Smarter Rugby with Ian McGeechan – Support Lines & Out Ball Drill

first_imgFriday Apr 16, 2010 Smarter Rugby with Ian McGeechan – Support Lines & Out Ball Drill We’ve got a few coaching tips for you ahead of the weekend as we catch up with the ASICS Smarter Rugby series featuring Ian McGeechan, who this week talks about support lines and positioning on attack.In the first clip McGeechan talks about the ball carrier having players on each shoulder with the option of popping to them just before contact, with them changing their running line to beat the defender. So you’re basically hitting the gap before catching the ball.The second video is similar in nature in that it’s also about changing your path before taking the ball, but this time it’s when hitting the outside of a defender, as discussed by Jeff Wilsonin a video I posted a while back.The trick is to time your run nicely after getting a long pass that allows you to drift outside before or while taking the ball, thus throwing off the would be tackler. It’s a great technique and one that can be used to great effect, providing the service is good from the inside man. Smarter Player + Smarter Boot = Smarter Rugby with Sir Ian McGeechan By learning how to become a Smarter Player and wearing the ASICS Smarter Boot, you can play Smarter Rugby with Sir Ian McGeechan. To win great prizes and find out more, go to www.asics.co.uk/rugby . ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. 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We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel ADVERTISEMENT Trending 6 DAYS AGO HUGE controversy sees Borthwick call Pat Lam a liar during heated Prem clash 5 DAYS AGO Melbourne Rebels do their best to wreck Bryn Gatland 4 DAYS AGO Lam’s explanation of bizarre situation that caused heated touchline argument 5 DAYS AGO François Steyn’s ridiculous 60-metre drop goal which left commentators in hysterics 1 WEEK AGO WATCH: Brutal footage of the fight between Jake Ball and Alun Wyn Jones Great Tries 5 DAYS AGO Eye-opening compilation shows why Taulupe Faletau could harm Springboks this Summer 5 DAYS AGO The time Waisale Serevi used his iconic hitch-kick to carve up Scotland in 2000 1 WEEK AGO Veainu finishes superb try after octopus style offload from Waisea 2 WEEKS AGO FULL MATCH REPLAY: Huge stars on show when All Blacks host Pacific Island XV in 2004 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Hooker produces ridiculous speed to score 60-metre wonder try for Hurricanes View All Big Hits & Dirty Play 23 HOURS AGO Awesome new Etzebeth montage will have Springboks fans psyched for Summer Lions tour 5 DAYS AGO Melbourne Rebels do their best to wreck Bryn Gatland 5 DAYS AGO Eye-opening compilation shows why Taulupe Faletau could harm Springboks this Summer 5 DAYS AGO Re-live O’Driscoll’s EPIC try-saving tackle in 2003 RWC quarter-final 1 WEEK AGO AWESOME video shows the very biggest and best tackles of the 2020/21 season View All See It To Believe It 4 DAYS AGO Cheetah racer Habana reveals what was actually going through his mind that day 4 DAYS AGO Lam’s explanation of bizarre situation that caused heated touchline argument 5 DAYS AGO François Steyn’s ridiculous 60-metre drop goal which left commentators in hysterics 5 DAYS AGO Re-live O’Driscoll’s EPIC try-saving tackle in 2003 RWC quarter-final 6 DAYS AGO HUGE controversy sees Borthwick call Pat Lam a liar during heated Prem clash View All Funnies 2 WEEKS AGO Joe Marler elated in special interview as fans return to The Stoop 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: One of the luckiest and most bizarre tries you will EVER see 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Reds players caught out in hilarious celebration blooper vs Chiefs 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Faz, Piutau and Burns star in hilarious try fail compilation 4 WEEKS AGO MLR: Giltinis howler sees try overruled despite attempts to celebrate View All Amateur 32 WEEKS AGO Viral video of Scottish club brawl goes down a storm with rugby community 69 WEEKS AGO RUGBYDUMP BLITZ: This Best of the Week round up is sure to entertain you 69 WEEKS AGO RD BLITZ – Disaster, just when it looked so promising… 69 WEEKS AGO That glorious moment that will live on forever, like it or not 69 WEEKS AGO RD Blitz – PROP’S Lionel Messi wizardy creates incredible try View All Player Features 15 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Bumping off tacklers and taking high balls, Rob Kearney had an impressive Super Rugby debut 21 WEEKS AGO Brian Moore on money in modern rugby and how it should never be compared to ‘outlier’ football 22 WEEKS AGO Tuisova’s wrecking ball montage will make you grateful you never made it as a pro 28 WEEKS AGO New Zealand rugby pod admit Owen Farrell is world class 29 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Bath prop launches Amazon documentary focused on those from non-traditional backgrounds View All Related Content from the RugbyPass Network ‘What you do today is how you’re going to be remembered’: Spirit of Rugby – Ep 5 In Spirit of Rugby episode 5, Jim Hamilton talks Lions with Matt Dawson, Jeremy Guscott, Rob Kearney, Simon Shaw, Tom Croft and John Bentley. Watch: Reforging the Steelers | Episode 2 | RugbyPass Original Documentary In Episode 2 of Reforging the Steelers, we follow the team through rounds two to four as they try to get their season on track after an opening loss to competition powerhouses Tasman. Shock result: Crusaders left to rue costly errors with win over Rebels not enough for final guarantee In a shock result, the Crusaders have failed to record the requisite winning margin needed over the Rebels to book themselves a spot in the Super Rugby Trans-Tasman final and are now reliant on the Blues dropping the ball against the Force. ‘I deliberately haven’t mentioned it too much this week’: Tim Sampson keeping mum ahead of Blues battle The Western Force aim to play the role of party poopers on Saturday when they take on the ladder-leading Blues at a venue that shall not be named. Highlanders player ratings vs Brumbies | Super Rugby Trans-Tasman The Highlanders have given themselves a decent shout at playing in the Super Rugby Trans-Tasman final. Who were the top dogs in what was effectively a semi-final showdown with the Brumbies? Hurricanes player ratings vs Reds | Super Rugby Trans-Tasman How did the Hurricanes rate in their final game of Super Rugby Trans-Tasman, their 43-14 victory over the Reds? Smarter Rugby with Ian McGeechan – Support Lines & Out Ball Drill | RugbyDump – Rugby News & Videos RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Sitemap Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Sign In Username or Email Password Stay logged in Forgot password Thank you for registering Click here to login Register Register now for RugbyDump commenting & enewsletter. * Required fields. Username * Password * Email * Password Repeat * Please send me news, information and special offers from RugbyDump By clicking register you agree to our Privacy Policylast_img read more

