QPR tipped to table bid for United outcast Berbatov

first_imgQPR want to sign Dimitar Berbatov from Manchester United, The Times report.It is suggested that Rangers are preparing a £5m bid for the Bulgarian, who has been widely tipped to leave Old Trafford this summer.Tottenham are considering a £7.5m bid for Liverpool winger Raheem Sterling, according to the Daily Mail.The 17-year-old from Harlesden has been linked with a loan move back to QPR, who lost him when he secured a transfer to Anfield in 2010.But it is claimed that Spurs are looking to sign him on a permanent basis.The Mail also say Chelsea are preparing a final offer of £7.5m for Wigan star Victor Moses, having had three bids for him rejected.This page is regularly updated. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Will Dodgers’ interest in Bryce Harper impact Giants’ pursuit?

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSCOTTSDALE, Ariz.–After months of downplaying their interest in free agent outfielder Bryce Harper, a Giants contingent featuring Larry Baer, Farhan Zaidi and Bruce Bochy tried to sneak into Las Vegas at the beginning of February.Their mission to remain undercover during a meeting with Harper and agent Scott Boras was unsuccessful, leading to weeks of speculation over whether the Giants would commit to a long-term …last_img read more

State of the Nation: all eyes on Zuma

first_img13 February 2014All eyes will be on President Jacob Zuma on Thursday night as he delivers the sixth and final State of the Nation address of the current administration. The speech will be delivered to a joint sitting of Parliament in Cape Town at 7pm, and broadcast live on national radio and television.SAnews features editor Chris Bathembu takes a glance at the highlights of Zuma’s previous five addresses.2009It was a cold winter afternoon on 3 June 2009 when Zuma delivered his first State of the Nation speech following the elections of that year. The world economy was reeling from the effects of the recession. More than 900 000 South Africans had lost their jobs between 2008 and 2009, while some companies continued to cut staff due to rising costs of oil and energy.It was not going to be an easy speech for Zuma. Some cringed when he announced that between June and December 2009, the economy would have created about 500 000 job opportunities. The key element to the jobs drive would be the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP), which had achieved an initial target of one-million jobs by 2009.Zuma also knew that something needed to be done fast to cushion the poor from the aftermath of the most devastating economic crisis since the great depression. He announced the introduction of the training layoff scheme. Though it was met with opposition from Cosatu and the National Youth Development Agency, the plan would help to protect workers who would ordinarily have faced retrenchment. Companies in distress would also be assisted to train inexperienced workers. In the end, these workers would, instead of being retrenched, be kept in employment for a period of time and re-skilled.Zuma also announced that a scaled-up Industrial Policy Action Plan would be developed. The lead sectors in this were to be the automotive, chemicals, metal fabrication, tourism, clothing and textiles, and forestry sectors.This paved the way for the development of the New Growth Path (NGP) a year later. The NGP identified five key priorities, namely education, health, the fight against crime, creating decent work, and rural development and land reform, which would form the focal point for the rest of the five-year term of the current administration.Zuma ended that speech by saying: “Since the implementation of our programme will take place in the face of the economic downturn, we will have to act prudently. No wastage, no rollovers of funds – every cent must be spent wisely and fruitfully. We must cut our cloth according to our size.”2010It was 11 February, and this speech was to be delivered in the evening and broadcast on national television, to allow working people to follow it from home. There was much hype around it, as the date coincided with the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in 1990.As expected, Zuma began his address by reminding South Africans of Mandela’s release, a watershed moment in the country’s history. Then it was down to the business of the day.Zuma reminded the nation that the global economic crisis had cost the economy about 900 000 jobs. He announced that to provide a safety cushion for the poor, the government would extend its child support grant to children over 14 years of age, and over the following three years to children aged 15 to 18 years.More than 480 000 public works job opportunities had been created, he said, which was 97% of the target set the previous year. The jobs were in construction, home and community-based care, and environmental projects.Zuma’s major announcement for 2010 was the R846-billion he said the government would spend on public infrastructure. The