United Way of Thurston County celebrates Community Stewardship at 10th Annual…

first_imgFacebook7Tweet0Pin0Submitted by United Way of Thurston  CountyUnited Way of Thurston County will celebrate its 10th Annual Straight from the Heart Dinner Party and Auction on Saturday, February 9, 2019, at the SPSCC Lacey TwinStar Event Center.Guests will enjoy local beer and spirits during cocktail hour as well as romance-inspiring appetizers – all set to live music and not-to-be-missed entertainment. Guests will have an opportunity to bid on silent and live auction items. All proceeds benefit the programs of United Way of Thurston County.After dinner, if you’re in the mood, swing on over to a 1940s inspired after-party complete with “big band” sound and dancing to the tunes of Vendredi’s Bag! We’ll have some swing-dance professionals on site to make sure everyone is out there on the dance floor.“Community members are joining together to support our mission to fight for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community we serve,” said Chris Wells, executive director of United Way. “Straight from the Heart helps fund crucial programs beyond what our donors and workplace campaigns provide, AND it is also an evening to celebrate our generous community, their hard-work and philanthropy.”WHO: United Way of Thurston CountyWHAT: Straight from the Heart Dinner Party & AuctionTICKET INFORMATION: Purchase tickets here.WHEN: Saturday, February 9, 2019. Cocktail hour begins at 5:00 p.m. and dinner is served at 6:30 p.m.WHERE: SPSCC Lacey TwinStar Event Center, 4220 6th Avenue SE, Lacey, Washington.ABOUT: United Way of Thurston County fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in our community.last_img read more

Longtime Two River Times Music Writer ‘Uncle Mike’ Dies

first_imgBy John Burton |The Two River Times has lost one of its earliest and most influential voices.Michael Lisa, 68, who for many years wrote the rock and roll music column “Night Grooves” under the byline “Uncle Mike,” died on Thursday, Sept. 28, after a lengthy battle with cancer.Lisa’s column, which he wrote until retiring a few years ago, became a must-read for the denizens of the Jersey Shore music scene and those simply interested in live music. Starting not long after the weekly community newspaper was founded in 1990, Lisa began writing his column, detailing who was playing and where, but also offering reviews of recently released recordings by area artists and live performances, in both large and small venues, and sitting down with those singers, songwriters and musicians to provide insight into their creative process and influences on their work.Over the years his work gained attention in the music orbit, with artists seeking out Lisa’s attention for his reviews, sometimes strongly worded but never cruel.“I think what he did was keep live music alive,” said Norman Seldin, a veteran performer and recording artist who said he considered Lisa a friend. “If you were into live music, you knew who Uncle Mikey was.”Pat Guadagno is a singer/musician long on the Jersey Shore scene and noted for his annual “BobFest” tribute show to Bob Dylan. Early in Guadagno’s music career, his work came to the attention of Lisa’s Night Grooves, “at a very crucial time, when I had serious doubts about my musical career,” Guadagno said.“With just one stroke of, what we used to jokingly refer to as his ‘poison pen,’” Guadagno recalled, “Mike assured you that someone was listening and enjoying what you do.”Singer/songwriter and recording artist Karen Mansfield recalled her first mention in Night Grooves, when Lisa offered a tough assessment of her performance at an Asbury Park nightspot in 1993. Mansfield came to realize shortly that Lisa’s review was on the money and the two developed a friendship that lasted until his death. “He had a great passion for the musicians and participants on the scene and helped us in ways that are just immeasurable,” Mansfield said, noting she has kept many of the columns containing references to her. “He made me feel like a million bucks.”“I’ll always remember him. He was a friend. He was a comrade in music,” said Bobby Bandiera, a guitarist who has played with Bon Jovi, Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes and Bruce Springsteen during benefit concerts, as well as fronting his own band.Claudia Ansorge, who founded The Two River Times and served as its first publisher, considered Lisa a friend “who had a lot of great qualities,” not the least being his generosity. “He was also the hippest thing about the paper from the time he came on,” she noted.“I feel I lost a member of my family – my TRT family,” said Eileen Moon, former managing editor of The Two River Times.This article was first published in the Oct.5-12, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Nelson Senior Leafs sweep past competition at Castlegar Novice Tournament