Limerick leads call to rule out sale

first_imgPrint Shannondoc operating but only by appointment Fianna Fáil Social Protection spokesman Willie O’Dea is leading calls on the Government to firmly rule out the sale of the State’s shareholding in Aer Lingus now that the Minister for Transport appears to have finally recognised its strategic importance.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Limerick TD’s intervention comes in the wake of a statement from Transport Minister Pascal Donohue’s statement that “the information and commitments provided to date do not at present provide a basis on which the Government could give an irrevocable commitment to accept an offer to dispose of its shares, should one be made by IAG.”He added that “In line with stated policy, the Government remains open to considering any improved proposal which IAG may bring to the steering group”.Deputy O’Dea said, “I am pleased that Minister Donohoe finally appears to have realised the strategic importance of the State’s stake in Aer Lingus. In the national interest and particularly in the interest of the Mid-West, the Government must now take a firm stand and say that the citizens’ stake in the national airline is not for sale.“This is vital, as any such sale could see Aer Lingus’ critical Heathrow slots siphoned off, risking future connectivity and jobs at Shannon airport.“When he briefed the Oireachtas Transport committee, IAG chief executive Willie Walsh failed to offer a guarantee on the Heathrow Boston and New York routes from Shannon. Therefore, the Minister’s attempt to kick any decision further down the road by seeking more meaningless ‘assurances’ is simply not good enough.” the Limerick deputy said.Having briefed his Cabinet colleagues this week on the latest position in relation to the IAG proposal to make an offer for Aer Lingus, the Minister reiterated the Government’s underlying position in relation to its shareholding in Aer Lingus.The minority holding which the State has in Aer Lingus would not be sold unless the market conditions were favourable, the terms of the sale were satisfactory to the Government and an acceptable price could be secured, he said.“The Government has acknowledged the strategic importance of aviation to Ireland as an island nation where over 80 per cent of passenger movements into and out of Ireland are by air.“Ireland’s aviation policy has, for decades, favoured competition by seeking to have at least two major airlines with significant home bases competing in the Irish market.  Aer Lingus also supports significant numbers of jobs and is in the top 50 of Irish employers.“In considering the IAG proposal, the Government has also taken into account the fact that three takeover bids have been made for Aer Lingus since 2006. Successive Governments have opposed these bids primarily on competition grounds. The Government will continue to pursue a policy based on competition between at least two airlines with significant home bases in the Irish market.The Minister said the statement from IAG in which the company indicated that it is willing to offer a commitment not to dispose of Aer Lingus’ existing Heathrow slots, including to any other company in the IAG Group, without Government approval. IAG has also stated that it will offer a commitment to continue operating Aer Lingus’ existing slots at Heathrow for routes to Ireland and would commit to operating services from Shannon and Cork on the current schedule of four daily services from Cork and three from Shannon for five years. Email Advertisement No vaccines in Limerick yet Linkedin Facebook Previous articleThis week’s PostNext articleIrish Water reveal plans to tackle Limerick’s water leaks Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. BusinessNewsLocal NewsLimerick leads call to rule out saleBy Bernie English – February 26, 2015 832 center_img Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSAer LinhusfeaturedHeathrowShannon Airport Willie O’Dea WhatsApp First Irish death from Coronavirus Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Twitter Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHLlast_img read more