New Growth Path, he added, had been adopted as the official framework for economic policy and the driver of the country’s jobs strategy.Zuma also announced that all grade 3, 6 and 9 pupils would henceforth write literacy and numeracy tests that were independently moderated. The government had set a target of increasing the number of matric students who were eligible for university admission to 175 000 a year by 2014.Zuma wrapped up that speech by saying: “Inspired by our icon Madiba, it is my honour to dedicate this 2010 State of the Nation address to all our heroes and heroines, sung and unsung, known and unknown. Let us work together to make this year of action a successful one for our country.”2011This speech, delivered on 10 February, was all about jobs. Zuma announced the establishment of a Jobs Fund to the tune of R9-billion over three years to finance new job-creation initiatives. The Industrial Development Corporation had set aside R10-billion over five years for investment in economic activities with high job potential. Up to R20-billion was to go towards tax allowances or tax breaks to promote investments, expansions and upgrades in the manufacturing sector.Zuma also announced that South Africa had joined the Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC) grouping of influential emerging economies.He noted that more than 400 000 additional people had been connected to the country’s water supply the previous year, while about 81% of the country was now electrified, compared to 63% in the year 2000.About R44-million had been recovered from public servants illegally benefiting from housing subsidies. Just over 5-million HIV tests have been conducted since the launch of the testing campaign the previous April.Zuma concluded that speech by saying: “We must therefore act together as a united people, for national reconciliation, for nation building, for the birth of a new world.”2012This speech, delivered on 9 February, focused on several key things that government would have to do to grow the economy, introducing the National Development Plan (NDP) as key to the elimination of poverty and inequality over the next two decades.Zuma used this speech to report back on a number of issues. The Jobs Fund, which was announced in 2011, had begun operating and 2 500 applications had been received in the first round. Project allocations of over R1-billion had been committed. In addition, seven projects with an investment value of R8.4-billion had been approved for the R20-billion tax incentive announced in 2011.Transnet would invest R300-billion over seven years in capital projects. Of this amount, R200-billion had been allocated to rail projects and the balance to projects in the ports.Zuma said the state would develop a major new south-eastern node to improve the industrial and agricultural development and export capacity of the Eastern Cape and expand the province’s linkages with the Northern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. In the former Transkei, part of the Eastern Cape, a dam would be built using the Umzimvubu River as the source in order to expand agricultural production.More than 220 000 solar geysers had installed in homes nationwide. The target was one-million solar geysers by 2014-2015.Zuma wrapped up that speech with these words: “I would like to appeal to all our people to join hands as they always do, as we deal decisively with the triple challenge of unemployment, poverty and inequality. Nobody will do this for us, it is in our hands. And we are all equal to the task.”2013Zuma began this speech by referring to the crisis in the Eurozone, which is South Africa’s major trading partner, accounting for around 21 percent of the country’s exports.He also spoke at length about the National Development Plan (NDP), which outlines interventions to put the economy on a better footing. The speech set the target for job creation at 11-million by 2030 – while noting that the economy needed to grow threefold to create the desired jobs. Zuma said that the government would have spent about R860-billion rand on infrastructure since 2009. Various projects were being implemented around the country.The Judicial Commission of Inquiry, led by Judge Ian Farlam, had been appointed to probe the tragedy in Marikana, where more than 44 people were killed during a strike by miners.Investments amounting to R400-million in green economy projects had been approved for municipalities, other organs of state, community organisations and the private sector across all provinces.The Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences Units had secured over 363 life sentences, with a conviction rate of 73%, for crimes against women above 18 years old and 70% for crimes against children under 18 years of age.Zuma ended the speech by saying: “As South Africans, we should continue to have one primary goal – to make our country a truly great and prosperous nation.”Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Review: The HTC One M8 Is Android’s Cream Of The Crop