first_imgFresh off a successful performance in the Heritage City, the Nelson Senior Leafs took the show on the road to capture the Castlegar Novice tournament Sunday in the Sunflower City.The Senior Leafs won all three games by a combined 25-4 scored.Nelson opened the tournament by stopping Greater Trail Snipers 12-0 on goals by Max Jean, Cash Linnen, Griffen Wanhella, Miller Tedesco, two from Larson Proctor and a hatrick from both Jack Boyes and Wyatt Groenhuysen. Shea Anderson registered the shutout.Nelson kept on rolling, blasting Cranbrook Key City Drywall 8-2 Saturday.Jack Boyes had another hat trick with singles going to Kale Gehrmann, Cohen Wolbaum, Sawan Bhabra and Larson Proctor.Goalie Shea Anderson stopped a lot of great shots and pretty much stood on his head.Sunday Nelson completed the sweep edging Creston Valley Chiefs 5-2.Wyatt and Grady Groenhuysen scored along with Miller Tedesco.last_img read more

The 100-1 Club featured on BizBash.com

first_img10 New Venues in Los Angeles for Spring Meetings & Events#5. The 100 to 1 ClubIn January, Santa Anita Park unveiled its newest destination, the 100 to 1 Club. The revamped space offers panoramic views of the racetrack in a luxury lounge atmosphere. The new club spans 4,000 square feet at the first turn of the track, in an area formerly known as the Gallop Out. The space underwent extensive renovations, including an architectural overhaul that added terraced seating, eliminated exterior walls, and elevated the main floor to maximize sight lines. There’s exposed steel infrastructure overhead, and original curved concrete walls with hexagonal windows. Throne-like banquette seating set beneath the base of Santa Anita’s iconic spire provide visual interest within the space. A historic neon sign lights the bar area, and the former concrete parapet in front of the space was replaced with a glass partition, adding natural light and views. Private bar and wagering machines separate a suite with room for 75, with outdoor, covered seating, and amenities. The club has room for private events for as may as 150. It’s the latest space to be unveiled as part of Santa Anita Park’s ongoing multiyear renovation.100-1 Club feature on BizBash.comlast_img read more

