Mike Ross agrees new Ireland contract

first_imgTAGS: Leinster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Declan Kidney is delighted to have retained another international player, and said: “The IRFU’s policy of keeping as many players in Ireland as possible is an important part to helping Irish Rugby challenge for success in competitions at all levels. The news that Mike has made the decision to carry on his career in Leinster is good news for everybody concerned as he has continued to progress well and is a valued member of the international squad.”Leinster coach Joe Schmidt added: “Mike has been a consistent performer for Leinster this season and we are delighted that he has committed his future to the province. A popular member of our squad and a formidable scrummager, Mike has really come into his own at provincial level and more recently at national level and we are confident that his best years are still ahead of him.”center_img Leinster’s Mike Ross is the latest international to commit his future to playing in Ireland. The prop has penned a deal to keep him firmly rooted until the end of the 2012-13 season.31-year-old Ross, who returned to Ireland from Harlequins in 2009, has won 7 Ireland caps, and featured in every game of Ireland’s Six Nations campaign.He said: “It’s been an enjoyable couple of months for me and I am delighted to be able to have my new contract agreed and to remain playing for Leinster. Since coming back to Ireland, Leinster really has become my home and hopefully I can continue to maintain my performance levels to help keep the team successful and also keep me in the frame for selection for the Ireland team.”last_img read more

Famous faces out in force at Legends Rugby Festival

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Saracens Legends love-in: Saracens and London Irish players pose after their final showdown. Saracens won 35-8MORE THAN 3,000 rugby fans filed into Wimbledon RFC this month for the first Legion Legends Rugby Festival and they got to see a host of former players turn out for their old clubs, including Tim Stimpson, Henry Paul, Freddie Tuilagi, Peter Richards, Hugh Vyvyan and Rory Jenkins. Eight teams – Saracens, Harlequins, London Irish, London Welsh, Leicester Tigers, Worcester, Gloucester and Bristol – took part in the ten-a-side tournament, with Saracens beating London Irish 35-8 in the final.Familiar faces: Leon Lloyd in action for Leicester (left) and Harlequins and Saracens compete for the ball (right)Former Gloucester and England player Henry Paul said of the inaugural event: “What a great day! The heat was immense but it was so much fun to get stuck in and see some of the guys again. Once you step back on that pitch, all the competitive juices start to flow again and it’s like nothing’s changed.”Tim Stimpson, previously of Leicester, England and the Lions, added: “I’m sure I’ll feel this tomorrow, but for now, I can’t stop grinning. Great weather, great day, great rugby – what more could you want? I’ll definitely be back next year.”center_img Who’s who: how many familiar faces can you spot in the Leicester Legends team?CLIC Sargent Godfathers beat Olorun Godfathers in the amateur veterans’ final while Wooden Spoon triumphed in the seven-a-side women’s event, overcoming Wasps in the final. Next year organisers hope to expand the event to include legends teams from around the world.All inclusive: the event at Wimbledon RFC also had tournaments for minis and women’s sidesSing song: UB40 entertained crowds in the evening by taking to the stage to perform their hitslast_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_img Scampering to a final: Knock-on aside, Kahn Fotuali’i punished Harlequins in the Amlin semi-final The Irish side didn’t give up and boldly tried to score tries instead of kicking for goal as the clock ticked into the final quarter, but with Wilkinson there to punish their every mistake, Munster could not bridge the gap.Barnes stormerI am a big fan of the use of video technology to help officials make decisions during matches. If the referee and touch judges are unsure of something, I think it is always correct for them to “go upstairs” to the television match official for help.But I also like to see officials back their own judgement and believe their own eyes, which is why I was pleased to see referee Wayne Barnes allow Simon Zebo’s try for Munster against Toulon, even though at first sight there was a possibility he had been held up. Barnes had a quick conversation with assistant referee Luke Pearce and once he was happy Zebo had not gone into touch, he was confident enough of the grounding to award the try. And why should’t he have been? Barnes and Pearce were both right on the spot, with as good a view as any TV camera.Plenty of players and experts took to social media to say they should have consulted the TMO, but at least one replay of the incident seemed to show Zebo had eventually rolled over to ground the ball, so to my mind Barnes and Pearce were spot on.Back with a bang: Rob Webber scored two triesRemember me?Bath were forced to fight hard for their 24-18 Amlin Challenge Cup semi-final win at London Wasps and no one put in more effort than the West Country side’s hooker Rob Webber, who ironically played for Wasps from 2006-12.The Yorkshireman caused plenty of trouble for his former team-mates on his old stamping ground. He matched his shirt number with two tries in this victory, carried the ball eight times – which was bettered only by three other players from either team – and contributed to a 94% lineout success rate for Bath. It all added up to a Man of the Match award for Webber and a European final to look forward to.The SinnersCalamity ClermontThey had 68% of possession and 64% of territory, carried the ball 168 times (99 more than Saracens!) and won 130 rucks and mauls to their opponents’ 44, but Clermont Auvergne somehow ended up on the wrong end of a humiliating 46-6 scoreline in their Heineken Cup semi-final.Last year’s runners-up and semi-finalists the year before, Clermont failed to make a match of it this time. Yes, Saracens were utterly, utterly superb, but the French giants will be hugely disappointed with the way they failed to front up at Twickenham.Shocked: Clermont’s Julien BonnaireTheir defence was all at sea without the influence of the injured Aurelien Rougerie and they leaked six tries, missing 19% of their tackles. Saracens really didn’t need that much help.Clermont have never managed to do themselves justice on the European stage and they fell short spectacularly this time. Sky Sports commentator Miles Harrison summed it up beautifully, saying: “Once more Clermont Auvergne are destined to be the bridesmaid and they have not looked particularly good in the dress today either.”Mad momentHarlequins hooker Dave Ward did a magnificent job to strip the ball from Calum Clark after a tackle and gain a turnover for his team early in the second half of their Amlin Challenge Cup semi-final against Northampton. Quins were trailing 11-3 and Ben Botica had just missed a penalty, but with Ward’s terrific turnover, they were poised to attack.However, instead of laying the ball back safely, Ward had a rush of blood to the head and flung it high into the air. The hands which grabbed it were those of the Northampton scrum-half Kahn Fotuali’i, not one of Ward’s Harlequins team-mates. There was a suspicion of a knock-on as the Saints No 9 gathered the ball, but after he had hared in for a try the match officials could not see any clear reason to disallow it, so Northampton were 18-3 up and the gap was too large for Quins to bridge.Butter fingersTrying to avoid a fourth consecutive Heineken Cup semi-final loss, and trailing 21-16 to Toulon with three minutes to go, Munster couldn’t afford any mistakes as they went in search of a winning try. The SaintsStunning SarriesThere were so many outstanding performers in the Saracens ranks on Saturday, when they shocked the rugby world with an extraordinary 46-6 win over Clermont Auvergne, this entire list of Saints could be a Saracens-only zone this week.So, to give other clubs and players a look-in (which Saracens don’t seem particularly keen to do!), the star performers from the north of London are being lumped together here in one section.Big plaudits go to the whole team for setting a new record for a score in a Heineken Cup semi-final and for producing such an outstanding, all-round display that they made Clermont – giants of European rugby – look nothing but ordinary.The coaches need to take a bow, for getting the game plan spot on and Paul Gustard deserves extra praise for drilling his side so well in defence that they made 156 tackles and didn’t let the French fliers breach their lines.Chris Ashton grabbed his own headlines with two tries which took his tally in this season’s Heineken Cup to 11 – an individual record for one year.Burger king: Jacques Burger makes a hitAmong all the outstanding individual performers and the wonderful team ethic, there had to be a Man of the Match and that was Jacques Burger, the Saracens openside, who made an astonishing  27 tackles in the 69 minutes before he hauled his battered body to the replacements bench. Some of his tackles are right on the edge of legality, but he terrifies opponents with the power and frequency of his hits. Burger admitted afterwards that he had probably only touched the ball twice, but said his role was to “throw my body about and be really physical. It’s borderline stupid really.”His career was almost ended by a knee injury last year and he has to ice the joint about eight times a day to keep himself fit for action. Burger will continue to give it everything as Saracens go in search of a Heineken Cup and Aviva Premiership double and who would bet against them after this weekend’s demolition of Clermont?Yes he KahnThere may have been a tiny fragment of doubt about his second-half try for Northampton, as the match officials looked long and hard at the TV replays for a knock-on before allowing the score, but there was no doubt at all that Kahn Fotuali’i produced a top class performance for Northampton in their 18-10 win over Harlequins in Friday’s Amlin Challenge Cup semi-final.The Samoan was superb in attack and defence and was deservedly named Man of the Match on a day his performance out-shone that of England’s sparky No 9, Danny Care.Fotuali’i set up the Saints first try for Tom Collins with the most delicate and accurate of chips through the defence, off his “wrong” foot. His decision to kick caught Harlequins by surprise as Northampton had been battering away with pick-and-go moves close to the line and the referee was playing a penalty advantage, so they might have been expecting a drop-goal attempt.The scrum-half’s own try, scored in the first five minutes of the second half, required pace and strength as he grasped a loose pass from Harlequins, charged half the length of the pitch and saw off the attention of three defenders to muscle over the line and give his team an 18-3 lead.Fotuali’i gave much of the credit for his own brilliance to the Northampton pack, saying: “They gave me so much clean ball and we got on the front foot a few times.”On target: Jonny WilkinsonTarget menDefending Heineken Cup champions Toulon reached this year’s final with a 24-16 win over Munster, thanks in no small part to their two English place-kickers, who scored all their points.Jonny Wilkinson set himself up for a great swansong at the Millennium Stadium on 24 May as he landed six penalties and a drop-goal, and Delon Armitage sent a howitzer of a penalty between the uprights from his own half on the stroke of half-time to give the French side an 18-9 lead at the break.Wilkinson’s drop-goal illustrated not only his skill but his understanding of the psychology of the game as Munster had just narrowed the gap to 9-6 and he hit back with three points at the first opportunity – simultaneously steadying the Toulon ship and denting Munster’s confidence. The Heineken Cup and Amlin Challenge Cup took centre stage this weekend and there were star turns and spectacular flops aplenty. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Bath RugbyHarlequinsMunsterNorthampton SaintsSaracens As they attacked frantically, JJ Hanrahan sent a fast pass towards Keith Earls and he dropped it. From that turnover, Toulon won a penalty which Jonny Wilkinson kicked to take the game out of Munster’s reach.Yes, the pass from Hanrahan was pacey and came straight at Earls, who was facing him, but the 39-cap Ireland back would have expected to hold it. Big games can be won and lost by individual errors and while Earls was by no means the only Munster man at fault on Sunday, he was unfortunate enough to slip up at a critical time.last_img read more

Who should you support in the World Cup final?