first_imgIf you’ve ever used a Moto X, you know you can check the time on the Active Display screen just by tilting the phone or picking it up off a table. The Moto X knows when you’re holding it and the gesture-based interaction made it the smartest of the smartphones when it came out last year. Other smartphones have similarly employed a swipe-from-offscreen interaction (Samsung Galaxy, BlackBerry 10, iPhone with iOS 7) model that allows users can access certain functions from behind a locked screen with a simple swiping.These instant-access interactions now come to the HTC One M8, with a swipe down from the top to open voice control, a swipe up from bottom to bring you to your last-used app, a swipe left to visit the home screen and a swipe right to BlinkFeed, HTC’s content feed screen. Like LG devices, if you double tap the screen from an off position (power on, screen off), it will take you to the locked home screen.Gesture control like this is not exactly a new concept; if anything, this is proves that HTC can take cool concepts from other phones and seamlessly incorporate them to create a unique user experience. The HTC One M8’s Dot View cases allow for easy gesture-specific controls while the front cover is closed. If you swipe down on the cover, HTC One M8’s voice system activates, and you can tell your phone who you want to call. If you double tap the case, you can see the time and weather at a glance. If you are a fan of cases (which I am not), the Dot View case is a cool conversation starter that employs an imaginative gesture-based user interface.Whining: Sense, Zoe, BlinkFeed, M8 Tags:#Android#Google#HTC#HTC One M8#HTC One M8 review#HTC Sense#Reviews Every so often, a product comes along and takes the best of almost everything that came before it and packages those things into a beautiful and functional device that’s hard not to admire. The HTC One M8 is such a product.Almost every smartphone comes with its fair share of warts, and the HTC One M8 is no different in that regard. But the M8 has learned from user behaviors and the competitive landscape, which amounts to an excellent device that stands atop the Android heap and next to (if not above) Apple’s iPhone or any Nokia Lumia available.A Company In FluxFor the second year in a row, HTC has built what will likely be one of the year’s best reviewed smartphones (if the M8 can withstand the competition over the rest of 2014), but the company’s revenue and market share remain flat.See also: How The HTC One M8 Smartphone Camera Performs In The Real WorldThe reason for HTC’s stagnation is open for debate. HTC will claim it hasn’t been able to effectively market its phones. The manufacturer recently just hired the Samsung marketer responsible for the “Next Big Thing” campaign but HTC cannot compete with Apple and Samsung in marketing dollars. Another argument is that HTC has been damaged by cellular operators that lust after exclusive agreements to carry a device. Maybe the decline has come from production and shipping delays of its last two flagship devices, or patent battles with the likes of Apple.In reality, HTC’s failures are a combination of all of the above. The question continually asked by pundits is whether the newest HTC flagship can pull the company out of the mire. At ReadWrite, we tend to believe in quality products, so the answer is a definite “maybe.” It’s hard to be positive knowing all the extenuating factors: Motorola made a great smartphone with the Moto X and hemorrhaged money until Google had to sell it to Lenovo. Nokia has done some fine work with the Lumia series and hemorrhaged money until it sold to Microsoft. If HTC is to fail with its own flagship smartphone, it represents a pox on all of the houses in the smartphone manufacturing world. A pox on Apple and Samsung for creating an anti-competitive market. A pox on HTC for failing to achieve the success that its design chops deserve. A pox on Google for allowing the maker of some of the best smartphones on the market to whither and die. So where does the HTC One M8 shine and where does it need to improve? Let’s break it down.Shining: Industrial Design & PerformanceAs long as the manufacturer is alive, HTC should take home the industrial design award basically every year.With all due respect to Apple and certain Nokia devices, the One series has been phenomenally designed over its three generations. The One M8 is a compact and beautiful phone with a full metal casing and no hard edges. Everything that was good about the original HTC One has been refined in the One M8, including the forward facing speakers, the slightly larger screen, the weight and the grip. From an aesthetic point of view, the One M8 is gorgeous.  