Secular Geology Admits to Rapid Canyon Formation by Megafloods

first_imgIt’s hard to deny catastrophic canyon formation when you have the evidence right in front of you.  Look what happened in Texas a few years ago, as reported by PhysOrg:In the summer of 2002, a week of heavy rains in Central Texas caused Canyon Lake – the reservoir of the Canyon Dam – to flood over its spillway and down the Guadalupe River Valley in a planned diversion to save the dam from catastrophic failure.  The flood, which continued for six weeks, stripped the valley of mesquite, oak trees, and soil; destroyed a bridge; and plucked meter-wide boulders from the ground.  And, in a remarkable demonstration of the power of raging waters, the flood excavated a 2.2-kilometer-long, 7-meter-deep canyon in the bedrock.The actual canyon was formed in just three days, said Science Daily.  Live Science also reported the story, saying, “Some of the most spectacular canyons on Earth and Mars were probably formed in the geologic blink of an eye, suggests a new study that found clues to their formation deep in the heart of Texas.”    Such catastrophic floods and canyons that resulted are not unknown in historic times, but what’s new is that geologists are taking note and applying the lesson of Canyon Lake to large, prehistoric megafloods on earth and even Mars.  PhysOrg continued, “Our traditional view of deep river canyons, such as the Grand Canyon, is that they are carved slowly, as the regular flow and occasionally moderate rushing of rivers erodes rock over periods of millions of years.”  Quoting Michael Lamb of Caltech, co-author of a paper in Nature Geoscience,1 the article said that such is not always the case: “We know that some big canyons have been cut by large catastrophic flood events during Earth’s history.”    Lamb went on to explain that there is not often an easy way to tell a catastrophically-formed canyon from a gradually-formed one:Unfortunately, these catastrophic megafloods – which also may have chiseled out spectacular canyons on Mars—generally leave few telltale signs to distinguish them from slower events.  “There are very few modern examples of megafloods,” Lamb says, “and these events are not normally witnessed, so the process by which such erosion happens is not well understood.”  Nevertheless, he adds, “the evidence that is left behind, like boulders and streamlined sediment islands, suggests the presence of fast water”—although it reveals nothing about the time frame over which the water flowed.Lamb found that process like “plucking” – in which boulders popped up from fractured bedrock became sledgehammers in the current, and headward-eroding waterfalls, led to quick downward erosion of the canyon.  He hopes the features witnessed in the Canyon Lake flood will aid in interpreting megaflood evidence on earth and Mars.  Here is the abstract from the paper by Lamb and Fonstad:Deep river canyons are thought to form slowly over geological time (see, for example, ref. 1 [Grand Canyon]), cut by moderate flows that reoccur every few years 2, 3.  In contrast, some of the most spectacular canyons on Earth and Mars were probably carved rapidly during ancient megaflood events 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12.  Quantification of the flood discharge, duration and erosion mechanics that operated during such events is hampered because we lack modern analogues.  Canyon Lake Gorge, Texas, was carved in 2002 during a single catastrophic flood 13.  The event offers a rare opportunity to analyse canyon formation and test palaeo-hydraulic-reconstruction techniques under known topographic and hydraulic conditions.  Here we use digital topographic models and visible/near-infrared aerial images from before and after the flood, discharge measured during the event, field measurements and sediment-transport modelling to show that the flood moved metre-sized boulders, excavated ~7 m of limestone and transformed a soil-mantled valley into a bedrock canyon in just ~3 days.  We find that canyon morphology is strongly dependent on rock type: plucking of limestone blocks produced waterfalls, inner channels and bedrock strath terraces, whereas abrasion of cemented alluvium sculpted walls, plunge pools and streamlined islands.  Canyon formation was so rapid that erosion might have been limited by the ability of the flow to transport sediment.  We suggest that our results might improve hydraulic reconstructions of similar megafloods on Earth and Mars.Their references included the paper by J H Bretz on the channeled scablands of Washington, and other research on the Lake Bonneville floods, but no work by creation geologists who have postulated rapid formation of the Grand Canyon by a dam breach megaflood.  They did not discuss the Grand Canyon in their paper other than to state in the introduction that “Most bedrock river canyons are thought to be cut slowly over millions of years (for example, Grand Canyon, USA, ref. 1) by moderate flows that reoccur every few years.”  They did not say whether they agree with that assessment now in light of their work.    Lamb and Fonstad described in the paper how it is hard to tell slow processes from rapid ones:It is difficult to identify morphologic features in Canyon Lake Gorge that indicate canyon formation during a 3 day event, versus a longer-lived flood or multiple events.  For example, inner channels, knickpoints and terraces are often formed slowly over geologic time in response to shifting climate or tectonic forcing, but in Canyon Lake Gorge and other megafloods they must have formed rapidly through intrinsic instabilities in the erosion processes.  A narrow gorge is sometimes inferred to represent slow persistent erosion, whereas Canyon Lake Gorge was formed in a matter of days.  