Travel grant offered to Eton students only

first_imgBalliol College offers a travel grant worth up to £4,000 available only for students who have previously attended Eton College, Cherwell has learnt.Conditions for the award further stipulates that the Old-Etonians must spend the money travelling to a foreign university and engaging in “a study of the social conditions of the common people.”The Vaughan Memorial Travelling Scholarship, established by the will of the late Mrs D.J. Vaughan, requires that candidates must be current undergraduates of limited means who have spent at least part of their previous education at Eton College. Although preference is given to Balliol students, all former Eton students are eligible to apply.Balliol student Henry Edwards responded that few students were aware of the scholarship, commenting, “I haven’t heard people talk about this grant at all here. I’m guessing it’s quite old and that it was offered to the college at a time when they did accept unfair or exclusive stipulations like that.”Another student added, “There hasn’t been much of a reaction from Balliol students to this as it hasn’t been promoted, at least not to my knowledge. Perhaps it has been promoted only amongst old Etonians.” She said, “It seems extremely unusual that Balliol would limit a grant based on schooling and especially in such an elitist way.“It doesn’t fit with how much effort the college and the JCR put into access schemes and equality of opportunity amongst college members. Balliol has exceptional bursary provision and provision of travel and other grants open to all students, so I’m not sure why this type of discrimination based on schooling would be allowed.”A former Eton student currently at Balliol said, “Perhaps it is unfair,” adding, “Unfortunately we don’t get to choose who should and shouldn’t be able to apply to any grants. That’s the choice of the generous person who sets up the grant. In an ideal world all the money would go in a big pot and be distributed equally.” An Oxford University spokesperson said, ‘This legacy was made to Balliol College back in the 1950s, and by modern standards it does seem absurd – in fact, if a gift were offered today with those terms, an Oxford college would simply not accept it. However, the college can’t change the terms of the will retrospectively.’The spokesperson added, ‘Importantly, Balliol College regulations allow any unspent funds to be transferred to the general college funds – and the college, alongside the university, makes extremely generous financial provision for all students, especially those from lower-income backgrounds. From this year, Oxford University will offer the most generous, no-strings-attached financial support to the poorest students of any university in the country, worth up to £22,000 over three years.’St Anne’s Classicist Jasmine Krishnamurthy-Spencer commented, “I just think it’s weird above anything else. If you want to give your money away, why make the conditions so limited? I mean, I know over twenty percent of students are on some form of financial support but there can’t be that many of them at Balliol.”Edwards agreed, commenting, “I’m guessing it’s rarely claimed, as there are currently only about two former Eton students I know of in the entire student body.”Balliol JCR President Ben Marshall released a statement on behalf of the student body, explaining, “The Vaughan Memorial Travelling Scholarship is awarded to undergraduates of limited means to help fund a postgraduate year at a foreign university. It was established in the will of the late Mrs Vaughan, and at that bequest there are a number of stipulations, including the type of study undergone and the attainment of a 2:1 or above.“The fact that applicants must have spent at least some of their time in education at Eton is another condition of the will of Mrs Vaughn, and not one imposed by Balliol College. Since the establishment of the Vaughn Scholarship, the Development Office have altered their donation acceptance requirements so that this type of grant is no longer introduced, a change welcomed by the JCR.”Dr Nicola Trott, senior tutor at Balliol College, declined to comment.last_img read more