The important partnership between credit unions and small businesses

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Curt Long Curt Long was named director of research and chief economist in August 2014. In this role, he serves as the association’s chief economic analyst, conducting economic and financial policy … Web: www.nafcu.org Details Since the inception of the credit union industry, there has been a connection between credit unions and small businesses. Both institutions were founded on helping local communities and working towards providing valuable services and products to Main Street consumers. A lot of credit unions are small businesses solely serving the needs of their local community. As the credit union industry continues to grow, so does their lending portfolio, especially regarding member business lending. Even though credit unions face regulatory limitations, small businesses still prefer the personalized member-lending experience credit unions offer. Over the past 10 years, the number of credit unions offering business loans has increased 20 percent. Today, a small business can get a loan at more than 2,000 credit unions. For 18 percent of credit unions, business loans make up at least 5 percent of their total loan portfolio. A decade ago that figure was just 8 percent.That growth stands in stark contrast to recent trends at other financial institutions, and speaks to credit unions’ increasing role in funding America’s small businesses. Since 2007, total business loans extended by credit unions have tripled. Banks, on the other hand, have cut their outstanding loans to small businesses 8 percent over that same time. The Federal Reserve’s triennial Survey of Consumer Finances shows a similar rise in the importance of credit unions to small businesses. The share of household business owners that used credit unions to start or acquire their business grew from 2.4 percent in 2010 to 6.3 percent in 2016.All this growth has taken place amid the backdrop of a severe decline in business dynamism. Startups are becoming rarer, and consolidation is a feature of many industries. The U.S. Census Bureau has two sources of data related to business dynamism. The Business Dynamics Statistics (BDS) database provides annual data on startups as a share of total businesses through 2015. The bureau’s Business Formation Statistics (BFS) is a recently released database with more current quarterly estimates of startup activity. The chart below shows both datasets, and each confirms a sizable drop in business formations around the mid-2000s. While the national picture may not be pretty, the BFS data, just unveiled in February, allow us to take a closer look. The map below shows per capita startups in 2017 by state. The most vibrant states have formation rates that are twice as high as the weakest ones. But is there any hope for a turnaround? Policymakers have taken note. Former Fed Chair Janet Yellen, observing the decline in business formations, stated that it could lead to lower productivity, wage growth, and employment, along with increased income inequality. Those sentiments were echoed by the Congressional Joint Economic Committee’s 2018 Annual Report, which focused its discussion of the weak economic recovery on the decline in business formations. The committee’s top recommendation was to reduce regulatory burden on small businesses.The good news for credit unions is that even if the status quo persists, they have proven that they can operate successful business lending programs in such an environment. And if policymakers do create more favorable conditions for startups, credit unions would be well positioned to capitalize.          Business Formations per 1,000 People (2017)last_img read more