It is clear that models for the rate of bedrock erosion are needed to calculate the duration of flooding necessary to excavate a canyon of known volume.  Although notable progress has been made, there are no well tested mechanistic models of bedrock erosion via plucking during megafloods.They did the best they could to come up with a “semi-empirical theory” of sediment transport capacity to account for the rapid erosion of Canyon Lake Gorge.  Apparently it was not the strength of the bedrock that limited erosion, but the ability of the water to pick up and move large blocks: “Thus, it seems plausible that erosion of well-jointed rock by large floods might be extremely rapid, such that canyon formation is limited by the capacity of the flood to transport plucked blocks rather than by the plucking processes itself.”  Whether that is the only surprising paradigm shift from this observational example of rapid canyon formation remains to be seen.  It may be time to change a lot of western national park interpretive signs.1.  Lamb and Fonstad, “Rapid formation of a modern bedrock canyon by a single flood event,” Nature Geoscience, Published online: 20 June 2010 | doi:10.1038/ngeo894.What does he mean this is not well understood?  If the secular geologists had been reading the creationist journals for decades, which are way ahead of the curve on this topic, they would not be so clueless.  The Creation Research Society Quarterly, Journal of Creation and other peer-reviewed journals written by creation scientists, with field research and PhDs, have for years been talking about the power of catastrophic processes to produce the Grand Canyon and other large earth features in just days and weeks by breached dams and other megaflooding processes.  This is nothing new, but the secular journals and news media act like it is.  It’s nice for the secular crowd, still awaking from their Lyellian slumbers, to catch the groove finally (better late than never), but how about some attribution?  Creationist authors of papers on this subject should get together and walk into Lamb’s office with a stack of their papers on catastrophic canyon formation by megafloods, pile them on his desk, and ask, “Where have you been all this time?”    Who speaks for science?  Notice what a bizarre situation this is.  The secularists have been admittedly clueless for a long time about the power of catastrophic flood geology, while the creationists have taken the lead on the subject.  But the creationists have been routinely and summarily ignored, because their opinions are deemed “religious” from the outset and therefore “pseudo-scientific.”  One would think that what matters in science is being right.  If a creation scientist has a PhD in geology or a related subject, has demonstrated competence in field work and research, and has published his ideas, it should not be an issue what his theology or motivations are – it should matter whether his ideas are reasonable, testable, and fit the evidence.  In fact, one’s degree or field work should not even matter.  Some scientific ideas that have stood the test of time were not published by people with degrees, or in peer-reviewed journals, or by the other standard trappings of today’s scientific milieu.    Philosophers of science recognize that the process of scientific discovery is irrelevant to the designation “scientific.”  If a geologist comes up with a theory in a dream that turns out to work, so be it.  Similarly, the process of scientific explanation should not be evaluated based on beliefs, memberships, degrees or associations.  Darwin and Wallace, you recall, were known mostly for field studies.  There may be political, social, and sociological reasons why Lamb and Fonstad did not reference creation literature in their paper, but there is no logical or scientific reason not to do so.  “But we have to have institutional standards to keep the crackpots out!” some skeptical gatekeeper will say.  Guess what; a lot of them are running rampant inside the ivied walls right now (e.g., 06/14/2010, 06/13/2010, 06/10/2010; follow the links on “Dumb Ideas” for a parade of the shameful).  Didn’t a famous Teacher once say to clean the inside of the cup first?    Unless modern secularists want to cut out Newton, Kepler, Boyle, Faraday and a host of other great achievers in science because they were Christians and creationists, it’s wrong to exclude today’s creation scientists simply on the basis of their beliefs and motivations.  Face it; everybody has beliefs and motivations.  Inside the academy, they might include naturalism and defending uniformitarianism.  The only way to guard against dogmatism and self-deception is to square off with those having other beliefs and motivations in light of the evidence.  And you know, maybe some of the best qualifications for good science come from the Judeo-Christian tradition: honesty, impartiality, humility, and a deep, abiding respect for the truth.(Visited 142 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ohio Crop Progress — April 9, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Weather Delays FieldworkThere was less than 1 day suitable for fieldwork in Ohio during the week ending April 8, according to Cheryl Turner, Ohio State Statistician with the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Excessive precipitation and low temperatures continued to delay fieldwork and crop progress, and even lead to flooding across parts the State. Pastures were too wet or still dormant, forcing producers to use stored hay and other forage for livestock. Soil temperatures slid back down to the low 30’s in the northern part of Ohio and back down to the low 40’s in the southern part of the State. Winter wheat condition was reported at 73 percent good to excellent despite reports of some fields still being dormant.Click here for the full reportlast_img read more

