Plants Found Two Miles Under Greenland Ice

first_imgAccording to a press release from University of Colorado,1 remnants of pine needles, bark and grass have been pulled up in an ice core from two miles under the Greenland ice sheet, between the bottom of the ice sheet and bedrock.  This is the first time plant material has been found under the Greenland ice, the report says. The suspected plant material under about 10,400 feet of ice indicates the Greenland Ice Sheet “formed very fast,” said NGRIP project leader Dorthe Dahl-Jensen, a professor at the University of Copenhagen’s Niels Bohr Institute.  “There is a big possibility that this material is several million years old — from a time when trees covered Greenland,” she said.1Lead: EurekAlert.The plant remains held in the researcher’s fingers are the scientific facts.  The deduction that trees covered Greenland sometime in the past is logical.  The millions-of-years scenario is storytelling.  But what amazing facts: how did pine trees grow in a place now seen as one of the biggest deep freezers on Earth?  How did the remains survive decay if the climate change was not extremely rapid?  This is one of many indicators of a past temperate climate in northern latitudes that changed suddenly; remember the redwoods under the Arctic? (see 03/22/2002 headline).(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ohio Pork Council to host Pork-a-Palooza

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Pork Council is pleased to host Pork-a-Palooza for the second year in a row. The event will be featuring bacon, BBQ and beer at the Delaware County Fairgrounds on May 18, 2019 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.Throughout the event, attendees will have the opportunity to dine on pork-centric food items from Central Ohio’s finest restaurants and food trucks, listen to live music, and take part in numerous kids activities, giveaways and educational experiences.“Pork-a-Palooza is a wonderful opportunity for the Delaware community to learn more about pork and how it’s raised in Ohio while enjoying an afternoon outside with friends and family,” said Ken Garee, Delaware County resident and Ohio Pork Council’s Director at Large.Price of admission is $6 per person, while children 12 and under are granted free admission. Tickets can be purchased online at pork-a-palooza.com or on the day of the event. Those who purchase their tickets online will be presented with an exclusive Pork-a-Palooza punch card on the day of the event. Punch card holders can visit each vendor to purchase their $2 Pork-a-Palooza sampler item for a chance to win a whole hog, processed and freezer-ready. Punch cards will also be available for purchase at Pork-a-Palooza for $5.“Back by popular demand, the Ohio Pork Council is thrilled to host their second Pork-a-Palooza in the Delaware Community this May, with new and exciting features for attendees of all ages,” Garee said.For more information, visit pork-a-palooza.com or contact Melissa Bell at 614-882-5887 or [email protected]last_img read more

Hadoop Adoption Accelerates, But Not For Data Analytics

first_img3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Related Posts Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… The Hadoop market is on a tear, growing at a compound annual growth rate of roughly 60%, according to IDC. But why it’s growing, or rather, how it’s being used, might surprise you. Given all the media hype around Hadoop and its power to predict everything from the optimal number of raisins in your cereal (23) to the exact date of Armageddon (next Tuesday – call in sick), it’s perhaps surprising to learn that comparatively few organizations use Hadoop for analytics. Today most enterprises use Hadoop for the pedestrian uses of storage and ETL (Extract, Transform, Load).Eventually enterprises get to sexy analytics. But we’re not there yet. Not by a long shot.‘Poor Man’s ETL’, ‘Unsupervised Digital Landfill’, Or Both?While commonly billed as an analytics tool, Hadoop remains “a poor man’s ETL” for the vast majority of enterprises. Yes, there are enterprises running interesting analytical workloads on Hadoop, but these are the exception, not the rule. Hence, while Cloudera cites three common use cases for Hadoop (data transformation, archiving, and exploration, I’m hearing from analysts that 75% or more of the actual Hadoop adoption resides in those first two use cases.Which is not to suggest such adoption is valueless. Quite the contrary.The Common Adoption Path For HadoopAs 451 Research analyst Matt Aslett highlighted at Hadoop Summit, there is a natural progression from using Hadoop to store large quantities of data (i.e., Hadoop as an “unsupervised landfill“), to processing and transforming that data and ultimately to analyzing that data. The fact that most enterprises have yet to get to analytics in any meaningful way is simply a description of where we are in the Hadoop market’s evolution.What is the Point of Hadoop from Hadoop_SummitIndeed, Aslett notes that “attempting to fast forward to analytics, missing out on the processing/integration stage, creates silos and will result in disillusionment.” We’re still early in Hadoop’s technological and market evolution, in part due to the complexity of the technology, with 26% of even the most sophisticated Hadoop users citing how long it takes to get into production as a gating factor to its widespread use. Gartner reveals even lower rates of adoption of Big Data projects, often involving Hadoop, at a mere 6%, as enterprises try to grapple with both appropriate use cases and understanding the relevant technology.Start With What You KnowSmall wonder, then, that enterprises are starting with known use cases like storage or ETL before proceeding to more ambitious analytics projects, as Christos Kotsakis suggests. We’re still getting comfortable with Hadoop. Applying an unfamiliar technology to a familiar problem makes a lot of sense.Some day, we’ll get to the point where mainstream adopters commonly use Hadoop for significant analytics. But we’re not there. Not yet. Just give it time.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. Matt Asaycenter_img IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#451 Research#Big Data#ETL#Hadoop#Matt Aslett last_img read more