dan rowinski Let’s just get one thing out of the way. The name “One M8” is just all kinds of terrible. The HTC One was originally codenamed the “M7” but the moniker was dropped before the phone was released. The “M8” moniker was the development codename for the device that somehow found its way into the actual product name. Good luck with that, HTC marketing.When it comes to skins—the unique user interfaces manufacturers add to Android smartphones—beauty is in the eye of the beholder. You may prefer the interface of the Samsung Galaxy S5 or one of LG’s G series smartphones. Some users (usually Android “purists”) prefer the Google Experience of Nexus devices. HTC employs what its calls HTC Sense. The sixth iteration of Sense is what is shipped with the One M8 and, yes, it does feature some improvements over the last version of the launcher. The gesture-based controls and contextual computing is technically part of Sense and those features definitely add to the positive experience and feature parity of the phone. At the same time, HTC—like Samsung—loves to push its marginal “features” that basically amount to a small mountain of frustrating and annoying features. For instance, Zoe is HTC’s dual-still-photo-plus-video-feature that is confusing to use and difficult to share. Zoe is like adding all of the motion and “best shot” features of other smartphone cameras (notably, the Samsung Galaxy S4 and Galaxy S5) into one setting within the camera app. The HTC One M8 camera is particularly good outside of Zoe, so I’d imagine most people won’t need to use this setting. To note, these types of frailties are of the nitpicking variety. Even the Google Experience Nexus devices have the Google Now home screen you can’t really get rid of if you want. The Galaxy S5 has a magazine-like homescreen pre-loaded onto the device. These device-specific feeds are popular on Android products right now. Similar less-than-stellar user experiences exist in just about any device you pick up, from the iPhone to any Windows Phone to the Nexus 5, Moto X, LG G2, Sony Xperia, or Galaxy S5.Overall, the HTC One M8 packages excellent industrial design with a more refined user experience that its predecessor which makes for an excellent Android-based smartphone. If you like Android, you are probably going to dig the HTC One M8. It’s the best of Android and the best of HTC together in one sterling device. Related Posts Sense 6 also employs the next version of HTC’s “BlinkFeed,” a feature that takes an entire homescreen to act as a social feed and newsreader.BlinkFeed in Sense 6 is actually much improved from that found in the last version of Sense shipped with the HTC One in 2013, allowing users to add more customized feeds and publications. But the same basic problem exists with BlinkFeed in Sense 6 as it did in Sense 5: You cannot delete it and maintain an additional customizable home screen. You can either have BlinkFeed or you don’t. You can’t get rid of it to add an extra screen and HTC Sense 6 only allows for five homescreens (unlike Google Experience Android which will let users add as many as they like).You can delete BlinkFeed, as Phil Nickinson explains in the video from Android Central below, but note that once you get rid of BlinkFeed, you lose the ability to access that panel unless you want the feed back.center_img What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The camera on the HTC One M8 is a little hit-and-miss, but overall it is a marked improvement over the HTC One camera that introduced the concept of “ultrapixels” into the popular lexicon, confusing the heck out of smartphone buyers everywhere. (See our full review of the HTC One M8’s camera here.)Gestures & The Pixel CaseThe HTC One M8 is highly similar to its predecessor, but it also comes with a few new features. Gesture control and screen tapping should be familiar to Android users that have used either a Moto X or LG G2, while the chic pixel case—known as Dot View—is a curiosity all on its own.  The performance of the One M8 is none too shabby. The One M8 employs the top-of-the-line Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 quad-core processor and it shows up in just about everything that can be done on the phone. From taking pictures (more on the camera below) to switching between CPU-intensive apps, the One M8 is on top of the “superphone” hardware spectrum that essentially puts a powerful PC in your pocket. Given that the One M8’s release comes in the first half of 2014, it will likely be eclipsed in the hardware department by the end of the year, but right now it is fast and responsive and has the ability to run just about any app you might want … and then some.The One M8 is also successful in two areas consumers greatly care about: The screen, and the battery life. The HTC One M8’s 5-inch, 440 ppi display is notably crisper than last year’s model and comparative to other Android flagships within the past 12 months, including the Samsung Galaxy S5. And its battery (2,600 mAh) is only slightly bigger than last year’s (2,300 mAh) design, but the performance is much improved and also comes with a built-in battery saver function that Samsung Galaxy device owners may be familiar with.Let me give you an example of the HTC One M8’s battery life. This past weekend, I traveled with the One M8 while driving down to Washington, D.C., from Boston. Starting from a full charge, the One M8 went to the zoo and snapped many pictures (especially of Bao Bao the giant panda) that were automatically uploaded to Google+, found me directions to get home, played Spotify for about five hours and then helped me navigate around traffic on the George Washington Bridge.In all, the One M8 withstood a solid nine hours of non-stop activity, and still had about 9% of its life left. A quick refresh with an external charger and the battery jumped back up to 26% and played Spotify for another four hours to get me back to Boston. The HTC One could not have performed this feat (though the Galaxy S5 may have). Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

