2010 torch relay route announced

first_imgThe torch relay route for the 2010 Winter Olympics was announced on Friday.The torch’s journey will begin in Victoria, and travel to 266 communities in BC, and more than 1000 across Canada.There will be no international relay leg, only Canadian communities as far reaching as St. John’s, NFLD, and Alert, Nunavut. – Advertisement -By the end of the 106-day relay, the torch will have travelled 45,000 kilometres by land, sea and air, and come within an hour’s drive of 90 per cent of the Canadian population. And yes, the torch will visit Northern BC, including stops in Prince George, Fort Nelson, Dawson Creek, and Fort St. John.For a complete and interactive map of the relay route, visit http://www.vancouver2010.com/en/torch-relays/the-route/interactive-map/-/58040/17ckajb/index.htmlAdvertisementlast_img read more

Why Ian Holloway would be perfect for the Swansea job

first_imgThere’s no doubt in my mind that Ian Holloway would be the right man to take over from Brendan Rodgers at Swansea.The likes of Dennis Bergkamp and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer have been linked with the job and while they are big names who achieved a lot as players, I think Ollie has the edge in terms of experience. He’s also an excellent man-manager.Most importantly, he would continue the brand of football Rodgers and Roberto Martinez introduced at Swansea.I certainly wouldn’t have been able to say that about him a few years ago and I know he’d be the first to admit that.But the great thing about Ollie is that he’s developed so much as a manager and has embraced new ideas.During his time out of the game after he left Leicester, I went to see him at his house in Bristol and we spoke for ages about how his ideas had changed.OLLIE’S MANAGERIAL PATH1996-2001: Bristol Rovers2001-2006: QPR2006-2007: Plymouth2007-2008: LeicesterSince 2009: BlackpoolWhen I played under him at QPR he had a certain way of doing things, but since his experience at Leicester he’s taken stock.He’s studied the game and looked at new ways of doing things, and that’s been highlighted by what he’s done at Blackpool.When I visited him he said that he’d be a much better manager when he got back into the game. He realised what he’d been doing wrong and spoke passionately about the need to play a more open, expansive game.He wanted to get away from the old way of doing things, with 4-4-2 and balls into the channels. He’d studied forward-thinking coaches and talked about the 4-3-3 system he now favoured – a similar style to the one Rodgers has since used at Swansea.He was saying to me ‘Imagine how good you’d be in a system like that’ – this from the man who’d previously wanted Dan Shittu to bang the ball forward as early as possible and favoured the kind of anti-football a lot of managers focus on these days.When he got the job at Blackpool, I spent pre-season training with them and saw at first hand the immediate impact he had there.It was a surprise to many people how well they did in his first season, but I’d seen straightaway that he really meant business and had come back a much more complete manager.One of his great strengths is his excellent man-management skills– and that’s really important. He’s down-to-earth and deals with players in the right way.Yes, someone like Bergkamp, who was brought up on total football at Ajax, would have a lot of gravitas. But would he be able to man-manage at a club where there are no obvious stars?Ollie definitely would be able to get the best out of that group of players. He’d be ideal in that respect.I also know from my time as a Cardiff player that there’s an intensity in Wales that any manager of Swansea will need to understand.Again, I think Ollie is well equipped. He has the personality to manage in that environment and also has experience from his years in Bristol, where there’s something similar with City and Rovers.Ollie’s done a brilliant job at Blackpool with the resources he’s had there and definitely deserves another crack at the Premier League.I also think having someone continue the Rodgers-Martinez way is really important – not only for Swansea, but for football in this country.We need more managers who play football the way it should be played.Modern-day managers seem to be moving in the opposite direction, but the modern-day Ian Holloway is a refreshing alternative.He’d be great for Swansea and Swansea would be great for him. It’s the perfect fit. Follow Richard Langley on Twitterlast_img read more

