Denmark Builds 43Mile AntiPig Fence Along Border With Germany

first_img Is this what they call boar-der security? Denmark is building a 42-mile, anti-pig fence along its border with Germany in an effort to control the migration of wild boar and prevent the spread of African swine fever.There are fears that African swine fever, which has been found in two dead wild boar in Belgium, could threaten Denmark’s $4.55 billion pork industry, the BBC reported.The move was authorized by Danish lawmakers in June.African swine fever is harmless to humans but can be deadly for both wild and domestic pigs. (Photo Credit: Frank Sommariva/Getty Images)Unlike swine flu, African swine fever is harmless to humans, but can be deadly for both wild and domestic pigs. It is usually fatal within days, and there is no cure and no vaccine.If there was an outbreak of African swine fever, it can cause staggering losses for farmers. Denmark is the only European Union country where pigs outnumber people, with 215 pigs to every 100 residents.The Danish government is determined “to do everything we can to prevent African swine fever reaching Denmark. And now we can finally get started on erecting our wild boar fence,” said Minister for Environment and Food Jakob Ellemann-Jensen.The anti-pig border fence between Denmark (L) and Germany will cost $4.6 million to complete.(Photo Credit: Frank Cilius / AFP / Getty Images)Not everyone is on board with the boar-der fence, however.Critics said the fence, which will cost Denmark $4.6 million, can “harm wildlife and is a symbolic gesture tackling a largely non-existent problem,” according to the Associated Press.  Danish officials have also admitted that wild animals could, in theory, pass through the gaps in the fence.The fence, which is expected to be completed later this year, will be 5 feet tall and 1.6 feet deep to stop boar burrowing under, will have about 20 gaps at border crossing points and waterways, will have gates and steps so humans can climb over it, and will 8-inch openings every 300 feet for small animals to move through.More on Geek.com:Watch: Moose Chases Snowboarders at Ski ResortWatch: Spiders ‘Rain’ Down on Brazilian TownThese ‘Seagull Patrol’ Dogs Protect Diners’ Food in Sydney Watch: Dolphin Leaps Feet Away From Unsuspecting SurferWatch: Deep-Sea Octopus ‘Billows Like a Circus Tent’ Stay on targetlast_img

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