Fort St. John opposing the privatization of Ridley Terminals

first_imgCouncilors voted unanimously to send the letter to Steven Harper, although Mayor Bruce Lantz and Councilor Dan Davies did not attend the meeting. Fort St. John will be advocating to keep Ridley Terminals a public asset. At Tuesday’s special meeting, City Councilors agreed to send a letter to Prime Minister Steven Harper, urging him to step in. Councilor Lori Ackerman and Mayor Bruce Lantz are part of the Northern Development Initiative Trust, which opposes the sale of the terminals into private interests. – Advertisement -Ackerman says in mid-May, the Chair of the Board of Ridley Terminals was advocating a sale. She says selling the Terminal to private business would negatively affect northern BC. [asset|aid=1456|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=0a64ae3aa9fc2c338ee3c06d71db6af8-Ackerman – Ridley 2_1_Pub.mp3]Ackerman says if that’s not enough of a reason for opposition, the sale is also a bit suspicious. Advertisement [asset|aid=1457|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=91cd162858cde968b8ccf7aee64ea8f2-Ackerman- Ridley 1_1_Pub.mp3] Now, Fort St. John M-P Jay Hill and his federal and provincial counterparts are also pushing to keep Ridley a public asset.According to a recent article in the Globe and Mail, Hill isn’t backing down, saying it would be “completely irresponsible” for him not to voice his concerns about the impact of privatization and/or higher fees in the area. The Ridley Terminals are located in Prince Rupert. Advertisementlast_img read more

WEATHER WARNING AS 100KM/HR STORM SET TO BATTER DONEGAL

first_imgMET Eireann has issued a weather warning for Donegal this weekend.Forecasters say winds could reach speeds of up to or more than 100km/hr.That’s strong enough to cause damage. The warning comes after a miserable Saturday morning in which torrential rain once again hit the county.A Met Eireann spokesman told Donegal Daily this evening: “Sunday will be a very windy, blustery day with strong to gale force southwest to west winds gusting 90 to 100 km/hr.“These will be strongest in the North West and could be higher than 100km/hr.“Showers will become widespread too, many heavy and some possibly thundery.” Winds will reduce into Sunday night.At the moment a storm threatening to hit southern parts of Ireland and Britain on Monday aren’t expected to reach Donegal.However the forecast for the next few days is for more wet weather.MET EIREANN Wind Warning for Ireland issued at 6pm SaturdayStrong to gale force southwest to westerly winds will gust 80 to 90 km/h., at times during Sunday. Winds may occasionally gust up to 100 km/h., along parts of the West and Northwest coasts.  Issued:Saturday 26 October 2013 18:00Valid:Sunday 27 October 2013 06:00 to Sunday 27 October 2013 15:00 WEATHER WARNING AS 100KM/HR STORM SET TO BATTER DONEGAL was last modified: October 26th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:damagedonegaldonegal daily weatherWarningweatherwindslast_img read more

Ja’Quan Gardner scores four touchdowns, Humboldt State thumps Simon Fraser

first_imgIt took all of one play for Ja’Quan Gardner to add to his school-record rushing total.Gardner — who became the Jacks’ all-time leading rusher last Saturday night at the Redwood Bowl — took his first carry of Saturday night’s game 87 yards to the house and the No. 25-nationally ranked Humboldt State football team never looked back in a 56-24 win over Simon Fraser in Burnaby, British Columbia.“Give credit to our players for not looking at records, dealing with a long trip and coming out right …last_img read more