SA ‘will solve mining challenges’

first_img18 September 2013 The South African government is determined to resolve the challenges currently facing the country’s mining sector, Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe told a high-profile gathering of UK government and industry representatives in London on Tuesday. South Africa’s mining industry has been hit by a spate of industrial action since last year, leading to a drop in production. More recently, slowing growth in China, the global decline in commodity prices as well as domestic work stoppages have resulted in lower growth for the country’s mines. “The government of South Africa is determined to do everything possible to strengthen this sector in these difficult global economic conditions,” Motlanthe told the gathering at Chatham House. Motlanthe, accompanied by Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan, Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu and Deputy International Relations Minister Ebrahim Ebrahim, is on an official visit to the UK promote trade and investment, particularly in South Africa’s mining sector. He told Tuesday’s gathering that South Africa’s “deeply entrenched” history of dialogue to resolve social conflict was well-known. “Social dialogue has over the years enabled us to mobilise a broad section of society under the rubric of conflict resolution and reconciliation, invariably impelled by the fact of our indissoluble future as a nation. “We have addressed many other intractable conflicts in our country through this time-tested mechanism,” Motlanthe said. “Not only that, social dialogue has found constitutional expression in a number of institutions that have stood us in good stead since the birth of democracy.” South Africa’s dialogue platforms included the National Economic Development and Labour Council (Nedlac) and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA). In July, the government, mining companies and organised labour (with exception of the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union) signed a framework agreement that provides the basis for cooperation to stabilise the mining sector and set it on a sustainable footing. The parties to the agreement committed themselves to improving processes and procedures as well as implementing new measures to bring about lasting change, while working together to sustain and improve the sector. The parties also made a firm commitment to work together to restore peace and stability on the country’s mines. Motlanthe said this was crucial for creating an environment conducive to growth and development. Workers and managers needed to be able to go to work without fear of harm, Motlanthe said. Workers also had to be free to exercise their constitutional right to join the trade union of their choice, to declare disputes, to strike and to engage in peaceful protest. Both workers and employers had to ensure that all matters pertaining to labour relations, including union recognition, verification of membership and wage negotiations, were conducted in line with the Labour Relations Act, which provided the primary foundation for labour relations in South Africa. Motlanthe said the government would act decisively to enforce the rule of law, maintain peace during strikes and other protests relating to labour disputes, and ensure the protection of life, property and the advancement of the rights of all. The government would further ensure that the country’s law enforcement agencies acted in a manner that was fair, impartial and objective. There was an emergent appreciation, he said, that the stakeholders in the mining sector had to build relationships based on trust and respect and avoid actions that adversely affected this relationship. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