Getting a Grip on Green-Home Appraisals and Insurance

first_imgOne of green residential construction’s growing pains has been the disconnect between what an appraiser might declare a new, energy efficient house is worth and what it actually costs to build.It’s certainly not a new problem, and, fortunately, it continues to attract attention. Back in December, GBA Advisor Michael Chandler, founder Chandler Design-Build in North Carolina, wrote about his experience with the issue – an appraisal on a $400,000 project whose high-performance foam insulation and solar technology were valued at 50 cents on the dollar – and the need to educate Realtors, appraisers, and bankers about green building, and do it on a nationwide scale. RELATED ARTICLES Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 1Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 2Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 3Green Building Appraisal and Financing IssuesGreen Home Appraisal WoesA Step Toward Fairer Green Home ValuationsWhen Green Poses an Appraisal ProblemQ&A: Bad Appraisal on a New Green HomeQ&A: Refinance and Appraisal of Net-Zero Home We also noted that the appraisal problem can be particularly onerous when new or recently upgraded homes are located in rural areas, where MLS listings with comparable green features can be scarce or nonexistent.Force-fitting for a loanAbout two weeks ago, Chandler’s experience with the $400,000 home – and the green-home appraisal issue in general – was reprised in an article published by the Christian Science Monitor.“We had to go back and strip out some energy features like the solar water heaters and cut back on insulation and add square footage, making it bigger and less (energy-)efficient to get to the $400,000 appraisal,” he told the paper. “Houses that are dramatically more efficient than normal, on average cost $15,000 to $20,000 more than houses built to code standard, but that’s not being reflected in the appraisals.”Since green-home construction is nowadays one of the few sectors showing signs of life for residential builders, there’s added urgency to the push for education programs that can help appraisers measure the value of green-home features and more quickly build a database of relevant data, conventions, and guidelines.The CSM story notes that progress in that area might get a boost from some lenders in the banking community, who have begun to offer $1,000 off closing costs for homes that qualify as energy efficient. The Department of Energy points out on its website that there are several green mortgage products on market, but acknowledges that they’re not yet widely adopted. However, the DOE also notes that programs being developed in Maine, New York, and Colorado are designed to inject capital into mortgage products to “buy down” the interest rate that is charged to borrowers as an incentive to finance energy retrofits.The fledgling nature of green-product insuranceAnother actuarially measured component to green-home ownership, insurance, also has been trying to find its way in the emerging market. In a story published April 7, Insurance Journal presented an overview of the concerns that accompany some of the new insurance products being written to protect green construction components, including wind turbines, fuel cells, and garden roofs.The basic issue, some insurers say, is that many green-construction products are still too new to have a well-understood risk profile. Documentation on risks associated with vegetation on roofs is starting build, in part from claims pegged to leaking roofs, for example, but the deployment of wind and fuel cell energy sources in green buildings has not been the focus of many claims so far.David Cohen, senior director of real estate for Commercial Insurance at Fireman’s Fund Insurance, told Insurance Journal that insurers also are homing in on green-construction defect issues.“What everyone always historically or traditionally associates with construction risk is construction defects. Down the road, will there be any construction defect?” Cohen asked.“I think it really depends on exactly what you’re doing in terms of your building,” Cohen said. “If you’re building to the more basic level of LEED certification, for example LEED certified or Silver level, you’re probably not doing anything exotic in terms of the building’s system or technology” and the building would pose no more risk for construction defect than a traditional building. But as builders move up in LEED certification to Gold or Platinum, Cohen added, more unproven technologies are likely to come into play. “Certainly any time you have new technology,” he said, “you’ve got that unknown potential risk or construction defect risk.”last_img read more