When Little Data Is Bigger Than Big Data

first_imgBig Data is all the rage. And with good reason, too. There is so much data being created, captured, sorted, sifted through, analyzed, reported, sold, and shared that extraordinary business insights are inevitable. And we’re just getting started.But not so fast! With all this trumpeting of the “new” new thing, let’s not forget about what’s really important: Little Data.Little DataBig Data is the aggregated data from lots of individual consumer transactions (as well as all of the rest of the data in the digital wake now trailing behind each of us). The data is being used to determine how to sell to individuals and businesses. But you already have Little Data, and that Little Data can help you serve your clients and dream clients now.Over time, you’ve captured your client’s communication preferences. You know that they prefer phone calls to email, or in some cases, they prefer a text message. You know that they like a follow up call when they place an order. You know that sometimes they need to see your face, and sometimes they just want you to listen. You’ve got information about your client’s communication preferences in your sales force automation software right now.You’ve also captured information about your client’s ordering patterns. You know the big shifts in their business, their peak season, and their client’s ordering patterns. You’ve got this information in your system now.You have a lot of data about your clients at your fingertips now.Context and InsightIf you’ve done a reasonably good job capturing information from all of the interactions you’ve had with your clients and dream clients, you’ve also got something Big Data doesn’t necessarily give you: context.I bought my son the Hellsing videos on Amazon.com. I think I bought two separate sets of videos. Now, Amazon is recommending I buy all kinds of cartoons and manga. The data collected doesn’t come with context. It doesn’t recognize that I am not my son, that the videos were a reward for good grades, and that they are cluttering my experience with what their data tells them I want to buy. It’s not the perfect analogy, but Amazon’s algorithm says that if I bought Helsing, I am interested the stuff that other Hellsing buyers bought.You, on the other hand, know why your clients ordered what they ordered, when they’ll need to order it again, and how they might do better by doing something different.You are all the time collecting and capturing data about your clients and your dream clients. But to make this Little Data work for you, you have to use it to generate insights, ideas, and value for your clients and your dream clients. Sometimes Little Data is more powerful than Big Data.QuestionsWhat little data do you collect?What do you know about your clients that helps to you serve them better than anyone else could?What ideas and insights does your insight give you?Is your Little Data as important as any Big Data? Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Nowlast_img read more

Why Your Dream Client Wants a Lower Price

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now It is easier to find a lower price than it is to make the changes that improve your performance. This is why so many of your prospective customers are laser-focused on price.It’s easier to find someone to reduce the price you pay than to change what you believe. It’s easier to believe that your vendor, your supplier, your partner, or your whatever isn’t doing the job that they should be. This belief is reinforced continually by the salespeople who promise to deliver better, faster, and cheaper. Real change requires that you first believe that a lower price doesn’t deliver better results and the real issue is something else.Finding a lower price is easier than investing more in the outcome you need. You don’t have to have the messy, complicated internal conversations. You don’t have to justify the greater expense. And you don’t have to deal with the risk, especially the personal and professional risk that you take by recommending dealing with the real obstacle to greater performance. Real change often means increasing the investment you make in the outcomes you need. Cheaper is easier.It’s easier to find a lower price than it is to change the way you do business. It’s easier not to buck the status quo and not to change any of the processes that make up “the way we’ve always done it around here.” The fact that you’ve done something one for as long as you have is proof positive that what you’re doing isn’t broken. It’s easier to believe that someone or something else needs to change. A new vendor with a lower price isn’t change.When you think about building consensus inside your dream client’s account, know that a lower price is always going to be easier than what you are asking for when you ask for a real commitment to change. This why you need the support from the CEO of the Problem, and you still need executive sponsorship. You need the help and support of the people who are willing to choose the harder road, the road that leads them better results.A lower price is easy. Better outcomes are difficult. You are defined by which of these you choose to sell.last_img read more