State of the Nation: all eyes on Zuma

first_img13 February 2014All eyes will be on President Jacob Zuma on Thursday night as he delivers the sixth and final State of the Nation address of the current administration. The speech will be delivered to a joint sitting of Parliament in Cape Town at 7pm, and broadcast live on national radio and television.SAnews features editor Chris Bathembu takes a glance at the highlights of Zuma’s previous five addresses.2009It was a cold winter afternoon on 3 June 2009 when Zuma delivered his first State of the Nation speech following the elections of that year. The world economy was reeling from the effects of the recession. More than 900 000 South Africans had lost their jobs between 2008 and 2009, while some companies continued to cut staff due to rising costs of oil and energy.It was not going to be an easy speech for Zuma. Some cringed when he announced that between June and December 2009, the economy would have created about 500 000 job opportunities. The key element to the jobs drive would be the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP), which had achieved an initial target of one-million jobs by 2009.Zuma also knew that something needed to be done fast to cushion the poor from the aftermath of the most devastating economic crisis since the great depression. He announced the introduction of the training layoff scheme. Though it was met with opposition from Cosatu and the National Youth Development Agency, the plan would help to protect workers who would ordinarily have faced retrenchment. Companies in distress would also be assisted to train inexperienced workers. In the end, these workers would, instead of being retrenched, be kept in employment for a period of time and re-skilled.Zuma also announced that a scaled-up Industrial Policy Action Plan would be developed. The lead sectors in this were to be the automotive, chemicals, metal fabrication, tourism, clothing and textiles, and forestry sectors.This paved the way for the development of the New Growth Path (NGP) a year later. The NGP identified five key priorities, namely education, health, the fight against crime, creating decent work, and rural development and land reform, which would form the focal point for the rest of the five-year term of the current administration.Zuma ended that speech by saying: “Since the implementation of our programme will take place in the face of the economic downturn, we will have to act prudently. No wastage, no rollovers of funds – every cent must be spent wisely and fruitfully. We must cut our cloth according to our size.”2010It was 11 February, and this speech was to be delivered in the evening and broadcast on national television, to allow working people to follow it from home. There was much hype around it, as the date coincided with the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in 1990.As expected, Zuma began his address by reminding South Africans of Mandela’s release, a watershed moment in the country’s history. Then it was down to the business of the day.Zuma reminded the nation that the global economic crisis had cost the economy about 900 000 jobs. He announced that to provide a safety cushion for the poor, the government would extend its child support grant to children over 14 years of age, and over the following three years to children aged 15 to 18 years.More than 480 000 public works job opportunities had been created, he said, which was 97% of the target set the previous year. The jobs were in construction, home and community-based care, and environmental projects.Zuma’s major announcement for 2010 was the R846-billion he said the government would spend on public infrastructure. The New Growth Path, he added, had been adopted as the official framework for economic policy and the driver of the country’s jobs strategy.Zuma also announced that all grade 3, 6 and 9 pupils would henceforth write literacy and numeracy tests that were independently moderated. The government had set a target of increasing the number of matric students who were eligible for university admission to 175 000 a year by 2014.Zuma wrapped up that speech by saying: “Inspired by our icon Madiba, it is my honour to dedicate this 2010 State of the Nation address to all our heroes and heroines, sung and unsung, known and unknown. Let us work together to make this year of action a successful one for our country.”2011This speech, delivered on 10 February, was all about jobs. Zuma announced the establishment of a Jobs Fund to the tune of R9-billion over three years to finance new job-creation initiatives. The Industrial Development Corporation had set aside R10-billion over five years for investment in economic activities with high job potential. Up to R20-billion was to go towards tax allowances or tax breaks to promote investments, expansions and upgrades in the manufacturing sector.Zuma also announced that South Africa had joined the Brazil, Russia, India, China (BRIC) grouping of influential emerging economies.He noted that more than 400 000 additional people had been connected to the country’s water supply the previous year, while about 81% of the country was now electrified, compared to 63% in the year 2000.About R44-million had been recovered from public servants illegally benefiting from housing subsidies. Just over 5-million HIV tests have been conducted since the launch of the testing campaign the previous April.Zuma concluded that speech by saying: “We must therefore act together as a united people, for national reconciliation, for nation building, for the birth of a new world.”2012This speech, delivered on 9 February, focused on several key things that government would have to do to grow the economy, introducing the National Development Plan (NDP) as key to the elimination of poverty and inequality over the next two decades.Zuma used this speech to report back on a number of issues. The Jobs Fund, which was announced in 2011, had begun operating and 2 500 applications had been received in the first round. Project allocations of over R1-billion had been committed. In addition, seven projects with an investment value of R8.4-billion had been approved for the R20-billion tax incentive announced in 2011.Transnet would invest R300-billion over seven years in capital projects. Of this amount, R200-billion had been allocated to rail projects and the balance to projects in the ports.Zuma said the state would develop a major new south-eastern node to improve the industrial and agricultural development and export capacity of the Eastern Cape and expand the province’s linkages with the Northern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. In the former Transkei, part of the Eastern Cape, a dam would be built using the Umzimvubu River as the source in order to expand agricultural production.More than 220 000 solar geysers had installed in homes nationwide. The target was one-million solar geysers by 2014-2015.Zuma wrapped up that speech with these words: “I would like to appeal to all our people to join hands as they always do, as we deal decisively with the triple challenge of unemployment, poverty and inequality. Nobody will do this for us, it is in our hands. And we are all equal to the task.”2013Zuma began this speech by referring to the crisis in the Eurozone, which is South Africa’s major trading partner, accounting for around 21 percent of the country’s exports.He also spoke at length about the National Development Plan (NDP), which outlines interventions to put the economy on a better footing. The speech set the target for job creation at 11-million by 2030 – while noting that the economy needed to grow threefold to create the desired jobs. Zuma said that the government would have spent about R860-billion rand on infrastructure since 2009. Various projects were being implemented around the country.The Judicial Commission of Inquiry, led by Judge Ian Farlam, had been appointed to probe the tragedy in Marikana, where more than 44 people were killed during a strike by miners.Investments amounting to R400-million in green economy projects had been approved for municipalities, other organs of state, community organisations and the private sector across all provinces.The Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences Units had secured over 363 life sentences, with a conviction rate of 73%, for crimes against women above 18 years old and 70% for crimes against children under 18 years of age.Zuma ended the speech by saying: “As South Africans, we should continue to have one primary goal – to make our country a truly great and prosperous nation.”Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Mets’ deGrom Outduels SF’s Peavy