first_img By Sam RobertsSo it’s been decided. We have a final between the two best sides in the competition. This Rugby World Cup has unfolded like a classic fairy tale. It occasionally twisted, as if to try to give us the slip, but ultimately we all knew where it was headed. The only two unbeaten sides in the competition progress to a showpiece match-up where one record must yield. We’ve never had these two royal rugby brethren in a World Cup final before, and yet they’ve both lifted the Webb Ellis Cup on two previous occasions. In beating the old foe on Saturday evening, third time will most definitely be a charm.But whom do you want to win? Unless of course you are from either side of the Tasman Sea, who to support come 4pm Saturday is a difficult question. There is very little between the sides, certainly not enough to use the word underdog safely and both have had enjoyed the amount of success that should not automatically warrant more. Both play an exciting brand of rugby and have players of similar skill-sets. From a neutral point of view, on which side to sit might call for something a little different.United in arms: Michael Cheika has the Wallabies playing for each other. Photo: Getty imagesAustralia represents a tricky backing; if you are English, supporting the Aussies is up there with French-kissing your sister. But let’s look at some of the reasons you might go Wallaby.Michael Cheika – As much as he looks like he’s been out most of the night, this man has got Australia firing on all cylinders in double quick time. Forget four-year cycles and looking to the future, Cheika’s got everyone singing from the same hymn sheet in under 12 months. He’s moulded a team who play for each other, defend like berserkers and bleed from the nose in unison. He’s the man who told Mario Ledesma (the Australian scrum coach who is a former Argentina international) to sing both anthems in the semi final: “Of course (he should), that’s (his) heritage, and I want him to love that.”Cheika effect: Michael Cheika looks on with coach Mario Ledesma. Photo: Getty ImagesCheika has integrated a lot of different personalities into the Aussie squad; he’s fostered a nerve and sinew able to withstand the sort of hammer blows that kept Wales out despite having two men in the bin, and yet had the perception and precision to strike so effectively against Argentina and England.He has a rugged charm that undercuts so much of the traditional Antipodean arrogance we seemingly dislike. He speaks Italian and French, and is the only man to win the major club cup competitions in both hemispheres (European Cup with Leinster and Super Rugby with NSW Waratahs). There is a lot to like about Cheika.David Pocock – Here is one big reason for you to be clutching a kangaroo come Saturday. Regarded by many as the finest player donning boots at this World Cup, Pocock does things very few others can on the pitch, but also off it. He is an activist against homophobia, outspoken on climate change and, as a man whose family was run out of Zimbabwe by violence when he was a child, now fronts a charity supporting farmers in the country of his birth. If that wasn’t enough, after winning the semi-final on Sunday, Pocock returned to his room to finish watching a natural history documentary. This boy is rugby’s own Shaolin Monk, just with massive biceps.Instrumental: Matt Giteau and Drew Mitchell. Photo: Getty imagesPlaying in France doesn’t matter – Matt Giteau and Drew Mitchell both play their rugby in France for Toulon. There was talk of neither being available for Australia because of their club rugby but Cheika was having none of it. He wanted the best players he could have going into the World Cup. And they have repaid the faith. Giteau’s reassuring hand in midfield has been instrumental and Mitchell’s beating of so many Argentine defenders on a late and decisive run last Sunday evening was enough to show that sense had prevailed. If your team has been affected by some of the themes in this paragraph, you may want to support Australia. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Head to head: Australia and New Zealand vie for a record third World Cup. Photo: Getty images Should neutrals support Australia or New Zealand in the World Cup final? We present the case for both teamscenter_img But what if you want New Zealand to win? How would you attempt to reason that one?Hansen’s humility – The All Blacks are wonderfully humble. They may play better rugby than everyone else but they never miss an opportunity to go round and thank the opposition. They join in prayer huddles, scoop up kids for selfies, stoop to lift fallen counterparts from the turf and generally want everyone to have a good time.A lot of this comes from head coach Steve Hansen. He has placed considerable importance on what many might refer to as ‘old school values’. He makes sure they always invite opponents into their changing room for a post match beer.Old school: New Zealand coach Steve Hansen. Photo: Getty imagesOnce the rugby has finished, the All Blacks do everything they can to achieve parity. What this has done for the likes of Namibia and Georgia is immeasurable. Hansen claims that every rugby player is like the other: “They are ordinary guys and you make lifelong friendships.” It is a wonderfully inclusive culture, one that is impossible to find fault in, and a very good reason to get behind the All Blacks this weekend.Gotta Love ‘Ruchie’ – There is no man who divides rugby public opinion more than Richie McCaw. He is enduring, extraordinary and apparently often offside. But few can dispute his effect on the modern game. In fact, players like David Pocock probably owe their mere presence in the final to McCaw’s ball-snaffling, turnover-tastic template. Rumoured to be retiring after this game, like others in this All Blacks side, you can’t really argue with a more fitting way to go out than lifting the cup.One last hurrah? Richie McCaw could bow out in style with victory on Saturday. Photo: Getty ImagesGet Carter – Despite being one of the most gifted players of his generation, this will be Dan Carter’s only chance at a World Cup final. The French got in his way in 2007, injury stripped him of the chance back home four years ago and now only Australia stand between him and the title. Having announced his international retirement post RWC, you wouldn’t begrudge Carter this chance. Not only does he play exceedingly good rugby, he is also absolutely lush. And this, as my wife will testify, is as good a reason as any to get behind him. Apparently. There you go; a few reasons to pick one of our wonderful contestants and, as our late Cilla would have uttered, it’s make your mind up time. But rest assured, whomever you chose, Green and Gold or All Black, this date is going to be unmissable.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Richie Gray: How to coach the breakdown

first_imgWHAT YOU COULD DOUnderstand defence and attack coaches and work with conditioners. You need players to have the right movement principles and remain dynamic for the breakdown. Everyone can be quicker – but you must coach the technique first.Collision coach: Richie Gray (second left) worked with South Africa at RWC 2015. Photo: Getty ImagesHave detailed plans for each of your players.You must do it every day. Some do a lot in pre-season then lose it later. Keep at it.Try this drill: set up a triangle of cones – white, red and blue – a few paces apart. Put a tackle bag in the middle, a ball beside it and a player holding a shield. After a down-and-up, a second player runs to a cone – call out a colour – and gets over the ball to rip it while the shield-holder puts pressure on them. This article first appeared in the January 2017 issue of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers, click here. Hands on: David Pocock competes for the ball at a ruck. Photo: Getty Images Richie Gray, Scotland’s defensive contact consultant, explains how to get your rucks right LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Australia flanker David Pocock is known as one of rugby’s best jacklers but Scotland coach Richie Gray, owner of Global Sports Innovation, says every player has a role to fill at the breakdown. Here the collision coach explains how to make sure you get things right at the contact area…1. MAKE IT IMPORTANT“The breakdown is not an add-on for your defence or attack coach. If you do it properly it can be that 1% that makes the difference – you do it 160 times a game. Treat it like another set-piece and set certain targets for each player.”In position: Glasgow players set up at a ruck. Photo: Inpho2. FORENSIC DETAIL“Break it down into key stages. You need to look at different aspects of both attack and defence: what you do when you fall, looking at your ball presentation, how you fight on the ground, hand placement, how you recoil, how you get up off the deck.”3. TRAIN SMART“Breakdown training can be a nightmare for your medics. I’m a big fan of using training aids – although nothing can replace live practice. So instead of doing 20 minutes live, try ten minutes with equipment and ten minutes live.”Go low: Billy Vunipola goes through his drills in England training. Photo: Getty Images4. KNOW THE ENEMY “You want to know how opponents attack and defend – how someone carries, steps or gets forward. Teams target weaker individuals and you never want to be the weak link. I tend to watch every player and see if I can spot any weaknesses.”5. IDENTIFY ROLES“Every player must be multifaceted, you must have all the skills. But be sensible. At 6ft 9in, Richie Gray won’t attack the breakdown the same way as John Hardie. Find the right technique for the right player. Not everyone can be the jackler.”Move in: Munster players adopt different roles at the contact area. Photo: Inpho6. COACH SIMPLICITY“The breakdown is so dynamic that if players have ten things in their head it’s a problem. Terminology is key. Train under fatigue but with two or three things in mind. Give detail on specifics – Francois Louw, say, is told things a front-row won’t need.”last_img read more

‘Water first, or table?’ Committee hears ‘open table’ testimony

first_img July 7, 2012 at 10:22 am Jeremy, the peace of the Lord be with you.I don’t think you read my comment at all. Please re-read it. What I believe about the Eucharist isn’t the issue, and I was abundantly clear about it. Never have I stated that “everyone should believe X about the Eucharist”. The nature of how it becomes the body and blood of Christ is not the issue. It is a spiritual discipline issue. By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 6, 2012 July 10, 2012 at 8:05 am There’s a good discussion going here, which I wouldn’t want to prevent, but the solution to this matter is staring us in the face: We are Anglicans, and we can decide not to decide, at least as a body. Why not leave the prerogative of offering open communion to those in the front lines, specifically those people who administer the sacraments, who see the full or empty pews, who know the needs of their community, who know when people feel the need to uphold tradition and when people are spiritually led to do things differently: Our PRIESTS. Simply establish that Episcopal tradition is to welcome all baptized Christians to the table, but that an ordained individual, while preferring to have individuals baptized, may see a benefit to welcoming others as well to communion. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY David Justin Lynch, Esquire says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (37) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Jeremy Bates says: July 8, 2012 at 10:50 am This should not be for emergencies only. It should be commonplace. Again – we are not a closed society! Joseph Farnes says: Elaine Jenkins says: J. Harold A. Boyd says: Featured Jobs & Calls July 7, 2012 at 10:31 am I think the Church needs to practice real hospitality and sharing the sacred mysteries while also just practicing love. No one is an “outsider” and should be loved and respected. I am also glad that your daughters would go forward for a blessing – isn’t that something that the world really needs right now, someone to proclaim a blessing on them?If we want to be welcoming, then we should be welcoming – but does that mean that the guest sets the rules in the house, or that we love them enough to talk with them, share with them our traditions and how important they are (and what preparation these sacred traditions and the Gospel require)?Maybe instead of changing the long-standing, ancient practices of the Church, we should sit down and really focus on how to love others in daily life. Do we love the stranger without strings attached, or do we want them to feel so welcome that they contribute to the church and reverse years of perceived “decline” in the Church? Welcoming people in church and ending the requirement of baptism will not necessarily make our Church a truly more welcoming and holy place. Only a people continually changed, nourished, and re-formed by God’s grace can make God’s love that apparent. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Joseph Farnes says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events July 8, 2012 at 10:48 am I grew up in the same era you did. So at age 8 I asked the Rector, Fr. Craven, what I had to do to receive communion. He said you had to be confirmed. I asked what did I have to do to get confirmed. He said learn the catechism. So I took a prayer book home and learned the catechism verbatim. I told him I did. He asked me the questions and I responded with the correct answers, verbatim. He presented me to the Bishop for confirmation the next time the Bishop was there. So at 9 years of age, I was confirmed and started receiving communion. HOWEVER – I was unusual. I’d like to see everyone at the table without having to jump through hoops. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 7, 2012 at 12:23 am I agree with Joseph Farnes that “welcoming” is an excuse for not dealing with deeper theological issues about who we are as followers of Christ. It seems that the answer to declining membership is to be “welcoming.” The inference is that people will visit once, find the congregation nice and continue coming back. This is shallow and unrealistic. I am not dismissing the need for people to be welcomed by the parish, but I am thinking that if all people are looking for is a welcoming community, they can find that at the Kiwanas, Eagles, Elks and many other community organizations.My belief is that the Church has more to offer. We have the healing love of God as manifested in Jesus. We have the potential of entering into deep relationship with one another based on our relationship with God. We have the potential for continual renewal and growth as individuals and communities. This is far more than being “welcoming.” How is it that we demonstrate the gifts that God gives us on a deep level? How can we touch the tender places of people’s hearts and help them open to God’s healing love? How can we nurture people to continue to grow in Christ?Admittedly this is more difficult than inviting everyone to the communion table. It requires intention and commitment. But it seems to have worked for the early Christian Church. This was a church without a lot of political power. It was struggling to survive and its members were being persecuted and killed. Strangely, their faith attracted others- for there was something to this new faith that must have been of value; people were going to their deaths singing and praising God. People value that which requires commitment and that which costs them something. Perhaps we should focus on forming those people who are already in our churches and prepare them to share the love of Christ with those who walk in the door. Perhaps this would help us be better disciples and perhaps we would have something richer and deeper to share with people who come through our doors. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Jeremy Bates says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA July 10, 2012 at 3:03 pm So much for reporting the news in an unbiased manner. This article headline might as well have read “Open Table: Good or Great?” Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Jeremy Bates says: Bruce E. Ford says: Kris Christensen says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 7, 2012 at 8:21 am I am not a cradle Episcopalian. Therefore, I was not baptized as an infant. I was baptized at age 21 when I made a mature profession of faith and repentance in the Baptist church. Prior to that time, if I had become and Episcopalian, I would not have been able to participate in Eucharist and would have felt like an outsider.Due to divorce and custody arrangements, my 2 daughters were reared mostly in the Baptist church. My younger daughter who was only 6 years of age when I became an Episcopalian felt comfortable approaching the rail to receive a blessing. My older daughter who was 12 at the time did not and never did. She chose the Episcopal church at age 18 and was baptized into our tradition of worship as an adult. My younger daughter is now 15 and remains without baptism although she clearly professes faith in Christ. As a young adult, we are allowing her to choose the time of her baptism. When she worships with me, she is comfortable receiving a blessing especially when her favorite Bishop (Bishop Ted Gulick) is the celebrant.I feel the pull of both sides of this discussion. I respect the importance of Baptism as a sacrament of initiation into the church. Yet, I remember worrying that my older daughter felt like she was being shunned when she attended church with me because she was not baptized. There are no easy answers to how the Episcopal church balances this.I think we must work hard at building relationships with every person in our pews so that the message that the “Episcopal Church Welcomes You” is truly felt in action. Too many times have I heard from people who have visited an Episcopal church that they felt we were a closed society where you had to know special things in order to be an insider. It is our job as ambassadors for Christ to see that “all divisions cease” especially when we are celebrating our Lord’s greatest act of Love. July 14, 2012 at 6:03 pm No, He didn’t. But He WAS Baptized. By inference, so were His Disciples. AND He did instruct them to Baptize all those who would follow Him. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 7, 2012 at 3:24 pm I was baptized as an infant in the Episcopal Church. I am in agreement with what Howie Gelles wrote. Do you reject the baptism of Jesus Christ by John the Baptist? Jesus said, “I am The Way, The Truth, and The Light. No one can come to The Father save by Me.” As an adult I left the Episcopal Church when this “welcoming” movement took away the Church I had been raised in. As this “welcoming” movement took hold I found that I had many more questions that the church could not answer or help me with finding the answers. Since then, I have been welcomed into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I have found many answers here, and have found a strong connection with, and faith in, Jesus Christ. My faith has become stronger and more clearly understood than it ever was in the Episcopal Church. I have complete faith in the love of Heavenly Father, Jesus Christ my Savior, and The Holy Spirit, not just for me, but for all mankind. Susan Lockhart says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 8, 2012 at 9:09 pm When we offer worship and include communion, as many of our street ministries do, e.g., Boston’s Common Cathedral, are we checking that the attendees are properly baptized? This endless harangue about which should be first – the table or the font – assumes both are contained within one of our sacred buildings. Aren’t we getting the message from the empty seats? Lynne Jacobson says: July 12, 2012 at 1:53 pm The Eucharist is the action of the Body of Christ, the Church. All are invited to be incorporated into the Body of Christ through Baptism. Those who have not been baptized are NOT members of Christ’s body.It is precisely because the Church is the Body of Christ that when the church offers itself to the Father in the Eucharist, Christ is offered. The unbaptized are not part of the Eucharistic sacrifice, and a canonical change cannot make them part of it. Only Baptism can.The church and the world are not co-terminous. “Inclusion” means “closing in.” Unless people who are IN the church can are distinguishable from those who are OUTSIDE the church, talk about inclusion is meaningless.Communion, in the full sense of the word, is ESTABLISHED through Baptism.I am sickened to see this grave issue discussed in terms of peoples’ FEELINGS. The inclusion wrought by Baptism is objective. It has nothing to do with whether people FEEL included.FEELINGS are irrelevant to this discussion. Howie Gelles says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing July 7, 2012 at 11:16 pm I wonder if Mr. Geiger minded presenting his documents of confirmation before running for the vestry. Or are we going to lower the bar so much that anyone can be a Eucharistic Minister and vestry member just so we don’t offend them? Rev. Wells and Professor Malloy are both right on target. We can be open and pastoral without requiring baptism. July 7, 2012 at 11:09 am I’m usually too busy trying to help the baptized live in community in a loving, hospitable way to be concerned about who else might come to the table. July 6, 2012 at 10:41 pm I find it interesting that the article is written to lean toward those who favor abolishing baptism as a precursor to admission to the communion table. Which side starts and ends the article?Question: when will we also abolish baptism and confirmation as requirements to holding church office? What, then, is the role of baptism, and does it confer any spiritual grace or actually incorporate someone indivisibly into the Body of Christ?At what point will we recognize that God can be worshiped and adored outside the context of the Holy Eucharist? I’m glad that we as a church have returned to the ancient practice of celebrating the Holy Eucharist each week and sharing the Body and Blood with even infants who have been baptized, but now have we neglected our rich heritage of Morning and Evening Prayer (which, oddly enough, have never required baptism) because “worship won’t happen without bread and wine and a priest”? Those who have not been baptized are also called to prayer and devotion to God – hence why Paul has that whole conversation in Acts about the altar to the “Unknown God”. Those who have not been baptized are still loved deeply by God and God graces and blesses those whom God so chooses. God is Love, and God sends blessings and love to all the corners of the world. Those who are not baptized can still pray, even if they do not really know who they’re talking to. How many people are there who aren’t really sure who God is but pray anyway? God hears their prayers. Baptism and the Eucharist, however, are special sacraments that God has entrusted to the Church for nourishing those whom God has called into the Church. If God calls someone into the Church, then they are incorporated into the Mystical Body by means of Baptism. The Holy Eucharist, then, is the sacred feast of the Church where Christ is mystically present – it is God’s gift to the Church to observe with love and reverence.Honestly, I fear that this entire debate about “welcoming” is a way to avoid having real conversations about real issues. When the debate is kindly framed “welcoming / open table” and “exclusivist / gatekeeping / baptism before Eucharist” we have already tried to paint people into a corner.Do I oppose communion without baptism? Yes, because I hold Baptism in the highest regard as the means by which we proclaim the reality of what we celebrate in the Holy Eucharist. Why would someone partake of the Body and Blood when they haven’t decided that they actually believe in the Good News which the sacred meal proclaims? And why would they believe in the Good News and not be baptized?The issue, for me, is not that people “don’t understand” the Body and Blood. I confess I really don’t, either, though I do trust that Christ is truly present in the Sacrament. The issue is that “being welcoming” is taking precedence over really wrestling with the mysteries, with what we live and proclaim (Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again – now what is it that we are baptized into, again?). People are not excluded from God’s grace because they are baptized or not (God is free to bless those whom God chooses), but this is not just “some” wafer and wine we’re eating. It’s participating in a real, holy mystery which is part of deep spiritual preparation and finds its deepest roots when the soil is well-nurtured.(And if those who favor ending the requirement want to say that I’m unwelcoming and excluding others, I’d like to remind them that they and I are already bound together by the vows we have made in baptism. If they want to doubt my love for others who have not been baptized, if they want to say I’m being “exclusionary”, then I’d like to ask them this: if you’ll treat someone who is bound to you in baptism with dislike, then how will you treat who are not bound to you in baptism? Can one member of the Body say to another, “I have no need of you”?) Rector Belleville, IL Greg Capaldini says: [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] There was standing room only at two separate hearings July 6 as the 77th General Convention’s Evangelism Committee heard both personal testimonials and theological rebuttals of the controversial “open table” Resolution C040.Bishops, deputies, visitors, youth observers and committee members themselves testified in morning and afternoon sessions about which should come first; baptism or communion.The resolution calls for a rubric change in the prayer book to invite all people “regardless of age, denomination, or baptism to the altar for Holy Communion” and would delete Canon 1.17.7, which holds that “no unbaptized person shall be eligible to receive Holy Communion in this church.”Emma Grandhauser, from Minnesota, a member of convention’s official youth presence, testified that she didn’t attend church until she was six, and she was baptized at 13.“I still remember my first Sunday in church at St. John the Evangelist in St. Paul,” she said. “It’s a church with their own open table policy.“I was blown away by how welcoming the community was,” she said. “They didn’t just tell me about God’s love, they showed me that God’s love is for everyone.