Archaeology Is Hindered by Evolutionary Assumptions

first_imgWhy was a complex village uncovered in Uruguay called “unexpected”?  Peter W. Stahl (anthropology, Binghamtom U.) asks the question in the Dec. 2 issue of Nature:1Evidence of unexpected complexity in an ancient community in Uruguay is a further blow to the conventional view of prehistoric development in marginal areas of lowland South America.    Archaeological research often reveals unexpected results.  This is common in South America, especially when archaeologists venture off the beaten track to explore unfamiliar areas.  However, our surprise is also a product of our preconceptions.  Recent work in the lowlands of tropical South America clearly bears this out, with discoveries of prehistoric complexity in unforeseen places and/or times.  On page 614 of this issue, Iriarte et al. present another example of precocious development in a hitherto little-explored and under-appreciated area.  The authors refer humbly to their results as unexpected; but given the profusion of surprises elsewhere, why would they be unexpected in the first place?The answer is that for over 60 years, archaeologists have been taught to think certain ways about marginal areas and primitive peoples.  They have been taught an “now-outmoded belief in cultural evolution, culture areas and trait diffusion; environmental determinism; a sketchy archaeological record; and an underestimation of the effects of European conquest on native populations,” Stahl claims.  Authorities like Julian Steward inculcated notions of slow urban development gradually creeping to outlying areas, and ‘traditional Indians’ living out their simple lives, surviving “relatively unchanged since deep time.”  Stahl takes issue with this, noting the number of contradictions with the evidence.  “Although few would buy into these ideas today,” he says, “Steward’s culture history has had an enormous impact on archaeological interpretation, both academic and popular.”    It’s hard to dislodge old myths.  Stahl is not surprised by the complexity of outlying villages, like the one by Iriarte et al. that showed:a large formal village plan, consisting of mound and plaza features, at a time (more than 4,000 years ago) and in a place where conventional wisdom would not have expected them to exist.  Moreover, subsequent occupation, intentional remodelling, settlement planning and village size indicate both a permanence and a density of population previously unthought of for this area.  Innovative analyses of plant microfossils and starch grains extracted from stone tools yield evidence for the early exploitation of maize, squash, beans and root crops in an area that was long considered non-agricultural, at least for prehistoric populations.It appears these people were doing what humans have always done: applying their brains and intentions to organize their lives with intelligence and skill.  This example “not only rejects much of the interpretational baggage carried by generations of archaeologists, but also exposes the potential for prehistoric culture in grasslands and wetlands, which were historically viewed as marginal areas,” he says.  In conclusion, he preaches, “Marginality and atrophied development are part of a flawed historic perspective.  Our expectations for indigenous achievements should be greater.”1Peter W. Stahl, “Archaeology: Greater expectations,” Nature 432, 561 – 562 (02 December 2004); doi:10.1038/432561a.Who gave the scientific world an image of primitive man evolving in marginal areas, living hand to mouth with very slow cultural evolution?  Who portrayed the relatively recent cities as the places where the lights of humanity first went on, and progress slowly spread into the outlying areas?  Was it not the Darwinists in Victorian Britain, who tended to view themselves as the intellectually superior race?  The history of Darwinian racism and treatment of indigenous peoples is a shameful lesson that has no justification today, as Stahl points out.    In contrast, Biblical creationists would see man as always fully man, endowed from the beginning with free will, language, culture and intelligence.  People groups spread rapidly over the globe after the flood, carrying a good deal of cultural memory with them.  Just because they didn’t always make pottery does not mean they weren’t good farmers or knew how to build complex villages.  Creationists would see a gradual degradation of ability because of sin, with occasional collective rises and falls of civilizations; there is also the counteracting tendency for technological knowledge to increase and accumulate over time.  Overall, creationists have greater expectations about indigenous achievements, and therefore are not surprised to find complexity in human cultures from the earliest times.  And that is exactly what archaeology shows: man is always fully man, capable of remarkable achievements, but needing salvation and escape from the “flawed historical perspective” of false teachers.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

More Early Man Troubles (Again)

first_imgBones have a way of whacking the stories made up about them.Several problems have come up in the news about human evolution.Homo naledi: John Hawks is frustrated that nobody has settled on a date for this South African cave dweller. The latest guess is 912,000 years, but that’s too young for many, given its supposedly primitive state. If it really lived that late, according to Charles Q. Choi on Live Science, paleoanthropologists will have to change their picture of human evolution. It would mean early Africa was a melting pot of species that lived around the same time, not one species evolving to replace another on the advance to modernity. This is not an exact science, mind you:Collard said he expected this new age estimate would draw a lot of skepticism from other scientists. “Their skepticism will be entirely understandable,” he said. “Even now, I remain a bit skeptical about it. I think it’s well-enough supported to put it out there, but I’m not about to bet my house on it. That said, I think it’s worth the field pondering the implications for our understanding of human evolution if the age estimate is about right and H. naledi is around a million years old.”Homo floresiensis: Evidence that modern humans were using fire on the same island as the famous “hobbit” humans only 41,000 years ago tosses new confusion into the picture in Indonesia. The “rather unexpected” finding, according to PhysOrg, might help explain why the hobbits disappeared, assuming the moderns drove them to extinction. But why modern, physically and mentally capable people would limit themselves to a life of building campfires from 41,000 years ago to 24,000 years ago without making cities and farms remains a conundrum (see 6/10/16). 17,000 years of that kind of simple life is longer than all recorded human history from villages to the space age.Homo sapiens in Borneo: A specimen found in a Borneo cave is “full of surprises,” PhysOrg writes. Why? “A new study of the 37,000-year old remains of the ‘Deep Skull’ – the oldest modern human discovered in island South-East Asia – has revealed this ancient person was not related to Indigenous Australians, as had been originally thought,” the article says. That’s surprise one. “The Deep Skull was also likely to have been an older woman, rather than a teenage boy.” That’s surprise two. In fact, the bones look like the people of Borneo today. So other than getting the gender, age, and relations wrong, is everything else hunky-dory? “Our analysis overturns long-held views about the early history of this region.”On The Conversation, Robert Foley from Cambridge asserts that “we have been looking at human evolution the wrong way.” Who’s we, paleface? you might be asking, looking at the photo of a museum ape-man at the beginning of his piece.Understanding exactly how and why humans evolved is clearly one of the most important goals in science. But despite a significant amount of research to date, these questions have remained a bit of a mystery. Of course, there is no shortage of theories – it has even been suggested that humans are just visiting aliens. However, most of the credible models tend to take something that is unique to humans – such as language – and show how all the other bits of being human derive from that.So does Foley have a better theory to offer? Not really; his ideas are a hodgepodge of gradualism, mosaicism and cooperation. He thinks most of our ancestors were small folk. “We may picture our ancestors as rugged versions of ourselves, tall and strong, but they were not,” he claims. “We need to start thinking of them as creatures that were as unique as ourselves, but in different ways.” If we need to “start thinking” of them differently, it implies we (that is, anthropologists) “have been thinking” of them incorrectly. His conclusion: more research is needed.Why do we listen to these guys? They keep changing their stories. They don’t know what they are talking about. The long ages are concocted to keep Charlie’s story going, facts or not.Collard wants us to be skeptical, so be skeptical. Take a look at the record book. It makes perfect sense. People don’t sit around in caves for hundreds of thousands of years. They spread out and achieve great things. It’s what we do today; it’s what humans have always done. (Visited 58 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