Ken Wilber on Stages of Development and How They Show Up in The Business World  – Episode #69

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 57:58 — 53.2MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSS“Stages of development” is a term you hear more in the philosophical and psychological realms than you do in the business realm. But Anthony has come to believe that a better understanding of human development and these “stages” we go through in our growth is very beneficial for sales and business leaders. This episode is a deep dive into psychological and philosophical theories surrounding this idea of “stages of development.” Anthony’s aim is to help you better understand yourself as a business or sales leader and to better know your team members and clients, so that you can better help your customers and work with your team, for greater success.Ken Wilber on Stages of Development and How They Show Up in The Business World – Episode #69Click To TweetWhat IS consciousness?Anthony starts this conversation with Ken Wilber by asking perhaps the deepest question of all: “What IS consciousness?” On one hand, Ken says that defining consciousness is not all that difficult. In his thinking, anytime you are aware of something, conscious of something, you’re experiencing consciousness.  For most of us, it is primarily associated with the “I” dimension of how we think about the world; the things we think about in relationship to ourselves. But there are others that think of consciousness in terms of “it.” It’s an objective structure of thinking that is strictly related to brain function and physiological process. On this episode Anthony chats with Ken about the reality of consciousness and how our thinking about it impacts the way we approach relationships with others – which can dramatically impact sales.Understanding the stages of growth can help you discern your customer’s motives and goals.Philosophers and psychologists categorize human development into stages of growth and try to label them in ways that describe what’s going on in the human psyche during that stage. For example, there are stages of growth that are entirely focused on the self, others that expand to include a concern about immediate community, and then even further during another stage to think about the broader world. As a sales or business leader, if you’re able to discern how your customer is thinking (which of those stages of growth they are operating out of), you’ll be better able to address the concerns they are likely to have as you interact about your sales solution.Understanding the stages of growth can help you discern your customer’s motives and goalsClick To TweetDo you understand where your team members are at in their developmental growth?If you can make that leap and begin to grasp their motivations and desires (based on their stage of growth) you’ll be able to lead them, motivate them, and energize them more effectively through the messaging, encouragement, and coaching you provide. That’s because you’ll have the ability to tailor your approach to each person to best fit into their view of the world at that time. You can hear this deep dive conversation about personal and cultural development as Anthony chats with Ken Wilber, on this episode.How we see the stages of development showing up in the business world.The importance of understanding the stages of development that people go through not only has to do with how to lead better, but also how to BE a better leader. For example, If a leader is stuck in an egocentric stage of growth they’ll clearly be leveraging things to their own advantage, which could impact the health and success of the company and clients. It’s an incredibly in depth conversation on this episode but is also filled with practical insights into the way people grow and interact with others. If you’ll take this one seriously it will put you way ahead of the competition on a number of different levels.How we see the stages of growth showing up in the business worldClick To TweetOutline of this great episode Anthony’s introduction with Ken Wilber, philosopher, author, and teacher. What is consciousness? – and thinking about the structures of consciousness. Research showing how the “I’ aspect of consciousness grows and develops. 4 major stages of hierarchical growth. The common structures of development that business leaders should know. The stages of growing up: 8 levels of growth. Understanding how the stages of development show up in the business world.Our Sponsors:Swag IQwww.PreOrder.TheOnlySalesGuide.com – Get bonuses with Anthony’s new book.Resources & Links mentioned in this episodeMaslow’s Hierarchy of Needs0674445449The theme song “Into the Arena” is written and produced by Chris Sernel. You can find it on SoundcloudConnect with AnthonyWebsite: www.TheSalesBlog.comYoutube: www.Youtube.com/IannarinoFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/iannarinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/iannarinoGoogle Plus: https://plus.google.com/+SAnthonyIannarinoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarinoTweets you can use to share this episodeWhat IS consciousness? – get the answer on this episodeClick To TweetDo you understand where your team members are at in their developmental growth?Click To TweetSubscribe toIn the ArenaApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAndroidby EmailRSSOr subscribe with your favorite app by using the address belowlast_img read more