“Communion is a really radical statement that we make,” she added. “We proclaim that Jesus died for us, that he loved us so much, so what better way to nurture new believers than by offering them a piece of God’s love which I know is for them? It’s not just for the baptized, it’s for everybody. I don’t think I would have been as comfortable with my baptism at 13, in my doubting, skeptical years, if the church hadn’t shown me the radical hospitality of open table. I don’t want the Episcopal Church to be a place of exclusion.”But the Rev. Jason Wells, a deputy alternate from the Diocese of New Hampshire, said that to the unbaptized he offers a blessing at the altar rail “and prepares them for baptism, to make their first communion immediately after that. I don’t do that because there’s a canon on the books. I do it for the theological and biblical rationale. To remove this one line from our canons does not change what my practice would be in the church.”He called the resolution’s language “confusing and somewhat self-defeating.”T.J. Geiger, from the diocese of Central New York and a member of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship’s young adult presence, said he belongs to the Episcopal Church because of an open table policy.When he first visited an Episcopal church in April 2010 there was no indication that baptism as a precursor to communion was the practice of the church, he said.Now he is a vestry member and in the process of being licensed as a lay preacher, none of which, he says, would have happened “had I seen explicitly the statement of exclusion. Had I seen the warning that only baptized persons may receive this sacrament or if I had heard it, like a border warning saying you must present your documents, I would have felt like an undocumented immigrant trying to enter the kingdom of God. We need all the people to be in reconciliation with each other.”But others, like the Rev. Carola von Wrangel, a deputy from the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, said that if passed, the resolution would create serious challenges for interfaith and ecumenical relationships.“I serve a church in Europe that has 35 different countries represented, has people of many denominations and we are part of an ecumenical body and interfaith dialogue with others. Our stepping ahead of our interfaith and ecumenical dialogues by going straight to open communion will greatly harm our relationships with others, both within and outside parish life,” she said. “We are called to move together as a church, as the greater church, not just as the Episcopal Church. Communion, baptism, ministry are bigger than just us.”Anne Watkins, a lay deputy from the Diocese of Connecticut and a Province 1 representative to Executive Council, said she favored the resolution. “I’m of the age, 59, that I remember the time when confirmation was the ticket to the table,” she told the committee. “Baptism wasn’t, and I remember at age seven or eight asking and never getting a satisfactory answer why when I’m with everybody else in church, am I not fit at the table. We corrected that, in my humble opinion.”The resolution should be reworded, she told the committee, because “it seems to be dividing us into a false dichotomy, that it has to be either/or. We’re making the assumption that if we invite people to an open table we’re throwing out baptism. You have an opportunity to amend the resolution to make it stronger so it isn’t either/or.”The Rev. Patrick Malloy, a liturgics professor at the General Theological Seminary in New York City, rejected it because “the resolution is extremely thin in its theology. There isn’t anything supporting this resolution except the notion that we should be hospitable,” he said.“Every other way we understand this very complex mystery of Christ’s presence among us is completely ignored.”Ariana Gonzalez-Bonillas, an official youth presence participant from the Diocese of Arizona, said she has seen the fruits of the open table. “It is more welcoming and evangelical, nurturing believers,” she said. “I’ve seen a whole Latino congregation accepted to take open communion before being baptized. They did get baptized … participating can lead to baptism. We gave them that nurturing and the open table gave that connection with God.”The Rt. Rev. Scott Hayashi, bishop of Utah and a committee member, said he was baptized at age 27 but had taken communion many times prior to that. He testified “in opposition to both resolutions and I also rise in favor of every single person who has spoken about the way to welcome all people to community, regardless of how they were baptized. How can I do this?” he asked. “It’s easy. I’m an Episcopalian.”He called a companion resolution, C-029, which would establish a special commission to study baptismal and Eucharistic theology, unnecessary. “In regard to setting up a special commission to study this. I do not think we need to spend any more time studying holy baptism or communion. So much work has been done on it, it is redundant.”He added, “We’ve been doing theology, we’re not of the same mind and the Spirit of God is moving in both directions. It’s a great Episcopal way to be, if you ask me.”The Rev. Leonel Blanco, also a committee member, said he favored the resolution, because of a personal pastoral experience.During a pastoral visit to a parishioner, a family member asked for communion. “She was suffering with cancer in the head,” he said through a translator. “I did not ask her whether she was baptized or not.”The community made her happy because she had been refused communion by her Roman Catholic priest, “because I am not legally married,” she told him. “I remembered Jesus Christ’s words; come unto me all of you who are tired and weary. I wonder if we were here with Jesus Christ today, would he say come unto me, all of you who are baptized or confirmed?”“Communion is also an act of evangelization; that is the reason why I give communion to everyone,” Blanco said.—The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. July 7, 2012 at 6:25 pm I’m an attorney. The legal profession does not have discernment groups or standing committees or commissions on ministry or anything similar. To be a lawyer in California, you have to get a legal education, pass the bar, and pass a very extensive background check. On the church level, I propose some thing similar. We ordain as a priest anyone who has completed an M.Div. degree (deacon after the first two years) passes the GOE, and passes a background check. Preference should be given to those who want to start new congregations rather than those seeking employment with existing churches. Rector Collierville, TN ‘Water first, or table?’ Committee hears ‘open table’ testimony Joseph Farnes says: Joseph Farnes says: July 7, 2012 at 5:27 pm Maybe those speaking before the committee who were opposed were all clergy but that does not mean all non-clergy members of our church agree with you. I for one am an Episcopalian from birth. My father was an Episcopal Priest. I was not allowed to have Holy Communion until I was confirmed. Today, all you need is to be baptized. I feel that this is the very least that a person should show they have chosen Christ before taking part in His Communion. Beverley F. Clement says: Joseph Farnes says: Rector Shreveport, LA July 7, 2012 at 3:26 pm The article suggests that many of those testifying in favor of open table are younger. We might do well to listen to the voices of those who are inheriting the church.Although I was already baptized when I first came to the Episcopal Church, if the first place I visited had a closed table, I would not have stayed. No theological argument could have made up for being told there were insiders and outsiders. That’s the notion that sent me away from the church (another denomination) for 20 years. It simply doesn’t match my experience of God.Our inner city parish welcomes an incredible diversity of folks–from middle-class cradle Episcopalians to homeless and mentally ill folks from a variety of backgrounds. To restrict access to the table would fly in the face of our corporate call to be a place of sanctuary and community for all who enter. I wouldn’t invite someone to my home, then make them watch my family & I eat dinner because they weren’t “related” to us. I’m certainly aware we could be wrong theologically, but we trust Jesus example of radical table fellowship–soldiers, religious elites, and tax collectors gathered together. If we err, it is on the side of acceptance and love. July 7, 2012 at 8:46 am On this question, I was recently asked, “What would Jesus do?”. My short answer: He was Baptized. Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL July 7, 2012 at 6:10 pm Then should we also offer ordination to anyone who demands it? Would we, by denying it to someone, be depriving them and setting a barrier before them? July 8, 2012 at 8:00 am As was pointed out above, Christ didn’t baptize anyone. July 7, 2012 at 3:51 pm I really appreciate your perspective Joseph. Thank you. It is the balance I was looking for on this topic with an emphasis on Love, ministry, and hospitality. I would add that receiving a blessing is a unique form of welcome that perhaps we should offer more openly. My 15 year old treasures it. It is a special comfort that I think she will welcome even after she begins to receive the sacrament. The priest where I am serving my field placement as a Postulant for the Vocational Diaconate offers both during Eucharist and many communicants ask for a blessing in addition to receiving the sacrament. Jeremy Bates says: David Justin Lynch says: Chaz Mercy says: General Convention, Emmetri Monica Beane says: Charlie Nichols says: Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 July 7, 2012 at 3:55 pm Joseph, I’m not sure. A couple things.I’m not certain we agree on how significant communion is. A sacrament is, after all, just an outward sign. Lots of Christians go through life without having communion more than once or twice a year, if that. But lots of people, like you, find it very significant. Some of them are baptized; some are not.As for communion’s roots in Judaism, I would say that a communion is, in part, a seder re-purposed by Jesus. It may not be that primarily, in the church’s mind today; but that historical link is surely why the “breaking of the bread” was such a familiar ritual to the earliest Christians, many of them Jewish.We all fall short of the Catechism ideal, so spiritual discipline doesn’t get us where the Catechism says we ought to be. As you say, grace makes up the difference. Why is that grace not available, at the communion table, to the baptized and unbaptized alike? David Justin Lynch says: July 7, 2012 at 5:13 pm The Body of Christ is all of us. It is not a closed country club. If you read our canons, the theme is barriers, barriers, barriers, to baptism, to communion, to ordination, to reception from other denominations, to transfers between parishes, to nearly everything there is a cumbersome process which can and does have the potential to be politically driven. This is not the way to spread the gospel. Baptism should be available immediately on demand and should not require a priest, not four times a year at Mass. Our table should be open to all comers without exception. We should establish objective criteria for ordination and orient it towards those who want to become priests to plant churches. Make reception of Roman and other catholic clergy quick and easy. Open table is the tip of the problem. There is lots more to be done if we are to truly carry out the Great Commission. Emmetri Monica Beane says: July 11, 2012 at 8:47 am Great discussion, my fellowship are Anglican (UK conservative Evangelical) but we never check a person’s baptismal credentials who wanders in. That may or may not come up in a chat after the service over a cup of tea (or coffee!). We do believe that communion is an opportunity for Christians to share a simple meal while reflecting on the sacrifice of Jesus. As such seems a nonsense if those coming forward have not accepted their need for rescue through the sacrifice we remember. Our Pastor does remind people of the words of Paul in 1 Corin 11 V 27-29 as we don’t want to encourage people to sin against the body and the blood of the Lord. I think it’s worth pointing out some baptised as children may even fall into the category referred to in Pauls letter while others who have accepted Jesus, but not been baptised, would not. That is of course assuming baptism to be symbolic rather than a spiritual qualification.By the way others may have pointed this out but in John 3 v22 John the Baptist’s disciples seem to have witnessed Jesus Baptising or at least overseeing his disciples baptising people, sort of suggests he felt this was important and the argument ‘Jesus never baptised’ a bit pointless. We would remind people who join our fellowship and have accepted Jesus as their Lord that they should be baptised (because Jesus commanded it) as a public declaration of their new life. We have 2 adults who are doing just that soon. However, more importantly is the fact that the Holy Spirit is with them now, they are living now as Christ’s own and as such it is a joy to see them with us at the communion table despite not yet being publicly dunked. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Joseph Farnes says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN David Jackson says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK July 7, 2012 at 7:48 am Joseph, you say that “the issue is not that people ‘don’t understand’ the Body and Blood”–but the rest of your comment makes clear that this is indeed the issue.You seem want to make sure that everyone at the communion table shares your view of what is happening there.You want people to “really wrestle with the mysteries” first. Only then, by your lights, is the recipient deeply spiritually prepared–or to use your rather suggestive metaphor, only then is the “soil well-nurtured.” Anne McCorkle Garrett says: July 9, 2012 at 8:37 am Polk, do you really think that no one feels called to be an attorney?How about being called to be a teacher? Doctor? Nurse?Or are you saying that God’s callings are only to the priesthood? Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 7, 2012 at 11:40 pm David, you might consider joining the Unitarians! Believe me, being a priest is not a “job” or “profession” like being an attorney. It is a CALLING. You cannot call yourself to the priesthood. Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Howie Gelles says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Polk Van Zandt says: David Justin Lynch says: David Justin Lynch, Esquire says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags July 7, 2012 at 11:10 am Howie, I’m as certain as I can be that Jesus never baptized anyone. Please check the Gospels. Polk Van Zandt says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 July 7, 2012 at 10:11 am A former United Methodist pastor, I used the official invitation “Christ our Lord invites to his table all who love thim, who earnestly repent of their sin and seek to live in peace with one another.” The UM stand was not that unbaptized followers were welcomed at the table (as many Episcopalians assume), but rather that the table would not be policed. The intent of this invitation was indeed to invite the baptized, but if others accepted this invitation, they would not be turned away. One time the Hindu father of a Confirmand, who was in attendance in support of his daughter’s choice, came forward and I served him. I don’t know what the moment meant to him, but it was a powerful experience for me to put the bread in his hand and say, “The body of Christ given for you.”It is possible to word the invitation in such a way that the policy is not changed, but no one feels excluded. If someone comes forward and does not cross arms over chest, but holds hands out, what are you going to do? I chose gracious hospitality, confident that the Spirit was at work. Jeremy Bates says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Wayne Rollins says: July 9, 2012 at 6:42 pm The fact of the matter is this. One does not need to be baptized, confirmed, ordained, etc. to become member of Gods’ family. These are all rituals. One has to simply accept in their heart, Gods’ son Jesus Christ & the free gift of salvation that was made available to all at Calvary. Of course God wants us to be part of a church family with other like-minded believers so we can grow spiritually, but don’t get it twisted. The church rituals are in no way a pre-requisite for salvation & eternal life. July 7, 2012 at 12:40 pm Peace, Joseph.Please do not assume that merely because I disagree with you, I have not read what you wrote. Indeed, I re-read your comment several times before posting my comment above, so that I might better understand what you said.You said that “The Holy Eucharist, then, is the sacred feast of the Church where Christ is mystically present – it is God’s gift to the Church to observe with love and reverence.”This is one understanding of communion. I would say it is a bit ahistorical–the Christian communion has fairly deep roots in Judaism–but it is one understanding.Some Christians, however, regard communion as a common meal, or as a memorial of Christ’s suffering and death. This freights the bread and wine with less significance–and surely this is an easier position for a beginning Christian to take.You asked, “Why would someone partake of the Body and Blood when they haven’t decided that they actually believe in the Good News which the sacred meal proclaims?”One answer: Because belief is not an all-or-nothing proposition. Suppose this someone has only a mustard seed of faith?You now say that this is a “spiritual discipline issue.” Could you please clarify? Are you saying that everyone needs to work a little bit before they can partake of the bounty of our Lord?But what if someone wants God’s grace, or understands that he or she needs God’s grace, yet cannot achieve much discipline to prepare for it–because he or she is too depressed, too upset, too bitter, too grieving?One traditional view is that such people, even if they are baptized Episcopalians, should not take communion, because they are not sufficiently at peace with themselves and the world.To me, however, it is especially for such people that communion is made. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 7, 2012 at 6:09 pm Kris, do let me weigh in on my age: I’m celebrating my 26th birthday this month, and I’m not part of the generation “inheriting” the church. I already am fully part of the Church by virtue of baptism, and I’m part of a younger generation that is concerned about living into the deep traditions of the wider Christian tradition. Jeremy Bates says: July 6, 2012 at 6:37 pm Seems to me that those who object to the open table feel a need to make sure that people “understand” what they are receiving.Most people understand what bread and wine are. Most people also understand the words of the eucharistic liturgy, and can judge for themselves what the bread and wine become.Perhaps that is what most troubles people–the idea that people might judge for themselves? July 7, 2012 at 2:47 pm Jeremy-So what we do agree upon is that the Eucharist is incredibly significant (otherwise we wouldn’t disagree so strongly).As far as what the Eucharist is, I don’t think we should so readily identify it with a Jewish seder — Jesus does say this is his body and blood, and our Prayer Book says in Eucharistic Prayer B on page 369:“We pray you, gracious God, to send your Holy Spirit upon these gifts that they may be the Sacrament of the Body of Christ and his Blood of the new Covenant. Unite us to your Son in his sacrifice, that we may be acceptable through him, being sanctified by the Holy Spirit. In the fullness of time, put all things in subjection under your Christ, and bring us to that heavenly country where, with [______________ and] all your saints, we may enter the everlasting heritage of your sons and daughters; through Jesus Christ our Lord, the firstborn of all creation, the head of the Church, and the author of our salvation.”This language is not the language of a seder. In this prayer, we are asking God to unite us to his Son in the sacrifice of the Cross. We are united with Christ in baptism. Maybe we should be practicing the Moravian Lovefeast (which is kept distinct from communion)?I am a young convert to the Episcopal Church – and I came to the Episcopal Church from church traditions that did not have strong theologies of what the bread and wine (or water, when I was Mormon) were. Did I partake not knowing what it was, other than that the Church taught it was Christ’s Body and Blood, something incredibly holy? Yes. Do I still partake? Probably unworthily, but yes. And I really can’t say that the bread and wine are anything other than the Body and Blood – something holy, something incredibly holy, but I know it’s holy. I guess we need to ask: are the consecrated elements anything holy in themselves or only in context of worship? I am grateful that the priest who taught me before I was confirmed into the Episcopal Church sat me down and helped me explore Eucharistic theology so I could start making sense of what was happening in the mass (not that I’m done trying to make sense of it) so I could see the holiness of the elements.If someone has just a mustard seed of faith, why not nourish it and give it voice? Why not dialogue with people and listen to them to help them grow in what they believe? It might be worse to just leave the person to figure out faith by themselves because they won’t have the benefit of the vast resources of tradition, Scripture, and solid teaching. Let them first just listen to the Word, learn to say the prayers, and grow spiritually so they can ask themselves, “What is it that I believe, and why is this bread and wine so important? What does Christ’s life mean to me? What does the Church mean to me?” Wouldn’t that help them make sense of why they feel drawn to eat and drink the Body and Blood, and wouldn’t that reflection nourish their spiritual journey a lot?As far as the Spiritual Discipline issue, I think we all (myself included) should take St Paul’s advice a little more seriously: “For all who eat and drink unworthily eat and drink judgment against themselves” (1 Cor 11:29). The Prayer Book catechism is a little stricter:Q. What is required of us when we come to the Eucharist? A. It is required that we should examine our lives, repent of our sins, and be in love and charity with all people (pg 860).I’m certainly not in love and charity with all people, let alone actually doing the rest of the stuff I should. Do I eat in condemnation of myself? Yes, because I am taking for granted the promises and grace of the Gospel. I am assuming God will be gracious to me, and that puts me in a position of being egotistical. Grace is a gift, not a right. God does not owe it to me (or anyone) but freely gives it to those whom God chooses.For those who are hurting, shouldn’t it be OUR bodies and hearts and minds that they receive first? If they don’t know our love first, if we aren’t the ones listening as they walk and figure out their faith alongside us, then will the love of God seem as apparent? God’s grace also acts outside of the elements (i.e. God’s grace can work through us outside the Eucharist).Does this help make my ideas any clearer? July 6, 2012 at 9:42 pm What is interesting is that nearly all the opposition is from clergy. No one is ordained to be a gatekeeper. Paul Lewis says: General Convention 2012 Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 7, 2012 at 10:44 pm David, the Book of Common Prayer only states that it is “especially appropriate” on the 4 days you make reference to. The sacrament of baptism can be performed at any time. The Book of Common Prayer also specifies under the heading “Emergency Baptism” the following:“In case of emergency, any baptized person may administer Baptism.” and a form to follow is given: Using the given name of the one baptized (if known), pour water on him or her, saying, “I baptize you in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. “The Lord’s Prayer is then said. Notice that the name of the person being baptized does not even need to be known. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Blessing rite authorized for provisional use from First Advent

first_img Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 11, 2012 at 12:06 am Alleluia! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 11, 2012 at 12:06 am I am so grateful for this marvelous church. God is truly at work among his people. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Marilyn Lorenzen says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC Liturgy & Music, CJ Ford says: Press Release Service July 10, 2012 at 11:20 pm Thanks Be To God! Amen. CJ Ford says: July 10, 2012 at 11:43 pm Well, 43 1/2 yrs ago I was at Stonewall in Greenwich Village before the raid. So, I’m older than “gay liberation,” as it was once called. Even though single, i am nurtured and renewed by this decision, because it supports my relationship to the church as I continue my life journey. July 11, 2012 at 2:36 am Frank Bergen,I am unsure that you can say this is an example of a sensus fidelium. The conservative voice in TEC has been reduced over the years. In s similar manner, other churches have grown more conservative, losing their progressive members. How can you say there is a sensus fidelium if a church has narrowed? Frank Bergen says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing July 11, 2012 at 8:35 am Alleluia and amen. I just wish my partner of 37 years had lived long enough to see this happen. I’ve been an Episcopalian for almost 50 years, and I never thought I would see this. Lawrence Elliott says: Michael N Isham says: July 11, 2012 at 12:38 am This is one of the many reasons I love the Episcopal Church. How could we have come to such a place without the love and guidance of God and the Holy Spirit? This act of love ought not lead to a house divided.LawrenceSt. Paul’s Memorial Episcopal ChurchCharlottesville, Virginia Blessing rite authorized for provisional use from First Advent Liturgy still ‘work in progress,’ convention calls for continued comment Timothy J. Mannion says: Edgar Wallace says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Vic Mansfield says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 12, 2012 at 2:31 am When are you guys going to get it? It’s not about sex….it’s about love…get your mind out of the gutter. July 11, 2012 at 10:38 am Whilst matriculated at Bob Jones University in the late 1960s, I heard sincere Christians preach with equal conviction to Ms. Lyons Gunn’s opinion that mixed marriages and racial integration were also, to quote Ms. Lyons Gunn, “an abomination in the eye’s of God”. And they had the scriptures at hand to prove it! And I believe that the university has since repented of those claims! As fallible human beings supposedly in awe of our Creator, shouldn’t we be mighty careful of “seeing” through the eyes of the Almighty? July 11, 2012 at 2:15 pm To correct the historical record, Rome did not fall when it was a pagan empire tolerant of certain homosexual conduct. It fell after Christianity became the preferred religion. Its fall had more to do with getting over-extended and poor government. And, of course, the Eastern part of the empire survived to the fifteenth century.As for the Bible, the application of its teaching in the specific should not do violence to over-arching principles, and these principles should be applied with the fullness of knowledge and experience the Church has available to it in the twenty first century. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET General Convention 2012, Rector Collierville, TN Michael N Isham says: Jesse Murray says: Comments (64) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Joann Prinzivalli says: July 11, 2012 at 11:25 am The theology of marriage as it relates to same-sex couples can be based on the marriage found in 1 Sam 18:3 between David and King Saul’s son Jonathan, in which the two made a covenant and knot themselves together as “one soul.” (Later in the chapter, when David also marries King Saul’s daughter Michal, David becomes Saul’s son in law a second time (and go to the Septuagint and not the Vulgate for that, please, or perhaps to Darby or ASV, as opposed to Douay or KJV). There are other references in 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel 1, particularly the meeting in the field.John Boswell uncovered early Church (pre-14th Century) blessings of same-sex unions, the formula for which was derived from the 1 Sam 18:3 marriage, in his work, Same Sex Unions in Pre-Modern Europe.From a secular POV, marriage should be marriage, and on a gender-neutral basis, fully equal for both same-sex and opposite-sex couples. But if one is approaching the idea of marriage equality from a scripture-and-tradition viewpoint, one can find and recognize a separate sacramental blessing for same-sex unions based on the couple becoming “one soul” in much the same way that opposite-sex unions are blessing the couple becoming “one flesh.” The scriptural and tradition references are there — all one has to do is stop ignoring and suppressing them. Gregg Conroy says: July 11, 2012 at 2:55 pm “What would be an appropriate response to that Scripture passage?”I thought that the theological essay preceding the blessing rite (available in the blue book, linked in the article above) did a masterful job of concisely summing up arguments for interpreting Romans and a couple of other particularly challenging Biblical passages in a more positive and less literal light; there’s also footnotes to several theological works that explore the issues in detail. It still probably won’t work in argument (it hasn’t with any of my more conservative family members, and the reaction of David Shepherd to your question mocks, albeit in a fashion that shows a great deal of misunderstanding of the arguments involved, some of these interpretations), but I’ve always found confidence in knowing that there’s a lot of very well considered theology on our side. Br. Mark D’Alessio, SSF says: John Sandeman says: Submit a Press Release Ian McCutcheon says: July 11, 2012 at 6:52 am Thanks be to God! Alleluia! Amen! Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC July 11, 2012 at 7:36 am I notice that the title of the liturgy does not mention same-gender couples. Can this liturgy be used for a marriage ceremony of opposite-gender couples? Can it be used to bless “lifelong covenants” of opposite-gender couples? I’m not trolling here — I’m asking an honest question as a naive layperson. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET July 11, 2012 at 12:10 pm i truly understand the difficulty many have with this move and with the acceptance of LGBT folk. I fought it for 40 years. It became slow-motion suicide of the soul.I would guess that many would not understand when I say that coming out has been (and continues to be) the deepest, most profound Spiritual experience of my life. I never expected that. What I feared may have been the end to my life in the Church has become a new beginning.I would suggest that the Bible IS very clear about sexual exploitation, and abuse. It would seem that many heterosexual folk assume that the lives of homosexual folk revolve around sexual activity. Is that the center and anchor the end-all and be-all for heterosexuality?This is not a “lifestyle.” Martha Stewart does “lifestyles.” This is our lives, and our life.It is not just about lust, but about love.The more faithful, committed LGBT Christians you get to know, the more you will see that God shines through. Please take a look. July 13, 2012 at 8:29 pm Traditional marriage in the bible also has polygamy, concubines, forced marriage between rapists and their victims, prisoner of war wives (similar to Achilles’ Briseis in the Iliad), and forced stoning of brides found to not be virgins. Not to mention that it was perfectly acceptable to beat your wife or sell you daughter into slavery. But I guess you’d prefer to skip those and instead condemn two people in long-term, loving, monogamous relationships that just so happen to be of the same sex.On another note I’m very proud of the Episcopal Church for standing up for what is right while the rest of the christian community is so full of hate. Things like this are the only reasons I am still affiliated with any church. Richard Rhoads says: July 12, 2012 at 4:59 pm This comment is meant as merely food for thought.You stated that David Thurlow said this is a departure from traditional doctrine and theology and was in fact a “new theology”. If Jesus established the church, and from Deuteronomy to Revelation, scripture warns against adding or subtracting from its teachings, is the introduction of “new theology” also an introduction of a new church and a break from Christ’s one holy and catholic church. Couldn’t this be seen as church-wide apostacy? Sandy Poole says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 11, 2012 at 11:12 am In having conversations with other Christians (especially those who disagree with ‘practicing homosexuality’, as they label it), they often quote Romans 1:18-27.What would be an appropriate response to that Scripture passage? I would like to be better informed the next time the topic comes up.Thanks Human Sexuality, Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI July 11, 2012 at 11:23 am While I rejoice upon hearing this news, I am also saddened by the knowledge that this will not happen in my diocese. Sort of a moot point for some of us. Michael N Isham says: July 11, 2012 at 8:26 am Au contraire, it will hopefully lead to more open-minded, loving and respectful congregations in our church. McClure Brower says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ July 11, 2012 at 11:18 am Oh, that’s an easy one to answer for Mr. RB Clay: although you may not agree with the stands taken by the Episcopal Church in applying our beliefs, we nonetheless believe first and foremost in Jesus Christ as the Son of God and the head of the church catholic. The Unitarian Universalists (note the capitalization of respect) do not believe this! But alas, Mr. Clay, I thought that the word “gospel” meant GOOD NEWS? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Eric Rodriguez says: July 11, 2012 at 12:13 am I love God and how the Lord continues to surprise me…. Thank you Jesus:) Joann Prinzivalli says: Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ken Richards says: RB Clay says: July 12, 2012 at 5:59 pm In Romans 1, Paul was referencing the practices of the religious competition in the Rome of the 1st century A.D. – At the time, there were mystery religions, and religions that involved “Bacchic” rituals – drinking wine to excess and participation in sacramental orgiastic behavior.To Paul, with his background as a Pharisee, this was certainly scandalous, and the fact that men and women in their “religious” drunken revelry/worship were acting against the natures they were given by God, was something Paul saw as evidence that God was punishing them.The key to the scriptural exegesis here is that these people were acting against their natures – It would be as sinful for a gay person to engage in opposite-sex sex, as it would be for a straight person to engage in same-sex sex (of course, then there are those bisexual folks, whom we would expect from a Christian moral POV to keep themselves within a monogamy, of one or the other type).It’s not that difficult to understand – Nature is not monolithic, we are not each identical paper dolls in our God-given natures – and to place such a man-made limitation on God was surely not Paul’s intention. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img July 11, 2012 at 10:20 am I am currently taking the classes to be confirmed and my husband will be baptized in the Episcopal Church in October. My husband and I have been on a long search to find our church home. We feel the glow of the Spirit in this church. Jesus Christ was all about unconditional love, loving your neighbor as yourself, and embracing with open arms the “outsiders” of our society. I feel the love of Christ within the Episcopal Church and feel that the convention’s decision was one of compassion, love, and inclusion. Alleluia! Joann Prinzivalli says: July 11, 2012 at 11:42 am RB Clay:There is a huge difference between U/U and ECUSA, and between both and the United Way.ECUSA represents a form of mainline Protestantism, even if the division between the Anglican Communion and the RCC occurred over a particular marriage, and the dominion of the papacy, rather than the more radical “reforms” of Luther, Calvin, et al.U/U did involve a merger between two somewhat different sects that grew out of the spiritual revival of the 19th Century among Congregationalists, who had already had a rather stripped-down kind of Christianity. One kind of Unitarian thinking can be illustrated by Thomas Jefferson, who famously clipped out the miracles and Resurrection from his set of Gospels, and came up with a kind of “Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth” book that kept the Good News and lost all the added barnacles. (Of course, these days, U/U doesn’t have a theology, but rather involves a covenant among people with many disparate faith backgrounds and formulae).While I can conceive of folks from ECUSA finding common cause with U/Us (and the United Way, for that matter) on all sorts of social justice issues, a suggested merger wouldn’t really work. I’d find it more interesting to find U/U exploring a convergence with Universal Sufism . . .Perhaps as we become more civilized, we will be able to evolve the various mythos in which we find our spiritual homes to keep up with the progress of civilization. One can see the evolution of God in the OT from the pre-monotheistic Elohim, through the angry tribal god of the Hebrew tribes to the majestic and inspirational God found in Isaiah. Our conception of the Unknowable is reflective of our own selves – it’s more likely that we create our Image of God in our own image, and the reflection we see tells more about our inner selves than we might are to admit. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Same-Sex Blessings Rector Albany, NY July 11, 2012 at 1:44 am So sad…..how can a church condone of a lifestyle that is an abomination in the eyes of God? The lifestyle is negatively talked about in the Bible more than once. By condoning such lifestyle is furthering it. Why is the church not taking a stand against it? Feel this will lead to membership loss in a once great church.A cradle Episcopalian who loves her church! July 11, 2012 at 9:16 am How can so many clergy who all took vows hat they believe the Bible to be the Word of God, vote for same gender blessings? There is so much in the Bible that defines traditional marriage and speaks against the gay life style!And – Was the Catechism changed? And the reference to traditional marriage in the Articles of Religion can’t be changed. Todd Parker says: July 11, 2012 at 5:18 pm John, I’m not sure. I think perhaps we need to consider a community gathered together in a common effort to live as followers of Jesus. From time to time fairly fundamental issues arise that are disputed among them. In some instances the community agrees that their divergent viewpoints are not reason for them to part company, to dissolve the relationship. They agree to disagree within a shared life together. In others, the issue comes to seem too important to be left unresolved. That determination of need for a resolution can make it infeasible, even perhaps impossible, for the community to continue undivided. Perhaps the sensus fidelium is at play on both sides. Or perhaps, and we do shy away from saying it, one side is more in tune with the Holy Spirit than the other. Only for myself, for I can speak for no other, I read the Spirit in the lives of my sisters and brothers more clearly than in the Book. And I’m convinced that the direction our little part of the body of Christ is moving is Spirit-led, and the sensus fidelium within our faith community is that we’re all God’s children, meant to accept one another just as God made each of us in unconditional love. And if I’ve misused the term sensus fidelium, I still stick by that last sentence. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls By Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 10, 2012 July 11, 2012 at 10:40 am I wish TEC would be honest and conduct some sort of joint merger with the unitarian universalist faith and the United Way. What need exists for the Christian gospel when there is no bad news, when no sin exists, and everyone stands right before a holy God? An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET July 12, 2012 at 11:48 pm Thank you for the question! There are many who would take advantage of this option. I am not trolling either. July 11, 2012 at 1:09 am Well done, good and faithful servants. July 14, 2012 at 12:17 pm Then perhaps Ms. Gunn should abide by Paulo’s admonition of women keeping silence in the church…. Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group July 11, 2012 at 8:57 am When a church comes together and decides on love and generosity rather than a clinging to the past and the pursuit of a perceived “safe path”, how could one be but proud? When our priests and bishops, in their wisdom, take the road less travelled in order to make real the inclusiveness of the church, when others would rather exclude, a sense of hope swells up within me. And when our fellow congregants have difficulty embracing this new path, I understand their difficulty in facing change. For thousands of years, our homosexual brothers and sisters have faced hatred and the condemnation of the church and society. Their lives have been torn apart. Today, we courageously turn our back on that. Thank God for the Episcopal Church. July 11, 2012 at 8:25 am Jesus would say: “Love one another as I have loved you.” He would not throw stones about as you apparently think he might. I’d like to know what Bible you have a copy of that puts such words in Jesus’ mouth. He is, was, and always will be “all about the love,” in all it’s many forms. July 11, 2012 at 1:18 am So sad to see my church headed this way, but it is a sign of the time in a changing world. From what I see from the Bible, this lifestyle is an abomination unto God. Perhaps we should look at Rome and their lifestyles. Eventually Rome fell. Surely we should be aware where we are in life…..what would Jesus say? This may cause a falling away from our great historic church. July 11, 2012 at 10:28 am It is ironic that Ms. Lyons Gunn used the example of the downfall of the ancient Roman state when chastising the actions of our church. Me thinks Ms. Lyon Gunn is confusing Rev. Pat Robertson’s diatribes on the anticipated downfall of the United States with the pan-national struggles of the Christian Church. For the record, we are not members of a nation-state on this matter but, for better or worse, fellow members of the Body of Christ. And while some erstwhile members of that body have for many centuries been willing to burn dissenters at the stake in the name of Christ, one can hope that all of our current debates are expressed through loving hearts! Tad Richard says: Jeannie Lyons Gunn says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Jerry Thompson says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 11, 2012 at 12:49 pm ‘What would be an appropriate response to that Scripture passage? I would like to be better informed the next time the topic comes up.’Er…Episcopalians don’t let the Scripture stand in the way of what they are determined to do.Oh, the other one is ‘Paul wasn’t talking about faithful monogamous same-sex because that would put us in enmity with God.Er…Homosexuality, as it is understood today never existed in biblical times. Although, in the same breath, we can trawl out David and Johnathan to prove it did exist (without clear evidence).Look, just say that any attempt to challenge homosexuality on biblical grounds is homophobic. You might even get an injunction. Anything to silence the condemnation of the apostolic record. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Lauren Smith, Holy Comforter Episcopal Church, Tallahassee FL says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Karen T. Morgan says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention, July 11, 2012 at 11:02 am With all due respect, you “gay life style” and “gay agenda” types crack me up. Fr. Waverly-Shank, would that I could allow you in as a casual observer of my daily life as a committed partner in a gay relationship: our “gay lifestyle” would bore the hell out of you! For the record, I do believe that the field is ripe for the evangelism of countess thousands of heart-broken gays and lesbians who have taken on unhealthy habits that include alcoholism, drug abuse, serial sexual partners, and suicide, not because they have been accepted by the church, BUT BECAUSE THEY WERE REJECTED! Might I also add that the “gay lifestyle” seems to apply to millions of straight people in our nation also? Dear Fr. Waverly-Shank, if you would care to leave the security of your office, I would be most honored to accompany you to the streets and bars of Philadelphia on a mission trip to win the souls of those lost without the Good News. I believe that this approach was sanctioned by our Lord Jesus, was it not? Any interest? I await your reply! Comments navigation Newer comments James Vickers says: Frank Bergen says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Joann Prinzivalli says: July 11, 2012 at 9:14 am So, now that a “a service of blessing for same-sex couples who are in lifelong, faithful monogamous, committed relationships” has been approved, where is the service for opposite-sex couples who are in lifelong, faithful monogamous, committed relationship but who are not married and don’t want to be, for whatever reason? How about that senior couple who live together but do not marry because of the financial impact on SS payments, pension plan survivor benefits, etc., etc., etc.? What about my heterosexual couple friends who have been together for over sixteen years, have a child but aren’t married? What if they want their union blessed but still don’t want to marry? Now we’re “discriminating” against them.What would Jesus say? Maybe “Hate the sin but love the sinner.” Loving all people DOES NOT mean loving what they DO. When rearing our children and they DID something we disapproved of we always tried to make the point that we loved THEM but were punishing them for their BEHAVIOR. July 11, 2012 at 6:55 am This action by Convention renews my faith in our Church. I had been holding my breath. All the positive comments above are spot on. Theological understandings have evolved across the centuries in other areas, and so it must be in sexuality and love. I was widowed after 28 years of happy and faithful love. We wanted to marry. In our hearts, we were. But we wanted to share it with friends, family, church,and say our vows to each other. Thank God that will now be possible for others. Maybe even for me. Comments navigation Newer comments Matthew Phillips says: Tags Michael N Isham says: July 16, 2012 at 12:57 am A) Boswell’s scholarship is questioned by both historians and theologians.B). Even IF Boswell’s premises and deductions are true and accurate, it alters nothing in terms of Truth. You don’t have to dig very deep at all in Christian history to find such things as Arianism, Donatism, Jansenism, etc., but theses things have been rejected by the Church Catholic as being error. Even if Boswell “recovered” evidence of such rites, well, the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church has always and will always declare their inherent falseness. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Timothy J. Mannion says: Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Jeannie Lyons Gunn says: David Shepherd says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 11, 2012 at 1:15 am South Carolina’s Very Reverend David Thurlow stated: “This resolution marks a clear and significant departure — theological, doctrinal and in worship — from the doctrine, discipline and worship of Christ as this church has received them,” he said. It introduces a “new theology of human sexuality.” And isn’t it about time for a new theology of human sexuality? Hasn’t the one, holy, catholic and apostolic church of Christ outgrown the uninspired and uninspiring theology of human sexuality that so many of us grew up with and have been affected, perhaps even infected by, unless and until the shackles have been smashed by the grace of God? We Anglicans, and perhaps Episcopalians foremost among members of the Communion, do our theology in ways that are sometimes messy, we may reverse the logical order in tackling issues, but we seem often to get to the heart of the matter. We have taken on the blessing of same sex unions without first rewriting our theology of human sexuality, but we’ve accepted a new understanding of sexuality in saying that God’s grace and the church’s blessing are available to couples in lifelong, faithful monogamous, committed relationships. And all the people say Amen! Good Anglican, good Catholic but not always good Roman John Henry Newman would point to today’s ratification of growing consensus in church and society as an excellent example of the sensus fidelium alive and well in Christ’s church. Rector Belleville, IL July 11, 2012 at 11:53 am In having conversations with other Christians (especially those who disagree with ‘practicing homosexuality’, as they label it), they often quote Romans 1:18-27.What would be an appropriate response to that Scripture passage? I would like to be better informed the next time the topic comes up.Thanks Bob Darling says: Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: July 24, 2012 at 1:17 pm John Kirk,Thank you for pointing out that there may be some who have raised issues with Boswell’s scholarship, and that there have been numerous variants in theological understandings.When it comes to the “One Holy Catholic and Apostolic” Church and its interpretation of Truth, I have read and been critical of a speech made by then Archbishop (now Cardinal) Dolan as he was about to take over the Catholic New York Archdiocese, in which he referred to “The Unchanging Church.” Truth within that milieu, over the past two millennia, has been malleable. Examples include the RCC’s teachings on abortion and slavery. Those who claim the Whole Truth find themselves bereft if there is even a single Error – it’s a dangerous position to take. However, I am mindful of the RCC tenet regarding the “binding and loosing” power as passing from Peter to his successors. It is not entirely inconceivable that in a few hundred years, even the RCC might change. I am actually surprised that the RCC has continued to expand the availability of annulments rather than re-interpreting the doctrine on divorce – from a contextual POV, it is entirely possible that Jesus’ disapproval was aimed at the practice by which a husband could unilaterally declare a divorce (“let no man set aside” could well be interpreted as a reference to the husband, and not all men – I doubt that Jesus intended to put the power of divorce in the hands of women, whether the wives in question or a judicial panel composed of women, though *that* would be an interesting outcome). My point is that Truth may well be misunderstood, or that the understanding of Truth may evolve – this is not “moral relativism” by any means – it’s not arbitrary. John Kirk says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Deputies line up to testify about authorizing a rite of same-gender blessing for provisional use July 10 while the Very Rev. David Thurlow, deputy from South Carolina, gives a minority report from convention’s Committee on Prayer Book, Liturgy and Church Music. The committee’s majority recommended adoption of the rite’s enabling resolution. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] Same-gender couples soon can have their lifelong relationships blessed using a rite approved by General Convention July 10.In a vote by orders, the House of Deputies concurred with the House of Bishops to pass Resolution A049, which authorizes provisional use of the rite “The Witnessing and Blessing of a Lifelong Covenant” starting Dec. 2 (the first Sunday of Advent). Clergy will need the permission of their bishop under the terms of the resolution.The motion in the House of Deputies carried by 78 percent in the clergy order, with the clergy in 85 deputations voting yes, 22 no and four divided; and 76 percent in the lay order, with laity in 86 deputations voting yes, 19 no and five divided. The bishops had approved the resolution on July 9 with a roll call vote of 111 to 41 with three abstentions.The resolution also calls on the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music “to conduct a review process over the next triennium, making clear that this is a work in progress,” the Rev. Ruth Meyers, deputy of the Diocese of Chicago, said in introducing the legislation to the deputies. She chaired the convention Prayer Book, Liturgy and Church Music Committee’s subcommittee on blessings and the SCLM.The resolution directs the SCLM to include “diverse theological perspectives in the further development of the theological resource” and to invite responses from throughout the church as well as from the Anglican Communion and the church’s ecumenical partners.The resolution states that, under existing canons, clergy can decline to preside at a blessing liturgy and says that no one “should be coerced or penalized in any manner, nor suffer any canonical disabilities” for objecting to or supporting the 77th General Convention’s action on blessings.The Rev. Ruth Meyers, Chicago deputy, and Diocese of Vermont Bishop Thomas Ely congratulate each other July 10 after the House of Deputies supported Resolution A049 to authorize a rite of same-gender blessing for provisional use. Meyers and Ely were chair and vice chair, respectively, of the Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music, which proposed the rite to convention. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergThe liturgy “is a service of blessing for same-sex couples who are in lifelong, faithful monogamous, committed relationships,” Meyers said in a press briefing after the deputies adjourned. “With that service comes a whole package of resources.”The resources include a theological essay, guidance on canon law, materials to prepare couples for a blessing service and teaching materials inviting all in the church “into some conversation and theological reflection, whether or not they expect their congregations will at any time be prepared to host such services of blessing,” she said.The package currently can be found beginning on page 184 in the Blue Book. (The convention made some slight revisions to the version of the rite included in the report.)Before the house debated the resolution, the Very Rev. David Thurlow, a member of the Prayer Book, Liturgy and Church Music Committee and a deputy of the Diocese of South Carolina, gave the deputies a minority report.“For 2,000 years, the church has had clear teaching regarding marriage,” he said. Noting the committee’s concern about ecumenical relations in other areas, such as maintaining use of the Revised Common Lectionary, Thurlow said, “we haven’t taken heed of the universal voice of the church universal or the Anglican Communion.”“This resolution marks a clear and significant departure — theological, doctrinal and in worship — from the doctrine, discipline and worship of Christ as this church has received them,” he said. It introduces a “new theology of human sexuality.”During the debate, House of Deputies President Bonnie Anderson alternately called on proponents and opponents of the resolution.