BRICS bank ‘to boost South Africa’

first_img26 June 2012The development bank planned by members of the BRICS group of influential emerging economies could help South Africa finance its state-led infrastructure drive, says Business Unity SA CEO Nomaxabiso Majokweni.According to I-Net Bridge, Majokweni told an African National Congress (ANC) business forum in Johannesburg on Monday that an immediate benefit of a BRICS bank would be “a massive injection in our infrastructure development plan, which could help the government meet some of its very ambitious growth targets”.At the BRICS summit in New Delhi, India in March, the leaders of the five countries considered a proposal to set up a BRICS-led South-South Development Bank, funded and managed by the BRICS and other developing countries.Such a bank could help its member countries pool resources for infrastructure development and lend among themselves during difficult global times.Majokweni said on Monday that a BRICS bank would “promote growth and investment in its member states and other emerging markets, and will be a strong voice in the lobbying for the reform of international financial institutions”.The bank could be launched as early as 2013, when South Africa hosts the next BRICS leaders summit.BRICS financial safety net discussedLast week, South African President Jacob Zuma, Chinese President Hu Jintao, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Russian President Vladimir Putin and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh met on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Mexico.During their meeting last Monday, the five leaders discussed the possibility of setting up a currency swap arrangement and a foreign exchange reserve pool within the five-member framework.The foreign exchange reserve pool would act as a financial safety net, creating a joint pool of reserves to be used in case any member country was faced with sudden capital flight.BRICS agree to help recapitalise IMFThe Brics leaders also agreed that they would contribute to a recapitalisation of the International Monetary Fund (IMF).On the Tuesday following the meeting, South Africa announced that it was commiting US$2-billion of its foreign reserves to the IMF’s firewall fund to help prevent future financial crises.Business Day reports that International Relations Minister Maite Nkoane-Mashabane, also addressing the ANC’s business forum on Monday, said the IMF loan would help South Africa gain influence internationally.“This pledge by BRICS countries is in line with the provision to transform institutions of global governance,” Business Day quoted Nkoane-Mashabane as saying.“It has been a tradition … that decisions in international financial institutions are made and influenced by countries with strong financial muscles. The more we contribute … the better the prospects for us as a country to influence decisions.”Mexican President Felipe Calderon, in comments on the weekend reported by London’s Financial Times, noted that this was the first time that the IMF was being recapitalised without the participation of the US, “which reflects the importance of emerging markets”.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