first_imgNEW YORK — Jake Peavy took little solace in knowing he had a perfect game going into the seventh inning — especially after the night ended with another loss.Peavy was outpitched by Jacob deGrom in a tantalizing hitless duel that carried into the seventh inning Saturday before the New York Mets broke loose and beat the San Francisco Giants 4-2.“There are a lot of positives. I had really good command, threw the ball mostly where I want to,” Peavy said. “But it is just hard to dwell on that right now with your team losing the game.”Pablo Sandoval doubled off deGrom with two outs in the top of the seventh for the game’s first hit.Peavy (1-11) was perfect until Daniel Murphy hit a one-out double into the bottom of the seventh on a ball that left fielder Michael Morse misjudged.The Mets went on to score four runs to back deGrom (6-5), and hand Peavy a defeat in his 11th straight decision, a streak that started with Boston.Peavy had never taken a no-hit try past 5 1-3 innings, but the 2007 NL Cy Young Award winner was dealing in his second start for San Francisco. He allowed four runs and four hits in seven innings.This was the second time this season that a game didn’t have any hits until there were two outs in the top of the seventh inning. Milwaukee’s Matt Garza and Atlanta’s Aaron Harang each had their no-hit bids broken up in the seventh on April 2.Murphy’s double came soon after there was a brief delay when Sandoval ran into the third-base railing chasing a foul ball.Morse took his first step in on Murphy’s line drive and couldn’t recover, setting off the Mets’ four-run inning. Travis d’Arnaud had a sacrifice fly, Juan Lagares hit an RBI single and Wilmer Flores added a two-run double.“I was playing shallow in, and he hit it pretty good, it just kept going away towards the line,” Morse said.In a scoreless game, Giants Manager Bruce Bochy never considered replacing Morse in left field. “You hate to take out one of your big bats in the seventh in a tie game, never know what is going to happen,” Bochy said.Both deGrom and Peavy got some help in keeping the bases clear until Brandon Belt walked with two outs in the fifth.The Mets backed their starter with fine glovework, while Peavy benefited from a replay call. DeGrom, batting eighth in the Mets’ lineup was initially safe for an infield hit in the third, but was the ruling was reversed.DeGrom was pulled with one out in the eighth following pinch-hitter Travis Ishikawa’s two-run single. In a career-high 7 1-3 innings, the lanky 26-year-old allowed four hits and two runs. He struck out seven in his 15th career start.“I knew it at the fifth inning so it was kind of a mental battle,” deGrom said of the dual no-hitters, “but I was sticking to the plan we had and I was going right after the guys.”Jenrry Mejia put runners on the corners in the ninth but got former St. John’s star Joe Panik to ground out for his 16th save.(HOWIE RUMBERG, AP Sports Writer) TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more