“The signs outside our church say all are welcome,” said Deputy Pete Ross of the Diocese of Michigan, who urged passage. “Do we need an asterisk?”The Rev. Charles Holt, Central Florida, commented on the unanimous house vote on a major structure resolution earlier in the session. “That actually very much moved me in a very powerful way. It was the first time I felt united with this group. But then, just a few minutes later, we’re going to receive … something that deeply divides us on very, very core values.”“Passing this resolution,” said the Ven. David Collum, deputy of the Diocese of Albany, “is just the majority wielding power against those with minority views saying, ‘We don’t care.’”Newark Deputy Caroline Christie explains her support of Resolution A049 to authorize a rite of same-gender blessing for provisional use July 10 during the house’s debate. ENS photo/Mary Frances SchjonbergThe Rev. Jack Zamboni, New Jersey, recalled playing the part of the “groom” in a test run of the liturgy at a Province 2 synod. “My reaction after having participated in that liturgy was that I wished [my wife] and I had had this liturgy when we were married six years ago. It’s a wonderful piece of liturgical work.”He described how a lesbian couple in his parish, together 30 years, cried when he told them convention would consider authorizing a rite that would bless their relationship. “They had never thought it would happen in their lifetime.”Some of the house’s young deputies recounted personal stories as they urged passage.Newark Deputy Caroline Christie, 18, recalled wondering as a child why her two aunts couldn’t marry. “There was no difference in their relationship except that they were both women. As I grew, I began to realize it was an issue of discrimination. … Same-sex couples should be able to be blessed by the church.”Deputy Ian Hallas, 22, of Chicago, likewise spoke about family: his sister and her civil union.“The love that she shares with her partner is unconditional and speaks to the ideal relationships all of us should strive to have,” he said.“I often get asked by churchgoers and non-churchgoers why I am a part of this body,” he said. “The reason I return is for my sister. I seek to assure that she not only has the same rites as myself but also the same privileges.”Before the vote, the house engaged in a complex and lengthy parliamentary discussion following a request to divide the resolution. Ultimately, the resolution was not divided, and deputies voted to approve the whole resolution. Deputies also voted down a request to refer the resolution to the SCLM.— Sharon Sheridan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention. Comments are closed. Kevin Kinnaird says: Nanci Warner says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

RIP: The Rev. William Bailey

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events People Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Posted Mar 8, 2013 Richard (Aspen) Eastman says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments (2) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN caspar f. wig says: Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY March 22, 2013 at 3:13 pm Each meeting with Deacon Bailey, although few,was an enjoyable experience. He radiated his love for the church, and, as the last quote captures, was humorously human. Good by, good soul. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Rev. William Bailey, who in 2004 became the first vocational deacon ordained in the Episcopal Diocese of Newark in more than a quarter century, died March 6 at his home in Morris Plains, New Jersey, after a long illness. He was 81.“All my life, I had wanted to be a priest,” Bailey told Episcopal Life in 2007. “I had always wanted to do that but never had the discipline to go to school and do the things I needed to do.”Deacon William Bailey sets the eucharistic table at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Morristown, New Jersey. Photo/Sharon SheridanInstead he married, had four children and “did everything else” a layman could do. “Almost every place we moved, I ended up somehow a warden,” he said.As a young man, Bailey worked as a live-in counselor at the St. Peter’s Home for Boys in Detroit. After marrying, he and his wife, Evelyn, lived rent-free in the rectory of the city’s St. Thomas Episcopal Church, which then had no clergy. Hired as the janitor, he became involved in pastoral work and was named the church’s missioner. Over the next three or four years, he conducted morning prayer services, launched a neighborhood basketball team and helped the parish grow from 13 parishioners to 33.Meanwhile, Bailey spent 27 years working for a division of General Motors that manufactured equipment for diesel transmissions. He spent a lot of time on the road, calling on potential clients such as fire departments and municipalities — what he called “engineering sales.”“We didn’t have an end product,” he explained. “We didn’t have a truck. We just had pieces, and you went and tried to convince people that these pieces that you had were what they needed to satisfy their needs.”“What I do [as a deacon] is what I was doing then,” said Bailey. “It’s dealing with people, trying to discover their needs and helping them. … Our product happens to be our Lord and Savior.”Because the call to ordination never left Bailey. Not during his GM years. Not while he subsequently taught mechanics and sales for a distributor who serviced diesel products (“I called it the care and feeding of diesels and transmissions.”) Not after he retired in 1993.He joined an Education for Ministry class at his parish, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Morristown, New Jersey, thinking it would help in him lay ministry. Then he discovered he could use it in place of seminary — and that his diocese was reinstituting the vocational diaconate. He “buckled down” to his studies and participated in Stephen Ministry. As a result of his clinical pastoral education, he because a chaplain at an area hospital.And on June 5, 2004, at age 72, he became the first of five vocational deacons ordained that day by then-Bishop Jack Croneberger – the first in the Diocese of Newark in more than 27 years, Bailey recalled.Bailey subsequently served as deacon at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Millington, New Jersey, and as a hospital chaplain and served on the diaconal ordination committee of the diocese’s Commission on Ministry. After retiring from All Saints’ in 2010, he continued to serve as deacon and pastoral associate at his home parish, St. Peter’s.Diocese of Newark Mark Beckwith will preach and celebrate at a worship service celebrating Bailey’s life on March 13 at 11 a.m. at St. Peter’s. Bailey is survived by his wife, four children, five grand children and five great-grandchildren.Looking back in 2007, Bailey said he saw God’s hand in all his family’s moves and ministries.“A call is real,” he said. “I think I felt this call from the time I was a boy.”Bailey said he didn’t regret not becoming a priest. “In fact, I’m so pleased that I’m not, because I’m doing the pastoral things that priests often don’t have an opportunity to do. They’re running churches. They’re worrying about budgets. They’re working with vestries. All of the things it takes to run a church is a major, major job. A part of it, as I see it, is being able to give the canonical blessings, to make sacred that which is not.”“But I am with the people where they are,” he said. “I do that servant ministry, which I really love. … It’s the ministry of every lay person. A deacon really should be the icon to the rest of the congregation, that this is how you live the lay life.”“It’s a wonderful ministry, absolutely a wonderful ministry,” he concluded. “And you get called reverend!” Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Obituary, Submit a Press Release Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA RIP: The Rev. William Bailey March 9, 2015 at 9:57 pm My wife (Jean Aspen) and I were blessed to have known Deacon Bill Bailey and his wife Evelyn – their demonstration of Faith and Love during Bill’s illness provided Jean and myself with an example of how to accept and live our lives when Jean became ill. Deacon Bill Bailey’s call to the ministry and his intersection with our lives was a gift. On this 2nd anniversary of Bill’s entry to eternal life, I want to say “Thank You Bill, for your guidance and support to so many of us who were in need” Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ last_img read more

RIP: Felipe Sanchez Paris

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Obituary, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Posted Aug 12, 2013 Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Felipe (Phillip L) Sanchez Paris, who was for a brief period acting director of elections for the City & County of San Francisco, died at home peacefully in his sleep July 31. Born in Gary, Indiana in 1941, he graduated from Georgetown University and the University of Southern California from which he received an M.A. in 1967 and a Ph.D. in 1973. The majority of his professional career was dedicated to facilitating multicultural education and equity in the public, nonprofit, and private sectors. He was recognized as a “change agent” in executive and management circles and was utilized widely as a consultant in organizational behavior and change. In 1973, Paris became the State Title I Coordinator, Continuing Education and Community Service. This federally funded program essentially worked through the institutional members of the California Post Secondary Education Commission.He then moved on to become the executive director of the Multicultural Equity Division of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory in Portland, Oregon. This technical training and technical assistance center provided services to elementary and secondary school districts in the Pacific Basin and the Pacific Northwest. From 1982 until 2000 he served as a professor of public policy and administration at California State University, Bakersfield where he was also acting graduate studies dean.Paris was an active lay leader in the Episcopal Diocese of California and a member of St. Gregory of Nyssa Church on Potrero Hill. In 2010, he played a key role in planning the Bay Area interfaith commemorations of the martyred Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador. For several years he was a member of the board of Bayview Opera House, which he felt was a natural extension of his commitment to the equal access of all children to quality educational programs.Paris is survived by his husband, Otis Charles, the retired Episcopal bishop of Utah; two brothers Adrian and John and their spouses; nine children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; four great grandchildren; numerous cousins in Almeria, Spain; and his San Francisco family and friends.There will be a Liturgy of Thanksgiving for the life of Felipe Sanchez Paris on Saturday, Aug. 24 at 3 p.m. at St, Gregory of Nyssa Church, 500 De Haro Street (at Mariposa), San Francisco. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to St. Gregory of Nyssa Food Bank. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ People Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL RIP: Felipe Sanchez Paris Educational leader was married to former Utah bishop Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Anglican Church of Canada launches ‘Jerusalem Sunday’

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events By ACNS staffPosted Apr 25, 2014 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Photo: Anglican Journal[Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church of Canada has announced a new annual church observance “to celebrate companionship in God’s mission with the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem in Jerusalem, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon and Syria”.Starting from this year, June 1 will be known as Jerusalem Sunday in Canada. To help Canadians to prepare for and celebrate the day, the church has produced a whole host of written and audio/visual resources.On a special section of its official website called Journey to Jerusalem Sunday, a church spokesperson writes, “The Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem have been companions in mission for many years, yet not much is known about this relationship.“Each year, numerous Canadians visit the Holy Land as pilgrims, students and tourists, yet many know little of the life and witness of Christians there — be they Palestinian, Arab Israeli, Jordanian, Lebanese or Syrian.“There is much to see, hear, experience and learn about being Anglican, being Christian in this ancient, troubled place today.“Journey to Jerusalem Sunday — a multimedia web page produced by the Anglican Journal and Anglican Video — intends to make the people and stories of Anglicans in the Holy Land come alive in word, image and sound.“We hope it will contribute to a greater understanding of how the ancestors of the first indigenous Christian community — “the living stones” — are living out their faith despite continuing social, political and economic hardships.”The province’s official publication, the Anglican Journal, wrote that their Canada’s Primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz described Jerusalem as “truly the mother of all who call themselves Christian, indeed all who call themselves Jew and Muslim,” adding, “There is room for everyone in Jerusalem.” Anglican Communion, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Church of Canada launches ‘Jerusalem Sunday’ Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Middle East Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Israel-Palestine, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more