Student-athletes need more class time

first_imgIn the argument of student-athlete compensation, one side generally defends the current system saying that these athletes are getting their tuition paid for and that is a huge sum of money. Of course, not all college athletes are on a full-ride scholarship, but for those that are; their scholarship doesn’t achieve its full value.Photo courtesy USC Sports InformationBusy schedule · The men’s golf team has a busy November, playing on Monday and Tuesday before hitting the links again next week for three days. It’s just one instance of an athletic team tied down by a rough schedule.Student-athletes continually choose their sport over school because the Pac-12 and their school force them to. How can anyone expect student-athletes to put their academics first when their governing bodies refuse to do the same?This debate is especially relevant given all the attention that Thursday night football games have been given and their impact on the minutes football players spend in the classroom, but it isn’t just about football players. Once again the massive entity that is collegiate football has overshadowed the non-revenue sports that suffer from this problem just as much if not more.The men’s golf team has two consecutive weeks in November in which they have a tournament during the week. This week, the team played on Monday and Tuesday and next week they will be on the links Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.That means they are missing the equivalent of a full week of school from just two tournaments.The women’s volleyball team also plays a significant number of times during the week. This week they played in Tucson on Wednesday night and again in Tempe on Friday, meaning they will miss Tuesday through Friday this week.“On Tuesday we travel, Wednesday we play and Thursday we travel to Tempe,” women’s volleyball head coach Mick Haley said to the Daily Trojan before the team left. “Then we play early Friday at 6 p.m., but we can’t get out that night, which is terrible because we have to get up early to get them back by 9 the next morning on Saturday.”This atrocious schedule leaves very little room to achieve academic excellence. In the same interview, Haley said he thought the team would only be in school for eight days in November.It doesn’t matter how many administrators and coaches come out and say academics are the priority for their teams if their actions speak differently.This isn’t a new problem either and the NCAA in all its resplendent glory is aware of the problem.The organization has conducted a study in order to gain insight into the experiences and well being of student athletes. This survey, “Growth, Opportunity, Aspirations and Learning of Students in College,” was conducted in 2006, 2010 and most recently in 2015.The findings are disheartening, considering the word student comes first in student-athlete. In Division I schools, athletes reported dedicating a median of 34 hours a week to their sport in-season, a two-hour increase since 2010. Not surprisingly, football players spent the most time, averaging 42 hours a week. The other sport that struck the 40-hour mark — that of a full-time job — was baseball at 40 hours per week.The silver lining is that athletes also said they are spending more time on academics than they were in 2010 with the number of hours per week rising from 35.5 hours to 38.5 hours while they are in season. Across the board, female student-athletes said they spent more time studying than their male counterparts.Fifty-nine percent of male and 66 percent of female Division I athletes said they want to spend more time on academics during the season. The three sports who consistently reported they spent significantly more time on athletics than academics were football, baseball and men’s golf.Student-athletes are missing class at very high rates as well. Ten percent of football players reported missing three or more classes a week during their season, and this was the lowest number among of the categories the NCAA provided for Division I athletes. Nineteen percent of baseball players, 21 percent of men’s basketball players and 22 percent of women’s basketball players — all limited to Division I athletes — reported missing three or more classes a week during their season.Between the time spent traveling or working out and the time spent pursuing a degree, the life of a college athlete is far busier than most average students. Unfortunately, most of the student-athletes surveyed were not dissatisfied with these time commitments during the season.By promoting a culture of athletics taking precedent over academics, these athletes are being done a disservice by their universities.According to the NCAA, just 1.6 percent of NCAA football players go on to compete in the NFL. 1.1 percent of men’s basketball players make it to the NBA and for baseball players, 9.7 will be drafted by a Major League team.By taking athletes out of the classroom for such a significant time, the University is taking away valuable preparation for a world beyond athletics. This isn’t to say that college sports should be done away with, there just needs to be some reform in the amount of time that these athletes are expected to contribute to their schools when what they are receiving in return — their education — is being taken away from them.Hailey Tucker is a junior majoring in broadcast and digital journalism. She is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. Her column, “Tucker Talks,” runs Thursdays.last_img read more

McGregor predicts KO of Cerrone, insists no bad blood between pair

first_img“I don’t want anything easy … it’s good to be in there with him and really get in there and f—ing giving it all we’ve got. I’m going five rounds with this dude, I cannot f—ing wait until Saturday night.”He added: “He’s the two-time belt holding champ so you can definitely say that this is to date the toughest battle I’ve stepped in against and I’m stoked.”‘Cowboy, can you fight the big fight? You never make it on the big fight.’ Well, m—f—, here’s the biggest one, let’s see.” The Irishman and Cerrone were involved in a heated exchange during a news conference in 2015, but were far more respectful on Wednesday.But McGregor (21-4) predicted a knockout victory, although he spoke of his respect for Cerrone.”I’ve had my back and forth with Donald throughout the years,” he said.”The last time we spoke to each other or even saw each other would’ve been at that press conference many years ago. So much has changed since then.”I was the interim featherweight world champion at the time and Donald predicted I wouldn’t get through [Jose] Aldo. I got through Aldo. He predicted I was too small for the 155-pound division, I conquered that division.”We’ve had a good back and forth myself and Donald and as time has gone on he’s become a family man, obviously you’ve seen him compete so many times it’s hard not to respect Donald right now at this stage and he has my respect.”Although there will be blood spilled on January 18, it will not be bad blood and for the Mystic Mac prediction, it will be a KO.”Saturday night. #UFC246 pic.twitter.com/Tu6dgW6TTq— UFC (@ufc) January 16, 2020Cerrone is excited about facing McGregor and said it would be the biggest challenge of his career so far.”I’m looking forward to four or five rounds of battling with this dude man,” he said. Conor McGregor promised there would be blood spilled in his welterweight showdown with Donald Cerrone at UFC 246 on Saturday.McGregor is returning to the octagon for the first time since his loss to Khabib Nurmagomedov in October 2018, facing Cerrone in Las Vegas.last_img read more