remainder of shares in the company from the Nordic financial group Nordea.The shares were bought by Velliv Association (Velliv Foreningen), which is owned by the 350,000 customers of Velliv, the former Nordea Life and Pension Denmark, as it lifted its stake in the operating company to 100% from 81%.Peter Gæmelke, Velliv Association chair, said: “The Velliv Association has today become the sole owner of Velliv.”“Now all of Velliv’s profits go to the Velliv Association, which pays a cash bonus to members and supports non-profit mental health efforts,” he said.last_img read more

Pacquiao withdraws from November fight with Horn

first_img(THE Sports Xchange) – Manny Pacquiao has pulled out of his proposed November rematch with Jeff Horn for the WBO welterweight title because of government duties.Pacquiao, a senator in the Philippines, is unavailable for the proposed November 12 bout due to the conflict, the Australian promoters of the fight announced yesterday.Horn upset Pacquiao for the WBO welterweight title in a unanimous 12-round decision in Brisbane, Australia, on July 2.“On behalf of the Philippines government, he (Pacquiao) will be part of a delegation that will visit China in the middle of his proposed preparation period for the fight,” said Dean Lonergan, who is Horn’s promoter. “Pacquiao is committed to fighting again in 2018 and a rematch with Jeff Horn for the WBO world welterweight title.”The proposed rematch in Brisbane had been confirmed by both camps on August 21. The fight was expected to be held at the same outdoor stadium in Brisbane where a hometown crowd of 51 000 saw Horn, a former school teacher, stun Pacquiao for the WBO welterweight belt.The 38-year-old Pacquiao said after the fight that he wanted a rematch. He disagreed with the judges’ decision and asked the World Boxing Organisation for a review, but the WBO later endorsed the 29-year-old Horn as the winner.Jesse Vargas, an American contender and former world title-holder, could possibly take Pacquiao’s place for a fight later this year against Horn, the promoters said. Pacquiao beat Vargas in a unanimous decision last November in Las Vegas.last_img read more