Promote Broader Participation in Growth Strategy – Tourism Minister

first_img Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says for tourism to maximise its full potential, every Jamaican must be factored in any growth strategy going forward. Addressing a press conference at the Montego Bay Convention Centre on July 6, the Minister said global trends show that tourist destinations that do not promote high levels of linkages will not produce substantial economic development and may even “foster resentment” of the industry by local residents. Story Highlights Minister of Tourism, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, says for tourism to maximise its full potential, every Jamaican must be factored in any growth strategy going forward.Addressing a press conference at the Montego Bay Convention Centre on July 6, the Minister said global trends show that tourist destinations that do not promote high levels of linkages will not produce substantial economic development and may even “foster resentment” of the industry by local residents.“Our growth agenda must remain people-centred and aligned with broader national economic and social imperatives. It is important that we understand that sustainable tourism must mean inclusive growth that will expand economic benefits to our local population, and in the process help to move people’s lives from poverty to prosperity,” Mr. Bartlett argued.He emphasised that the tourism sector must not only generate prosperity and wealth for a few but must be inclusive to where all Jamaicans feel “they have a legitimate shot at a piece of the pie”.“The sector must also seek to preserve the natural and cultural resources of our beautiful island,” he added.Mr. Bartlett said the industry must also help to strengthen linkages with other sectors of the economy, particularly the agricultural and manufacturing sectors. “It is also important to strengthen the benefits derived from the industry by local residents and communities, so as to promote broader participation by our people,” he said.Noting that community tourism is a priority area of “sustainable tourism”, the Minister said that Jamaica’s National Community Tourism Policy and Strategy “envisions” an invigorated tourism sector in communities that enriches quality of life through social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits, while exemplifying sustainable livelihoods.“We have also established our Tourism Linkages Network, which has a mandate of promoting sustainable tourism development in Jamaica by developing and strengthening sustainable linkages between the tourism sector and other productive sectors of the economy, such as agriculture, manufacturing and the creative industries, including entertainment,” Mr. Bartlett said.He also pointed to the “wonderful work being done” by the Tourism Linkages Council, which is made up of public- and private-sector partners who oversee the coordination and implementation of effective and sustainable strategies that strengthen and facilitate linkages.Meanwhile, the Minister argued that if Jamaica intends to continue to be globally competitive, “we must find ways to unlock new sources of competitiveness”.One approach, he said, would be to diversify offerings to attract new markets, as international travellers have become far more demanding and have higher expectations of the destinations to which they travel.The Minister pointed out that international tourism trends are showing a shift from the traditional ‘sun, sea and sand’ and more towards interactive experiential tourism.“We have to continue appealing to markets interested in gastronomy, nature, heritage and cultural experiences. Our tourism sector must continue to position itself to tap into these emerging markets that constitute the future of global tourism,” Mr. Bartlett said. “Our growth agenda must remain people-centred and aligned with broader national economic and social imperatives. It is important that we understand that sustainable tourism must mean inclusive growth that will expand economic benefits to our local population, and in the process help to move people’s lives from poverty to prosperity,” Mr. Bartlett argued. last_img read more