How Is Windows 8 Going To Do? Microsoft Doesn’t Want To Talk About It

first_imgTags:#enterprise#Microsoft 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Related Posts Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…center_img Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… markhachman How well does Microsoft expect Windows 8 to do? Oddly enough, the company doesn’t want to talk about it. And while maybe the company just being careful, this is not an encouraging sign.On a conference call Thursday afternoon, Wall Street analysts pressed Microsoft executives for specifics about expectations for the forthcoming version of Windows. But Microsoft refused to make any predictions.Analysts have reason to be concerned. Windows 8 represents a radical overhaul of the company’s flagship operating system, one that that some fear may be so radical that it will turn customers off.“We’ll see how it goes,” Microsoft CFO Peter Klein said when pushed for specifics on how the company expects Windows 8, Windows RT or its Surface tablet to sell.Microsoft Needs Windows 8 To Be A HitMicrosoft needs a strong launch from Windows 8, given that the current state of the PC market is so weak. IDC and Gartner reported that unit sales fell more than 8% during the third quarter.Whether that is because of consumers moving to alternatives like tablets or just waiting for Windows 8 remains to be seen.Meanwhile, Microsoft is hurting. In the quarter that endeed in September sales and earnings both declined from from last year. Net income dropped 22% to $4.47 billion. Revenue dropped 7.83% to $16.01 billion from $17.37 billion last year.The official revenue figure did not include revenue of $1.36 billion that was deferred as a result of a program to offer a discounted upgrade to Windows 8 for those who purchased PCs early. But even factoring in the deferral, Microsoft’s revenue was essentially flat compared to a year ago.The results fell short of analyst expectations. Wall Street had been looking for earnings of 56 cents a share (versus the 53 cents per share that Microsoft reported) and revenue of $16.42 billion.Klein attributed Microsoft’s poor performance to a “challenging PC market,” a poor macroeconomic environment, as well as a “normal slowdown in advance of Windows 8.”Microsoft’s Windows division was particularly hard hit. The Windows & Windows Live business posted revenue of $3.24 billion, down a whopping 33% from last year.Even accounting for the impact of the Windows Upgrade Offer and pre-sales of Windows 8 to hardware makers prior to general availability, revenue fell by 9%. Microsoft said it expects to recognize $800 million from pre-sales of Windows 8 during the first quarter.The one bright spot? The company said Windows 8 pre-sale revenue was 40% higher than the comparable period for Windows 7. “We’re certainly very excited about Windows 8 and the capabilities that come from that,” Klein said, adding that he was “encouraged” from the Windows sell-in numbers.Hints From The Chip MakersWhat little we know about the expected success of Windows 8 comes from three sources so far: Microsoft itself, and Intel and AMD, who ship chips to PC and tablet makers. None has been particularly effusive.Intel reported that during the third quarter its PC processor business grew at about half the rate that the company expected. Worse still, Intel chief executive Paul Otellini said he expected that trend to continue into the fourth quarter, as OEMs bought half their usual amount of PC processors. That reflects weak demand for PCs, as well as a cautious approach to Microsoft’s Windows 8.Computer makers “are taking a cautious inventory approach in the face of market uncertainty and the timing of the Windows 8 launch,” Intel chief executive Paul Otellini said, according to a transcript of the call.He added, however, that Intel saw an uptick in sales late in the quarter, as its customers started building Windows 8 machines.AMD is struggling too. After reporting a $157 million loss and a 10% revenue decline, the company announced that it would lay off 15% of its employees as part of a restructuring. CEO Rory Read was not optimistic about the state of the PC market.“Broader macroeconomic issues are impacting consumer PC spend,” Read said in prepared remarks on Thursday. “OEMs are also taking a cautious approach to managing inventory in advance of the Windows 8 launch and tablets continue to grow as a consumer device of choice. As a result we faced a very challenging selling environment, especially in the lower-end of the consumer client space.”How Did Other Parts Of Microsoft Do?Microsoft’s other business-focused divisions, usually a reliable engine of growth, fared fairly well. Revenue at Microsoft’s Business Division fell 2%, although that also factored in deferred revenue that would have otherwise reported a 1% boost.The Online Services Division reported revenue of $697 million, a 9% increase, but the division lost money, again. The company’s Server and Tools division grew 8% to $4.55 billion. It was the only Microsoft business division to show an increase in profits.Many of Microsoft’s key Windows customers will be reporting earnings soon, allowing Wall Street analysts to grill executives on their fourth quarter outlooks.There are two ways to interpret Microsoft’s relative silence on Windows 8. Maybe the company is just being cautious. Or maybe Microsoft senses a disappointment – or something even worse – heading its way.Question mark image courtesy of Shutterstock.last_img read more